Mozambique

Mozambique Floods: Updated International Appeal of the Government of Mozambique (Mar - Aug 2000)

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Posted
Originally published


Request for International assistance March-August 2000

Sector / Activity
Gross requirements
Contributions received
Net requirements
Food assistance
35,545,828
8,200,000
27,345,828
Emergency Transportation
10,993,842
0
10,993,842
Infrastructure: road repairs
36,095,000
36,095,000
0
Emergency repair of power lines
14,000,000
0
14,000,000
Health and nutrition
7,621,700
3,709,216
3,912,484
Education
2,850,400
1,297,111
1,553,289
Child protection
622,150
218,739
403,411
Gender Equity
800,000
0
800,000
Water, Sanitation, Environment
6,586,630
3,650,739
2,935,891
Shelter
27,774,600
5,377,480
22,397,120
Agriculture
13,190,000
0
13,190,000
Mine action
2,865,000
100,000
2,765,000
coordination
1,590,500
262,000
1,328,500
TOTAL
160,535,650
58,691,546
101,844,104
Updated International Appeal of the Government of Mozambique for Emergency Relief and Rehabilitation in collaboration with the United Nations Agencies.

I. Objective

Today the Government of Mozambique launched an update of the international appeal of 24 February. The update seeks resources from the international community for 100million US$ to ensure ongoing emergency activities for the benefit of 650,000 flood victims in the provinces of Maputo, Gaza, Sofala, Inhambane, Manica and Tete. This figure includes some 450,000 displaced people; the others are being assisted in their villages as a result of the floods. The updated appeal covers the period March to end of August 2000.

Although most of the people are still in the sites, returns are taking place. Given the current level of rivers, this process is expected to take at least another month.

The update is the result of a collaborative effort between the Government, UN agencies –UNDP, FAO, WHO, UNESCO, UNICEF, WFP, UNFPA, UNEP/HABITAT – as well as major NGOs. Its prime objective is to fill the gap between short – term humanitarian and recovery needs and the implementation of a portfolio of rehabilitation projects. It provides a coordinated framework, ensuring the continuation of emergency assistance to those who have lost crops and houses and marks the beginning of the transition towards rehabilitation in several sectors.

II. Context

On 24 February the Government of Mozambique appealed to the international community for 65 million USD to assist 300,000 flood victims for six months. The United Nations agencies Inter-Agency appeal for 13 million USD was part of it. International responses were generous. Recent reports by OCHA indicate about 118 million USD. Not all of these however were made directly against the appeal. Considerable amounts were made bilaterally; others expressed the monetary value of contributions in kind. The Government has repeatedly expressed its gratitude to the international community.

III. Justification

An update of the February appeal was indeed necessary, since, at the time of its launching, it could, obviously, not take into account the dramatic deterioration created by the impact of the cyclones on Mozambique and its neighbours at the end of February. Whereas the appeal of 24 February appeal was based on the immediate needs for 300,000 people, this figure had doubled by early March. According to Government figures, the number of the affected population soared to nearly two million. Although the overall damage caused by the floods is still being assessed, the Government has indicated that it caused a serious setback to the progress the country has achieved over recent years.

IV. Sectoral Overview

The update presents requirements on a sectoral basis, as did the February appeal. The respective sectoral groups formulated objectives and the corresponding implementation strategies for the humanitarian interventions by the Government and the UN agencies.

The brief summary below highlights several of the planned humanitarian interventions by sector and agency.

The success of humanitarian interventions, i.e. the rapid delivery of adequate goods to the needy population, depends, as always, on access and the means of delivery. In this respect the updated appeal places high importance on the urgent repair of secondary roads and bridges as well as to the availability of funds to maintain for at least a month the air transportation assets on a commercial basis for at least one month.

The National Administration of Highways and Roads has prepared a priority road repair programme as well as a rehabilitation programme for damaged public buildings in the affected provinces. Provincial and district administrators will play a crucial role in the resettlement of the flood victims in the month to come.

WFP has included the emergency repair of about 1,000-km of roads and bridges in its programme and will work closely with the National Road Administration in its implementation. In view of the gradual phasing out of the military assets and the possibility that urgent road repairs may take more time than envisaged, the availability of air transport for food and non-food items is essential. WFP is therefore including in its appeal an air transportation operation in two phases, requiring 14 million US$.

WFP’s food distribution programme - comprising a total of 53,000 tons – will cover the needs for 650,000 people for the coming six months. From June onwards FFW activities will target flood victims, having lost their employment. Over the next three months a supplementary feeding programme for children and women will be implemented.

Coordination among UN agencies strongly manifests itself in the sectors: Water, Sanitation, Health and Nutrition and Education:

UNICEF and WHO will work together on water supply scheme for 29 towns, also including disinfecting and major clean-up operations. The activities in these sectors require funds for close to 5.3 million US$.

Provision of clean water, debris and mud clearing is also the focus of UNEP/HABITAT’s interventions. 80,000 people in the towns of Xai-Xai and Chokwe are expected to benefit from the digging of 10 wells and a waste disposal campaign. Together with an assessment mission of the state of environment in these areas, requirements amount to 1.3 million USD.

WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and WHO will be working together on the implementation of numerous activities in the Health and Nutrition sector. These include, among many others, the re-equipment of damaged facilities, immunization campaigns, the provision of temporary housing for health facilities and medical treatments of affected people. Funding requirements amount to 6,508,400 US$.

Emergency shelter needs have been identified by INGC and UNDP for some 350,000 affected people. Assistance in the accommodation centres will include tents, plastic sheeting and blankets. Boats with engines and spares for rescue operations and transportation of relief items is also required. Resettlement assistance packages will be provided to 70,000 families who lost their houses and belongings. These are of crucial importance in order for the flood victims to get back to normal daily activities. Net requirements for this component of the updated appeal come to 21 million USD.

Over 600 primary schools have suffered flood damage, affecting over 200,000 pupils. UNESCO,UNICEF and WFP will work together in the provision of technical advice on the reconstruction of buildings, bringing in learning and teaching materials and equipment as well as the provision of food through FFW. 2.8 million USD are required for this important sector.

In the agricultural sector, an estimated 122,600 rural families have seen their livelihoods seriously affected. There has been a tremendous loss to standing crops and livestock, in addition to important infrastructure, including homesteads, feeder roads and market infrastructure, irrigation schemes, farm equipment and animal disease control facilities. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development with the support of FAO, NGO’s and other partners in the agricultural sector estimate that US$13.2 million will be required over the next six months for immediate response and rehabilitation of essential services to enable the rural communities to rebuild their livelihoods.

The overall impact of the floods on the economies of the affected province will only become known once the waters have subsided. Longer-term rehabilitation requirements for the country will be the subject of an international donor conference to be held in April in Rome. The Government is working towards the conference with a core group of donors and UN agencies. It is hoped that the conference will be an opportunity for designing innovative approaches in key economic sectors on the basis of reducing vulnerabilities through proper disaster prevention measures.

EMERGENCY NEEDS AND REQUIREMENTS BY SECTOR

1. Food Assistance

1.1. Emergency relief food assistance

(i) Objectives

The immediate objective of this expanded WFP emergency operation is to save lives and maintain nutritional/health status of especially women & children, who i) in rural areas have lost their crops and livestock, foodstocks and housing; ii) in urban areas have lost their means of income and access to food; or iii) are displaced and sheltered in temporary centres. When the flood conditions normalise, WFP food aid will facilitate the return of displaced population and support their recovery of infrastructure though food for work (FFW).

Over 6 months, some 650,000 people will receive WFP emergency food assistance. Most are rural people and earn their livelihoods from crop and livestock husbandry. Average annual crop production only lasts 3-6 months when there is no 2nd harvest, and most of the flood affected districts have been identified as chronically food insecure during normal (non flood) years. The affected urban people normally depend on trading and employment, and many are now unemployed due to the flooding of farm estates.

(ii) Justification

An expansion is needed of the current emergency assistance for the initial 110,000 people affected by floods in Mozambique due to Cyclones Connie and Eline in February 2000. Following the 2nd wave of floods caused by excess river runoff from neighbouring countries, 650,000 people will need food aid. This flood is unmatched in recorded history in its destruction - thousands of hectares of farm land have been lost in the five provinces of Gaza, Inhambane, Manica, Maputo and Sofala, and there is severe damage in urban areas to houses, roads and farms.

A total of 99 transit camps are currently established with ever rising numbers of beneficiaries - each camp with 3,000-60,000 people. There are also large numbers of people located in isolated areas in need of food assistance. In addition to the five provinces mentioned above, water levels have risen in Tete Province as well and additional food needs have been identified.

Road transport on the national north-south highway and other secondary roads has been cut off at several places with bridges and railways damaged. The challenge now is to supply food to the flood victims via helicopter and boat. More rains expected until the end of the rainy season in early April will exacerbate the already heavily damaged roads, bridges, health and school centres and houses as well as the displacement of more people, and loss of more crop land and livestock. Many poor communities are isolated from markets, or face exorbitant transport and food prices. Farmers also urgently need seeds.

This request will cover relief and rehabilitation food needs for 650,000 people until the 2nd harvest season in mid August. The duration is 6 months (mid-March to mid-August 2000).

(iii) Strategy

Mode of Implementation

The Government has established a national emergency coordination mechanism chaired by the National Institute for Disaster Management. Flood committees at provincial, district, administrative post and locality levels, with Government, NGO and religious organisations evaluate food needs. District administrators, recently trained within the WFP development project Food Fund (WFP/MOZ/5935), receive, store and distribute relief items and arrange transport from warehouses to transit centre committees. Locality leaders take over, and with the support of NGOs, distribute food to beneficiaries. They are encouraged to work through women leaders and with women beneficiaries.

Food Aid Strategy

General relief food will be provided i) to flood affected people who have lost their houses, assets and fields; ii) until the floods recede; and iii) once people return to and rebuild their homes and restart productive activities. Free food is expected to phase out by June, apart from targeted disadvantaged groups/areas. FFW activities will be phased in i) to help in the recovery of productive/communal assets; and ii) to provide relief to families who have lost employment or are waiting for a 2nd harvest in August. Supplementary feeding with fortified foods for malnourished children and at risk pregnant/lactating women will be coordinated with the Ministry of Health and qualified NGOs. Unicef will work with WFP to monitor effective utilisation of supplementary food. Therapeutic feeding will also be coordinated with the Ministry of Health and Unicef.

Purchases of all commodities can be made either locally or regionally if donors provide cash contributions.

Performance Monitoring

Implementing partners with the assistance of WFP will report on:

  • food and nonfood item stocks, delivery and receipts;
  • beneficiary numbers by gender and age, % female headed households;
  • beneficiary participation (ESP women) in food planning, administration and distribution;
  • nutritional status of at risk groups;
  • results of FFW activities, distribution of benefits by gender; and
  • partnerships developed.

Nutritional Considerations and Food Basket

The free food ration is 500g maize, 50g pulses, 20g vegetable oil, 5g of salt and 20g sugar - all commodities are accepted by rural and urban populations. The FFW ration, also corresponding to the Food Fund agreement with the Government, is 500g of maize, 20g of pulses, 15g of vegetable oil, 5g of salt and 25g of sugar. Supplementary food will be given for 3 months to all vulnerable populations, especially to children under the age of five and pregnant and lactating women via qualified partners - the daily ration is 250g corn soya blend (CSB), 25g vegetable oil and 20g sugar. The individual therapeutic feeding ration, for 3 months, is 80g of dried skim milk (DSM), 60g of vegetable oil & 50g of sugar.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government institution: INGC

UN Agency: WFP

(v) Budget

Food
UN Agency
US$
Maize (43775 mt)*
Pulses (4378 mt)
Vegetable Oil (1581 mt)
Sugar (1994 mt)
Salt (506 mt)
CSB (592 mt)
DSE (19 mt)
Sub-total
Milling (maize)
Recovery/Rehabilitation Tools
Assessment and Follow-up
Transport (External/Internal)
Operation and Support Costs
WFP
7,879,500
1,970,100
1,581,000
638,080
75,900
201,280
72,200
12,418,060
437,750
50,000
330,000
9,339,769
5,861,607
Total
28,437,186
*(or cereal equivalent)

1.2 Emergency Road and Bridge repairs

(i) Objectives

This Special Operation for emergency road and bridge repairs will ensure the overland delivery of food and other assistance to flood affected people and reduce food delivery costs. These works will also help re-establish rural/urban overland traffic links. Duration is 6 weeks from the time of commencement.

(ii) Justification

Most of the critically hit areas are inaccessible by road, since entire sections of the main road network were washed away, secondary roads completely submerged. Mozambique's National Road Administration estimates that about 2,500 km of damaged tertiary roads. Beneficiaries, humanitarian aid personnel, food and non food items still need to be transported by air.

(iii) Strategy

WFP will work closely with the National Road Administration, the Directorate of Regional Roads, the National Institute of Disaster Management (INGC) and provincial authorities to identify the spots needing most urgent emergency repair and to mobilise provincial and local support. Capacity exists in the affected provinces to carry out most of the emergency repair work with private Mozambican companies and using labour based methods. Whenever feasible, food for work (FFW) will also be used and as comprehensive road damage assessments are finalised and the Government secures necessary donor funding, WFP will phase out its FFW inputs.

This Special Operation will fund 3 road engineers for 2 months, who will work very closely with the Government, to carry out emergency repairs on a total of 1,050 km of roads - viz, i) 550 km of light repairs of minor erosion damage; ii) 350 km of medium level repairs of substantial road surface loss; and iii) 150 km of high level repairs of blocked drains, culverts and severe erosion. Only essential repair work necessary to ensure the secure passage of vehicles will be carried out, and repair costs are based on preliminary estimates as provided by the National Road Administration. Areas in the Limpopo and Save River basins, in following provinces: Gaza- districts of Bilene, Chibuto, Chókwè, Guijá, Mabalane, Macia, Xai-Xai, Inhambane - district of Govuro, Maputo, districts of Boane, Magude, Manhiça, Marracuene, Matutuine, Moamba, Sofala - districts of Buzi, Chibabava, Machanga

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government: INGC

UN Agency: WFP

(v) Budget

Item/US$

Road repairs: 2,566,250
Consultants and related costs: 255,140
Operational and support costs: 441,988
Total: 3,263,378

1.3 Air transportation for emergency relief operations(WFP) - phase 1 for six weeks and phase II for one month

(i) Objectives

Hiring helicopters and fixed wing aircraft to ensure the search for and rescue of stranded flood victims and bring them to safer ground in Macia (Gaza province) and Save (on Sofala/Inhambane province border); and delivery of food and non food items (eg, water, medicines, clothes, shelter and equipment) for 650,000 people - rapid placement of health/sanitation supplies will help prevent an imminent cholera epidemic; and transport of humanitarian aid personnel to and from flood affected areas.

(ii) Justification

Following extensive flooding in February 2000 due to Cyclones Connie and Eline, WFP prepared a 6 month US$28.4 m emergency operation to provide food to 650,000 people (see above). This flood is unmatched in recorded history in its destruction.

(iii) Strategy

This Special Operation is in the flooded areas adjacent to the Limpopo and Save Rivers, viz, in the districts of Boane, Magude, Manhiça, Marracuene, Matutuine and Moamba (Maputo province), Bilene, Chibuto, Chókwè, Guijá, Mabalane, Macia and Xai-Xai (Gaza province), Búzi, Chibabava, and Machanga (Sofala province) and Govuro (Inhambane province). These are in areas targeted by WFP’s Vulnerability Assessment and Mapping (VAM) unit as most susceptible to food shortages and where people are chronically/seasonally food insecure.

There were initially 9 helicopters at the start of the relief effort - 5 from the SANDF, 2 from South African civil society and 2 from Malawian Government. This Special Operation allows the SANDF to increase its helicopter and fixed wing fleet fleet for 6 weeks (phase 1). Costs are based on SANDF and private sector proposals.

In addition as the military assets phase out and as road repairs may take longer than originally foreseen, it is essential that air transport of food and non-food continue in Maputo and Beira for a second phase of one month (April 2000). This will cover costs to extend some military support as well as to charter civilian fixed wing aircraft, cargo and passenger helicopters.

Both phases are a component of the overall relief effort in Mozambique coordinated by the emergency committee chaired by the Prime Minister and with representatives of key Ministries, INGC, donor countries, UN agencies (WFP, UNICEF, WHO, FAO, UNDP) and NGOs. WFP and INGC coordinate flight needs with the overall technical assistance from the OCHA/UNDAC team, Unicef and two professionals from the Department of International Development (DIFD). Military technical support has also been provided to the air cells in both Maputo and Beira.

WFP monitors flight needs and cargo deliveries with the Government, NGOs and airforce coordinators. Local authorities, WFP sub-offices and its 20 food aid monitors in the flood affected areas oversee the organisation of the rescue & relief operation.

(v) Responsibility for Implementation

Government: INGC

UN Agency: WFP

(vi) Budget

Phase I (6 weeks)

Item/US$

Aircraft, crew and navigation fees: 4,274,950
Operational and Support Costs: 1,084,156
Total: 5,359,106

Phase II (one month)

Item/US$

Aircraft, crew and navigation fees: 9,480,000
Operation and Support Costs: 1,513,842
Total: 10,993,842

2. Infrastructure

(i) Objective

The focus of the interventions of The Ministry of Public Works and Housing is on the following objectives:

  • restoration of transport road links between the capital and the rest of the country
  • re-opening roads between Mozambique and its neighbours
  • urgent repairs to the provincial and district administration buildings. This includes office furniture and equipment. Local administration will play a crucial role in the rehabilitation phase, when flood victims are registered to receive resettlement assistance. They are also expected to take the lead in the planning process and priority setting for the recovery phase.

A total of 75 administrative buildings will have to be rehabilitated, refurnished and equipped in the following provinces :

Maputo: 8 buildings
Gaza: 43 buildings
Inhambane: 12 buildings
Sofala:12 buildings

Severe damage also occurred to the energy sector. In fact, over 400km of power lines and 46 pylons were affected in Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala and Manica provinces. In Gaza alone 230 km of lines were disrupted. Urgent repairs require 14 million USD.

(ii) Justification

Major infrastructural damage occurred on roads, bridges, railways, the electricity network, hydraulic structures and administrative buildings. Damage to national roads, vital arteries for the functioning of rural and urban economies, had and is still having a particularly critical impact on the flood affected population.

(iii) Strategy

In view of the phasing out of the air operations, emergency repairs of the basic infrastructure are crucial for the successful implementation of the updated appeal. This applies in particular to the damaged road system. The National Road Administration has prepared an immediate intervention programme for the following provinces: Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala, Manica, Zambezia and Nampula. The programme encompasses: national highways, tertiary roads, municipal roads in Maputo, Matola, Xai-Xai and Chokwe.

The cost for interventions in the five most affected provinces: Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala and Manica amounts to: USD 25 million ( see table below). In the February appeal the amount for repairing vital access roads and bridges alone, leaving out hydraulic structures, railways, electric networks and urban resettlement, came to : 30.5 million.

As of 2 March, responses by EU member states to infrastructural requirements comprised pledges from: Denmark: 13 million US$ for electricity infrastructure in Gaza and Germany: 8 million US$ for infrastructural repairs.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government Responsible Institution: Ministry of Public Works and Housing, National Administration of Roads and Highways

(v) Budget

PROVINCES
US$
Maputo
11.470.000
Gaza
8.120.000
Inhambane
785.000
Sofala
3.290.000
Manica
2.230.000
TOTAL
25.895.000
Rehabilitation of buildings
ITEM
US$
Rehabilitation of public buildings
6,000,000
Office equipment
2,000,000
Vehicles
500,000
Radios
500,000
Office supplies/ furniture
1,200,000
TOTAL
10,200,000
The total cost of these two emergency repair and rehabilitation programmes amount to 36,095,000 US$. This requirement is covered by the contributions from Denmark, Germany and the World Bank, which will make available funds under its Roads and Coastal Shipping II Credit for Mozambique.

3. Health and Nutrition

(i) Objectives

The overall objective is:

  • To respond to the immediate health needs of the affected population, with particular attention to internally displaced people;
  • To prevent and control disease outbreaks; and
  • To support the immediate re-establishment of essential health services.

The specific objectives are:
  • To increase health system and community capacity to respond to the emergency
  • To prevent and treat waterborne diseases, such as cholera and other diarrhoeal diseases
  • To treat malaria cases among flood victims in a timely manner
  • To treat acute respiratory diseases in flood victims
  • To prevent epidemics of vaccine preventable diseases, such as meningitis and measles
  • To prevent and treat malnutrition among young children, and pregnant and lactating women;
  • To respond to the women and adolescents special health needs, especially in reproductive health.
  • To manage stress and other mental health issues.

(ii) Justification

Many of the affected areas remain without access to safe drinking water, adequate health care and nutrition, and other basic services. Thousands are still in need of urgent assistance to meet their basic needs – food, safe water, shelter, health care, sanitation, etc. Of the 650,000 people in need of humanitarian assistance, about 130,000 are children under the age of five who are very vulnerable to disease and malnutrition. According to Government’s estimates, more than 250,000 of the 650,000 are internally displaced living in about 99 camps in Gaza, Maputo, Inhambane and Sofala Provinces. Of these, 50,000 are displaced children under the age of five.

Malaria continues to be the main cause of morbidity and mortality in flood affected areas. Those who are most vulnerable are children and pregnant women. Cholera cases have been reported and the risk of an outbreak is high. Other major threats are measles, meningitis and dysentery. Respiratory infections, skin diseases, conjunctivitis and diarrhea are already a problem in camps. The impact of malaria, inadequate diet and diarrhea, as well as the exhaustion from displacement have combined to increase the already high rates of moderate and severe malnutrition among young children. The fact that the secure environment is suddenly destroyed creates a collective stressful condition to be addressed.

Out of the affected population, 400,000 are women at reproductive age (15-49 yrs old). These women have special and urgent needs to be taken care of. Taking into account that Mozambique has one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world with 1,059 per 100,000 live births, these women require special attention and urgent care to ensure safe delivery.

The fact that under-nourished women have been exposed to trauma and cold and wet conditions for a period of time constitute a risk for pre-mature births, under-weight babies and complications with lactation. In addition, in emergency situation, women are more subjected to social violence and sexual abuse, and therefore, this brings higher vulnerability and incidence of STDs and HIV infections.

Health infrastructure, equipment and consumables were destroyed during the flooding and cyclone. A number of temporary health posts have been set-up in the various camps to cope with the increased health care needs. Preliminary assessments estimate that some 50 rural and urban health centres and 4 referral hospitals were seriously damaged or destroyed in Gaza, Maputo, Sofala and Inhambane. Numerous health posts were also destroyed. Additional human resources have been deployed to provide emergency health services. In spite of all these efforts, the services remain inadequate. As the displaced people start to return to their home areas, it is also becoming urgent to re-establish health services which were destroyed.

UN Response to date:

For programming purpose, UN agencies have divided their emergency interventions into two phases: (i) phase I – Relief Operations (Feb.- Mar.); and (ii) phase II -Immediate Re-establishment of Essential Health Services (Apr. – Sep.) The UN support has addressed the followings needs:

  • Coordination mechanisms at national and provincial levels,
  • Technical assistance at national and provincial level for planning emergency responses (Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane and Sofala),
  • Drugs supplies for control and treatment of malaria, cholera and other illnesses,
  • Supplies of safe delivery kits including individual, health centers/posts kits, and caesarian sections kits,
  • Development of contingency plan and guidelines to prevent and treat malaria, as well as support to spraying of insecticide in camps,
  • Support to a vaccination campaign and vitamin A supplementation,
  • Strengthening of cholera preparedness and prevention activities,
  • Development of plan for social mobilization/education and training of "activistas",
  • Rapid health needs assessment in affected areas,
  • Development of plan action for nutrition surveillance,
  • Financial support to the Ministry of Health to increase the number of health workers in the emergency areas, and cover recurrent costs of local health authorities,
  • Support the setting up and management of an Information Center for planning emergency health interventions.

(iii) Strategy

The areas of interventions are:

1. Support to coordination

2. Health Information System including rapid alert system:

  • Communication network for text and data transmission,
  • Health and nutrition needs of affected population,
  • Health system capacity to respond to the emergency

3. Disease prevention and control
  • Environmental health
  • Epidemics preparedness and response
  • Immunization
  • STD/HIV/AIDS
  • Mental Health in emergency situation
  • Community mobilization / Social communication

4. Treatment of common illnesses especially malaria, diarrhoeal diseases, acute respiratory infections;

5. Prevention and treatment of malnutrition among young children

  • Treatment of severe malnutrition
  • Supplementary feeding and prevention of micronutrients deficiency,
  • Growth monitoring and surveillance

6. Reproductive health:
  • Pre and post natal care and obstetrics care,
  • Provision micronutrients
  • Family planning,

7. Re-equipping and rehabilitation of health facilities damaged by floods and cyclone:
  • Replenishment of drugs and other consumables
  • Provision of health equipment
  • Cleanup and minor repairs of health facilities
  • Provision of tents to set-up temporary health units while health facilities are being rehabilitated.

8. Institutional Support to Health Authorities
  • An inter-agency team of technical advisers to support emergency and reconstruction efforts;
  • Redeployment / recruitment of additional staff;
  • Logistics (radio and tel. communications, transport, etc.) and other operational support to local authorities to cope with the additional workload

(iv) Responsible for Implementation

Government Responsible Institution: MISAU

The responsible UN agencies are WHO, UNICEF and UNFPA.

UN support aims to strengthen national capacity to implement and coordinate humanitarian assistance. The appealing agencies will work primarily through national counterparts and local authorities using existing coordination mechanisms under the umbrella of the National Institution for Disaster Management (INGC). The agencies will work in partnership with a number of NGOs (Red Cross, MSF, SCF-UK, IMC, Irish Concern, Caritas) currently operating in the emergency.

  • WHO will continue to provide overall co-ordination of UN support in the health and nutrition sector. Its support to the emergency operations will be primarily in the form of technical assistance (diseases prevention and control, coordination, planning, nutrition and mental health), and the strengthening of epidemiological surveillance.
  • UNICEF will provide leadership in the areas of Child Health and Nutrition. This will include procurement of essential drugs, supplies and equipment of re-establishing health services, including for rural hospitals. It will also play a role in the prevention and control of outbreaks of diseases (measles, malaria and cholera). UNICEF will support in collaboration with WHO the provision of supplies for the treatment of severely malnourished children; the provision of micronutrient supplements through health facilities; growth monitoring, nutrition surveillance and support to nutrition; monitoring of the distribution of supplementary food in collaboration with WFP
  • UNFPA will provide leadership in Reproductive Health Care, including the prevention and management of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs) and HIV/AIDS. Its support consists of provision of supplies, equipment to replace the ones damaged and technical assistance to local authorities.

(v) Budget Requirement per area of Intervention
ACTIVITIES
Budget in USD
WHO
UNICEF
UNFPA
Coordination (Support to coordination mechanisms at provincial and central levels)
140,000
-
-
Health information system : (Establishment of surveillance system including equipment):
250,000
-
-
Re-establishment of essential preventive & curative services
- Drugs & supplies
- Equipment
- Cleaning and minor rehabilitation
- Operation costs, including additional staff
600,000
-
-
180,000
610,000
670,000
150,000
80,000
-
-
-
-
Emergency RH/Delivery Kits for Camps
-
-
85,000
Re-establishment of maternal and obstetric care services
- Drugs and supplies
- Equipment
- Cleaning and minor rehabilitation
-
-
-
-
-
-
150,000
300,000
150,000
Disease prevention & control
- Vaccination
- Malaria
- Cholera
- STDs and HIV
25,000
25,000
445,000
25,000
970,000
440,000
-
-
-
-
-
100,000
Mental health in emergency situation
75,000
-
-
Community mobilization / education
180,000
-
-
Nutrition
- Technical assistance - Nutrition
- Provision of Therapeutic F75/F100 Milk, Resomal
- Procurement of micronutrients
- Operational costs - distribution of BP-5 high energy biscuits - NGO contracts
- Operation costs - treatment of severely malnourished
50,000
-
-
-

-
50,000
200,000
20,000
80,000

150,000
-
-
-
-

-
Institutional support to health authorities
(Technical assistance, logistic support, operation costs, office equipment and supplies)
260,000
380,000
170,000
Field operation costs

317,900

UN agencies HQs support costs
135,300
200,000
47,750
Total Of Agencies Activities
2,390,300
4,317,900
1,002,750
Total contributions received (confirmed)
422,000
3,287,216
71,000
% Funded against Revised Appeal Target
18%
76%
7%
Net Requirements / Shortfall
1,968,300
1,030,684
931,750
4. Education

(i) Objective

  • To re-establish basic education services for children directly affected by floods and cyclones
  • To restore normalcy into children’s lives and provide psycho-social support.
  • To support DPEs in the re-establishment of conditions that allow for a return to optimal conditions of teaching and learning in the seven secondary and two technical schools in the shortest possible time.
  • To undertake health promotion campaign involving schools for displaced and affected children.

(ii) Justification

Preliminary estimates prepared by the Ministry of Education indicate that the flooding in the provinces of Gaza, Maputo, Manica, Sofala and Inhambane has dislocated over 200,000 primary and secondary pupils. Failure to make good the damages to plant and materials as part of the emergency response threatens to reverse the gains achieved by the education sector since the war both in terms of enrolment and learning achievement.

The number of primary schools affected, as reported by the Ministry of Education is as follows:

Provinces
No of Schools
Schools affected
Pupils
Teachers
Gaza
267
42%
70,770
924
Inhambane
22
4%
4,730
114
Manica
53
16%
10,207
242
Maputo City
201
73%
47,539
619
Maputo Province
16
13%
41,266
678
Sofala
98
26%
35,324
592
Total
657 schools affected
% schools
209,836 pupils
3,169 teachers
The number of secondary school pupils in the areas affected is 3,944 in 9 schools, including 2 ETP. There are 162 teachers in these schools. The total number of classrooms is: 33 of cement construction, and 6 of local materials.

Initial Response phase I

UNICEF is providing support to MINED to restore learning in schools to the levels that prevailed prior to the flood emergency. UNESCO is supporting the provision of an educational architect to assist in school the assessment and where necessary the re-design of school construction and rehabilitation plans.

In addition, UNESCO will provide support for the re-establishment of optimum conditions for learning and teaching in secondary schools. WFP is making provision for food-for-work resources to be used for cleaning and minor repairs to schools within the emergency period. These food and non food resources are included in the requirements for WFP’s food assistance.

UNICEF has pre-positioned teaching and learning materials, as well cleaning tools, for the immediate re-establishment of the education system in flood-affected areas. An education specialist has been deployed to Gaza to work with the Provincial Directorate of Education on the immediate re-establishment of the education system. A consultancy firm has already been contracted to carryout a rapid needs assessment of damaged schools (when floods subside).

(iii) Strategy

The plan for the re-establishment of basic education (Phase II)

  • Co-ordination of relief activities. A task force has been established, linking key departments in MINED (DNEB, Planning, and the Finance Directorates), and key international agencies (UNICEF, UNESCO, WFP, and the World Bank). Integration of NGO support is envisaged at provincial level.
  • Rapid and ongoing assessment. UNICEF provided technical support for a rapid assessment of the overall situation in Gaza and Inhambane provinces. This is being broadened to include the other provinces affected. The numbers of children, teachers and schools will be verified. Information will also be provided with regard to the status of schools and their readiness for re-opening as the water subsides. Communication networks will be assessed, particularly with regard to roads and bridges for the movement of school materials. Assessment of damage to schools for re-construction will be the subject of a further more in-depth assessment. In the meantime information will be provided on where tents are required.
  • Provide technical assistance to provincial authorities to restore normalcy into children’s lives through psycho-social support. There are already developed means for reaching traumatised children in Mozambique. UNICEF will provide technical assistance support to provincial and local authorities to counsel young children, and their parents. This will be integrated with the provision of shelter, and the re-establishment of schools.
  • Provision of learning materials for primary schools. Concurrently with assessments and procurement activities, learning materials in MINED warehouses are being provided in the affected provinces. These are being shipped from Maputo airport, as well as the sea port, and stored in provincial warehouses. This action also has the advantage of clearing space in Maputo for materials under procurement locally, and abroad. Similarly text books and student material for secondary and technical schools will be pre-positioned with UNESCO support.
  • Investigation into the implementation of teacher support arrangements. The aim of this investigation is to identify actions to assist teachers to normalise their domestic condition in affected areas. These actions may include recommendations concerning grants or small loans. UNESCO will support this activity.
  • Provision of cleaning and learning materials for primary school children, teachers and schools. The flood has affected about 29 percent of schools in the six provinces. UNICEF will provide basic cleaning materials for 1,300 classrooms (buckets, mops, disinfectant, soap). This exercise will be undertaken in conjunction with health and environmental sanitation authorities. In order to get children back to school as soon as possible, learning materials for 209,836 children, materials for 3,169 teachers, and equipment for 657 will be purchased and distributed through the UNICEF/MINED distribution system. To streamline the anticipated large volume of goods, logistical support will be provided to the worst-affected provinces. This will include a truck, two pick-up vehicles and three motorcycles. In addition short-term support will be provided to the various warehouses to increase their capacities (daily-paid labour, fuel, funds for hiring additional transport). The distribution system is currently being reviewed with technical support from a local consulting firm. WFP will provide food-for-work and minimum rehabilitation materials for destroyed secondary schools in collaboration with UNESCO (129 secondary schools), while UNICEF will provide similar materials for primary schools direct to provincial and local authorities (district and school committees).
  • Promotion of school health, including hygiene promotion, education and training, as well as de-worming of children and provision of vitamins will be undertaken in collaboration with the water and health sectors with UNICEF support. Financial provision is being made through these channels, but some funds will be provided to local and district authorities to procure technical assistance, supplies and equipment where necessary. In addition, the support of NGOs will be integrated to increase the capacity to respond urgently.
  • Provision of temporary classrooms and teacher accommodation. UNICEF will provide approximately 80 tents to substitute destroyed classrooms in primary schools, while UNESCO will martial support for about 16 tents for secondary classrooms. In addition budget provision has been made for temporary shelters (tents and tarpaulins) where necessary.
  • Technical and material assistance for provincial education departments in the planning, design and implementation of reconstruction programmes (including support to articulation of governmental and NGO activity in rural community development and poverty alleviation).

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government: MINED

UN agencies: Unicef, Unesco, WFP

UNICEF is working together with UNESCO and WFP in the area of restoration of educational services. Its support will be primarily in the provision of learning and teaching materials for primary schools, small repairs and cleaning supplies, and institutional support to local educational authorities. UNESCO is mobilising support and resources for refurbishment at secondary level, including replacement of teaching/learning materials. In addition technical assistance will be provided and resources mobilised to strengthen capacity at provincial level. WFP will provide food-for-work to facilitate cleaning of schools, and also re-construction/rehabilitation at secondary level.

(v) Budget (Phase I and II)

UNICEF/UNESCO Support Programme

Description
UNICEF
UNESCO
US $
Basic learning materials, 209,836 primary pupils
795,278

795,278
Textbooks and learning materials, 2,280 sec pupils

28,200
28,200
Teaching materials, 3,169 primary school teachers
10,204

10,204
Teaching materials, 129 sec school teachers

38,800
38,800
School equipment, 657 primary schools
684,923

684,923
School equipment, 9 second level schools

27,000
27,000
Supplies for cleaning 1,300 prim school classroom
48,257

48,257
80 Tents for temporary primary schools
400,000

400,000
16 Tents for temporary secondary schools

11,500
11,500
Rapid Assessment
40,000

40,000
Investigation into teacher support arrangements

18,000
18,000
Support to local educational authorities (office supplies, technical assistance, temporary shelters)
396,338
28,000
424,338
Total
2,375,000
151,500
2,526,500
Logistics and Support Operations
198,900

198,900
HQs support costs
125,000
11,000
136,000
Total
2,698,900
162,500
2,8861,400
Total contributions rcvd. (confirmed)
1,297,111


% Funded Against Rev. Appeal Target
48%


Net Requirements / Shortfall
1,583,489


5. Child Protection and Advocacy

(i) Objective

  • Ensure protection and care of children affected by the floods, with particular attention to unaccompanied children
  • Support the development of mapping and information database with a view to facilitate planning, monitoring and co-ordination.
  • Advocate to increase the understanding of donors and media of the impact of the floods on children, women and families

(ii) Justification

Children have borne the brunt of the flooding and emergency in Mozambique: through their health, nutrition, loss of education, and for many, loss of caregivers. Hundreds of children were separated from their families during the rescue operations and are currently being cared for in temporary shelters. Some have already being reunited with their parents through natural processes as the floods subside, but others remain in IDP camps, being cared for by other families and religious organisations.

The responsibility for ensuring at community level that children and women are having their rights to protection and care met - including shelter - lies with the Ministry for Women’s Affairs and Coordination of Social Action. The human and material resource capacity of this Ministry at provincial and district levels has always been weak: a problem seriously exacerbated in Gaza and, to a smaller extent in Maputo province, Inhambane and Sofala, with damage to offices and equipment. The Gaza provincial directorate for Women’s Affairs and Coordination of Social Action, one of UNICEF key partners, was in the lower part of Xai Xai, and was totally flooded, with all equipment, materials, files, etc either destroyed or irreparable. Whilst it is not yet possible to undertake a full assessment, it is known that at district level, many of the offices of DPCAS have been severely affected by the floods.

Response to date (Phase I)


Child Protection

A UNICEF child protection officer was assigned to work with the Gaza Provincial Directorate for Women’s Affairs and Coordination of Social Action and NGOs to develop a strategy and plan for family reunification> UNICEF provided supplies and materials, including Polaroid cameras and film, tracing forms, stationary, and funding for fuel and transport to the province to commence the reunification of separated children with their families.

Mapping & Information

From the onset of the emergency in early February, UNICEF developed a mapping and information data base on affected populations and interventions. This information – has been used extensively by the INGC and by the health and water/sanitation sectoral working group for operational planning. UNICEF has also invested heavily in supporting advocacy actions to increase the understanding of donors and media (national and international) of the impact of the floods on children, women and families.

(iii) Strategy

During phase II, UNICEF will continue to provide technical support to the Provincial Directorate for Women’s Affairs and Coordination of Social Action in Gaza, and also in Inhambane on family reunification. It will also work with this Ministry to establish community-level monitoring mechanisms on basic social indicators about families and communities as they start to return to their villages and towns and re-establish lives. In addition to this, as part of post-disaster psychological recovery, a process of working with children for them to "tell their story" about the floods, the impact on their lives, and their aspirations for the future will be developed with this Ministry and NGOs including the Foundation for Community Development (FDC) and the Eduardo Mondlane Foundation.

In order to ensure that the Provincial Directorate for Women’s Affairs and Coordination of Social Action in Gaza and all its district offices can fully assume their post-flood community level social action responsibilities, UNICEF will provide funding for rehabilitation of a new provincial office and for cleaning up and minor repairs of damaged district level offices along with operating and office equipment and supplies, including transport.

(ii) Responsibility for Implementation

Government: MISAU

UN agencies: Unicef

(v) Budget

Description
Budget (US$)
Family Reunification
-Purchase of Polaroid Cameras and films
- Protection and Care of Displaced Children
- Stationary
- Logistics, transport, fuel, DSA
(i) Sub- Total
-
6,000
82,200
500
4,000
92,700
Advocacy to Mobilise Support for Children
- Mapping, data collection and reporting (technical assistance)
- Public Information/report writing/photographer
- Logistic support and transport
(ii) Sub-Total
-
70,000
30,000
10,000
110,000
Support to DPCAS:
- Office Stationery
- Office Equipment and shelter materials for affected social workers and other providers
- Vehicles
. 4 x Toyota Hilux 4 x 4
. 16 Yamaha 125 cc motorcycles(5 for provincial office and 11 for districts)
. Bicycles
(iii) Sub-total
-
150,000
60,000
-
100,000
40,000
4,500
354,500
Total
557,200
HQs - programme support costs (5%)
25,000
Logistics and field Operations support costs
39,950
Grand Total
622,150
Total contributions received (confirmed)
218,739
% Funded against Revised Appeal Target
35%
Net Requirements / Shortfall
403,411
6. Gender Equity and Women Concerns

(i) Objective

Specific actions should be taken firstly to respond to the specific needs of flood affected women and adolescents girls, secondly to minimise the negative effects of their vulnerability, and lastly to help them to return to their normal daily life. Particular attention and priority will be given to women heads of families and widows with children.

(ii) Justification

In emergency situations, women are represented as part of statistical data of affected population. Many of the planned interventions cover women to ensure better living conditions for their families and children. In many instances, it is assumed that women will be equal beneficiaries to men. However, considering the prevailing gender-based discrimination, it expected that women will have less chance as direct beneficiaries, and their basic needs will be marginalized. Similarly, in emergency situation, adolescents girls are much more vulnerable to discrimination and marginalisation in favor of their brothers.

Considering the high vulnerability of women and young girls to gender-based violence, sexual abuse and social discrimination in normal circumstances, it is expected that this situation will be worse under the present conditions of emergency. In addition to the psychological trauma, and in the era of HIV/AIDS and STDs, this will mean higher susceptibility to these diseases.

As women are the main care takers of her families and her children, secure basic daily needs, and considering that women had specific needs, not only as human beings, but also due to their nature as women, it is very fundamental that the women in affected areas, particularly displaced women, will receive adequate support to regain their normal way of life as soon as possible. Under the prevailing absolute poverty, this action is essential to secure the recovery of affected families and save the dignity of women and adolescent girls.

(iii) Strategy

In direct collaboration with local women NGOs and groups, UNFPA will support mobilisation activities, firstly within accommodation camps, then later at community level, targeting women and young girls among the displaced.

This includes:

  • provision of specially designed kits to help women to return to their daily life;
  • health education activities (hygiene and RH/STDs);
  • counseling support and orientation to possible assistance offered within the different relief interventions;
  • provision of micro start-up funds or tools for women to recuperate their orginal income for their daily basic needs.

The beneficiaries are mainly displaced women from rural and peri-urban affected areas of Gaza, Maputo, Inhambane and Sofala provinces. Particular attention and priority will be given to women heads of families and widows with children.

(iv) Responsible for Implementation

Government Institution: Ministry of Women Affairs and Coordination of Social Action

Responsible UN agency: UNFPA

Fundação para o Desenvolvimento da Comunidade

National Women NGOs and local women associations and groups

(v) Budget

The budget requirements are US$ 840,000 (including Agency support costs).

7. Water, Sanitation and Environment

7.1 Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion:

(i) Objectives

  • Re-establish water supply systems in 29 flood-affected towns and settlements;
  • Support environmental sanitation through the construction of latrines and major cleanup operations in flooded towns;
  • Chlorinate and disinfect water sources;
  • Support a hygiene promotion campaign;
  • Strengthen local capacity to plan, respond, coordinate, and monitor emergency and reconstruction interventions in the water sector; and
  • Continue support to internally displaced people in the provision of emergency water supply and sanitation;

(ii) Justification

Many of the affected areas are still without access to safe drinking water and sanitation facilities. Although water supplies in Maputo and Motola cities are coming back to normal much work still need to be done the Incomati, Limpopo, Save and Buzi valleys where flooding is very extensive. To date a total of 29 townships and small scale rural water systems in Gaza, Maputo and Inhambane Provinces have been affected in one way or the other and many are currently under water with serious damage to pumping and treatment works. In addition wells and boreholes etc. are flooded and latrine faclilities in rural settlements have either been flooded or in many cases completely washed away.

Sanitation and hygiene are a problem in all flooded areas, increasing the number of cases of diarrhea and other communicable diseases and the risk of a cholera outbreak.. A few confirmed cases of cholera have already been reported in the Provinces of Maputo and Sofala. The mosquito-friendly environment caused by stagnant flood water and poor sanitation, combined with the high concentration of people in displaced settlements, have significantly increased the number of malaria cases – reports show at least three times higher than normal cases of malaria in flooded areas.

(ii) UN Response

Response to Date ( Phase I - Relief Operations)

UNICEF’s support has helped to increase access to safe water in the various temporary shelters through the provision of water bladders, water purification plants and tablets, and chlorination of contaminated water sources. It has delivered jerricans, buckets and bars of soap to displaced people. Support was also given to the DNA (Office for Low Cost Sanitation) for the construction of latrines in temporary and new settlement areas in Maputo Province and Matola city. Hygiene promotion is being supported in all camps. UNICEF has, through OXFAM supported the repair of 28 wells in the Limpopo valley.

In terms of institutional support, a UNICEF water supply and sanitation engineer has been deployed to Gaza Province to work with the provincial directorate for Public Works. The number of field staff has now been increased to five to respond to the rehabilitation needs of the water sector, and also to intensify the distribution of supplies and promotion of hygiene and environmental sanitation. In addition, at the request of the Government and NGO partners, UNICEF has been leading, since the beginning of the emergency, the coordination of emergency interventions in the water and sanitation sector.

WHO
In the framework of the emergency, the Sanitary Engineers Team of WHO, in collaboration with the Department of Environmental Health and the Provincial Director of Maputo and Gaza carried out a rapid assessment in Maputo and Gaza Provinces. Using this data and the data from assessment reports of Inhambane and Sofala, the developed a Terms of Reference (TOR)

The team also elaborated a work plan for the implementation of the TOR in the 4 provinces

They provided technical and material support to 90,000 families to build latrines and houses using local material with the participation of Internal Displaced People (IDP). They also provided these families with water supply and impregnated mosquito nets.

In the 2nd Phase, a proposal for the integration of 130,000 families in developmental activities of the country, "shelter, latrines, water, sanitation and vector control" has been developed.

(iii) Strategy

The plan for the Rehabilitation of Water Services.

Rapid and ongoing assessment: Support for the completion of a) a rapid assessment of the overall situation with respect to the water supply and sanitation facilities that have been damaged by the flooding at approximately 29 township and rural settlements and the elaboration of a plan to rapidly bring back on line these facilities and b) ongoing assessments in the rural areas affected by the flood as the waters recede and the subsequent development of action plans to repair and or replace these facilities as appropriate

Chlorination and disinfection of water supplies: The procurement and distribution of chlorination and "Chloro-floc water makers" for emergency water supplies and for rehabilitation support. It is estimated that some 20 tonnes of Chlorine powder will be required and some 350,000 "water maker" sachets

Hygiene promotion, education and training: The design, development and immediate implementation of a hygiene promotion campaign, focussing on personal hygiene and cholera prevention and management, initially in the temporary accommodation centres and as people begin to move home, in the cities of Chokwe and Xai-Xai, smaller urban centres and rural areas. Costs also include for the redeployment, salaries and per diem costs of sanitation animators to the flood affected areas.

Provision of sanitation facilities: Reconstruction and or rehabilitation of sanitation facilities lost to the flooding. Strengthening of capacities in the Low Cost Sanitation Construction Projects’ (PLMs) capacity to respond to increased demands for accelerated reconstruction of sanitation facilities.

Environmental cleanup operations in Chokwe and Xai-Xai: In conjunction with the local authorities support for the clean-up of the social infrastructure, hospitals, schools, civic buildings, some roads and drains, and the appropriate disposal of dead animals etc. Supplies for this will include shovels, brushes, rakes, wheelbarrows, protective clothing, disinfectant, tractors and tipping trailers etc.

Emergency water supplies: In the immediate short term support for the provision of supplies and equipment to ensure safe water supplies and sanitation facilities in the temporary accommodation centres and in the cities of Chokwe and Xai-Xai. Typically this would comprise of the provision of water purification plant, jerricans, water bladders, the transport and distribution of water, the provision of temporary communal standposts, generators and well cleaning equipment.

Rehabilitation and restoration of damaged water and sanitation facilities: This includes for the procurement of supplies and equipment, electric pumps, handpumps, spare parts pipes, electrical switchgear, piping, cabling, and so on, to replace those damaged in the flooding, for all costs associated with labour, transport and other operational costs associated with the rehabilitation of these facilities and where appropriate for the procurement of technical assistance services.

Institutional Support:

Repair and replacement of supplies and equipment lost to the local authorities as a result of the flooding;

- Logistics and operational support to provincial authorities;

Technical Assistance to deliver the emergency and rehabilitation response.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government Responsible Institution: MOPH

Partner UN Agency: UNICEF/WHO

The UN System’s approach is to strengthen national, in particular local capacity to plan, implement and monitor emergency and rehabilitation interventions in the Water and Sanitation. Implementation of some of the planned activities will continue to require a close partnership with NGOs and the private sector.

The activities of UNICEF and WHO will complement each other in that WHO intend to focus their support in those areas to which people will be permanently resettled as a result of having being displaced due to the flooding. This is with the exception of the environmental clean-up operations where UNICEF will focus immediate attention in the cities of Xai-Xai and Chokwe with WHO focussing on Xai-Xai, Beira, Inhambane and Maputo.

4.0 Budget

Description of inputs
UNICEF Revised Appeal Budget US$
WHO Revised Appeal Budget US$
Total
Rapid and ongoing assessmens
100,000
75,000
175,000
Chlorination and disinfection of water supplies
150,000
----
150,000
Hygiene promotion, education and training
150,000
75,000
225,000
Provision of sanitation facilities
450,000
----
450,000
Emergency water supplies
320,000
----
320,000
Rehabilitation and restoration of damaged water supplies
1,700,000
----
1,700,000
Construction of wells in new settlement areas in Xai-Xai and other district centres.

800,000
800,000
Environmental clean-up operations in Chokwe and Xai-Xai (UNICEF), Xai-Xai, Beira, Inhambane and Maputo (WHO)
250,000
200,000
450,000
Replacement of equipment and supplies of provincial and municipal authorities and logistical support
200,000
---
200,000
Technical Assistance to deliver emergency/rehabilitation response
200,000
50,000
250,000
Total
3,520,000
1,200,000
4,720,000
Logistics and field operations support costs
293,250
87,600
380,850
HQs support costs
176,000

176,000
Grand Total -
3,989,250
1,287,600
5,276,850
Total contributions rcvd. (confirmed)
3,372,000
60,000

% Funded against revised Appeal target
85%
5%

Shortfall /Funding Gap
617,250
1,227,600

7.2 Emergency Water Supply System and Sanitation

(i) Objective

To identify and respond to community needs in flood affected areas regarding the setting up of emergency water supply systems and sanitation. Approximately 80,000 inhabitants will benefit from the emergency water supply system and sanitation in Xai-Xai and Chókwe areas. The project aims to solve immediate problems of water and sanitation, securing safe water supply and basic sanitation in order to reduce the incidence of diarrhoeal diseases, including cholera. The Project proposes to build 10 protected hand-dug wells per area with concrete well rings and 2 water pumps; protect springs with infiltration and settlement thanks, taps, and; build 100 community latrines per area. The time frame of the project is April to August, 2000.

(ii) Justification

According to national estimations, more than two million people were affected by the floods half of whom are in dire need of assistance. Xai-Xai and Chókwe in Gaza Province are the most affected towns in the country. In both areas the water supply systems are no longer operational and it is estimated that more than 25,000 inhabitants in Xai-Xai and 65,000 in Chókwe that slowly are coming back to the place will be suffering soon for the lack of available potable water. An assessment carried out by UNEP and UNCHS (Habitat) showed that the most immediate effect of the floods on the environment is sanitation. There is a critical water shortage and people are relying on dirty pools of water left behind by the residing floods and all the sanitation systems are broken down. Therefore, a rapid response should be implemented in order to reduce the risks of spreading diseases in the areas.

(iii) Strategy

This intervention builds on UNEP and UNCHS (Habitat) comparative advantages and previous experiences in building the capacity of specific target groups in emergency cases of sanitation and water supply in close collaboration with beneficiary communities. The project aims to address high-risk environmental conditions in both towns, The strategy used will aim to build social capital, which besides addressing immediate needs will contribute to a long-term approach to sustainable infrastructure development. To ensure the sustainability the project will establish community maintenance and management capacity for the water points and latrines and develop hygiene programmes in both areas of intervention. The project will also support local partners to intervene in the water/sanitation sector in collaboration with local authorities and representatives of Health and Public Works Ministries.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government Responsible Institution: MOPH

Partner UN agency: UNEP, UNCHS (Habitat)

(v) Budget

Funds Requested: US$ 699,780

Xai-Xai Town

Budget Item
US$
Construction of 10 hand-pumps (x 12.000)
120,000
Provision/installation of 2 motor pumps (x 6,000)
12,000
Construction of 5 public fountains (x 1,000)
5,000
Construction of 100 community latrines (x 1,000)
100,000
Transport Costs
20,000
Technical Support and transport
55,000
Manuals/Dissemination and training
5,000
Support to community
10,000
Administrative Costs (7%)
22,890
Total
349,890
Chókwe Town
Budget Item
US$
Construction of 10 hand-pumps (x 12.000)
120,000
Provision/installation of 2 motor pumps (x 6,000)
12,000
Construction of 5 public fountains (x 1,000)
5,000
Construction of 100 community latrines (x 1,000)
100,000
Transport Costs
20,000
Technical Support and transport
55,000
Manuals/Dissemination and training
5,000
Support to community
10,000
Administrative Costs (7%)
22,890
Total
349,890
7.3 Environment Assessment and Waste Disposal

(i) Objective

In order to avoid further environmental disaster, the Project aims to assess the state of the environment in these areas and prepare a strategy for urgent intervention to assist the on-going resettlement of the population either in their original areas or in new settlements. According to the request of the Government priority will be given to the waste disposal issues and preventing measures for disaster avoidance.

The immediate objective is to assess the state of environment in areas affected by floods in order to propose urgent measures for assisting resettlement in the areas.

(ii) Justification

The immediate environmental concern of then recent floods is the release of pollutants into the environment. When towns are flooded a cocktail of pollutants are released into the environment depending on the activities in the town. UNEP and UNCHS assessment in the affected area showed that the flooding of the agricultural town of Chokwe released an unknown amount of agrochemical from warehouses into the environment. The study also indicated that other pollutants released into the environment such as oils from service stations, human wastes, dead animals, battery wastes worsened the situation. The critical issue is that residents are returning to their homes where the effects of the pollution are still not known and there is no reliable water supply systems and sanitation facilities. Furthermore, it was observed that families are using water from pools of dirty water left by the receding floods. It is estimated that 350,000 people will be coming back to their original areas and the Government has embarked on an ambitious programme that will provide them with assistance.

(iii) Strategy

This Project builds on UNEP and UNCHS (Habitat) comparative advantages and previous experiences in flood assessment for rapid intervention. The Project will be developed in a close collaboration with the Ministry of Co-ordination for the Environment and local authorities. Because of the toxic nature of some wastes (especially agrochemicals) and expert on the disposal of chemical wastes will be involved in the project.

(iii) Responsibility for Implementation

Government: Ministry of Co-ordination of the Environment, Public Works and Housing.

UN Agency: UNEP, UNCHS (Habitat)

(iv) Budget

Activity
US$
Environmental Assessment Component
Assessment of State of Environment in Xai Xai and Chokwe and other 2 towns either in Limpopo , Save and Imbeluzi basins, Preparation of a strategy
150 000
Preparation of environmental impact assessments for 9 new proposed resettlement areas in the country
90 000
Technical assistance and travel
60 000
Transport, DSA and other
50 000
Total
350 000

Waste disposal Component
Preparation of strategy 30 000
Disposal of waste 200 000
Technical Assistance 30 000
Total 260 000

Total of the Project
610,000
8. Shelter

(i) Objective

The objectives are 1) to provide temporary shelter in accomodation centers to people internally displaced as result of the floods and the cyclone; 2) to provide the most effective and practical resettlement assistance to families that have lost or suffered severe damage to their house due to the floods and cyclone Eline that occurred throughout Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala and Manica provinces.

(ii) Justification

350.000 people in the provinces of Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala and Manica have been displaced from their villages and neighborhoods damaged by severe flooding or cyclone Eline. Many of these people have lost their livelihood (crops), their savings (stored food and livestock) and their homes Immediate basic shelter in accommodation centers is required to protect people from adverse weather conditions, avoid out-break of disease and provide minimum conditions for human dignity.

As soon as conditions permit, the internally displaced population will return either to their original villages and neighborhoods or to newly defined resettlement areas. A resettlement package will be required to enable the displaced population to return to their homes or resettlement areas and begin rebuilding their lives and livelihoods.

(iii) Strategy

  • Supply of 4000 large tents for the use of dispensaries and field health units, storage facilities for perishables.
  • Supply of 4000 medium and small size tents for support teams and family accommodation.
  • Supply of 4375 rolls of plastic sheeting for the accommodation of 70.000 families.
  • Supply of 210,000 blankets ( 3 per family)
  • Supply of 200 riverboats with engines for rescue operations and for the delivery of resettlement materials to assist people in isolated areas.
  • Supply of 70,000 resettlement packages for displaced people returning to their areas of origin or to newly identified resettlement areas
  • Identification of new resettlement areas and allotment of family plots for housing.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government: INGC for shelter in accommodation center

MAE ( through local administration) in collaboration with MOPH, MICOA and MICAS for the resettlement of the internally displaced population

UN Agency: UNDP

The program for providing shelter in the accommodation centers will be coordinated by the INGC and UNDP. Implementation will be carried out in collaboration with the Cruz Vermelha de Moçambique (CVM) – The Red Cross of Mozambique , national and international NGOs, UNICEF, WFP and WHO.

MAE and UNDP will coordinate the Resettlement of Displaced People Programme in close collaboration with MOPH, MICOA and MICAS. Implementation will be carried out in close coordination with the local authorities, NGOs, and the local private sector.

(iv) Budget requirements

Item
Implementing agency
Budget US$
Contributions received
Required
Shelter materials:
4000 large tents
4000 medium and small tents
4375 plastic rolls
210,000 blankets
UNDP
-
3,500,000
600,000
1,225,500
700,000


Total Shelter materials

6,025,500
4,272,480
1,753,020
River boats with engines (spares)
UNDP
1,300,000
1,105,000
195,000
Resettlement packages
UNDP
15,500,000
0
15,500,000
Survey for resettlement areas
UNDP
345,000
0
345,000
Management and support costs (20%)
UNDP
4,604,100

3,551,404
Total

27,774,600
5,377,480
21,344,424
9. Agriculture

(i) Objective

This appeal relates to the agriculture and rural development sector of Mozambique, in addition to the fisheries sector. The present revision is the result of a much better understanding and realisation of the extent of the flood damage in these sectors. The objective of this appeal is to provide a comprehensive and urgent response to the complex emergency and rehabilitation needs of an estimated 122,600 rural families in southern and central provinces of Mozambique. This will enable these families to begin rebuilding their livelihoods. For livelihoods to be restored quickly, it is of critical importance that immediate support is provided to the second crop production season, which has just started (March/April through June), and also towards the main agricultural season starting in September 2000.

While this appeal is already substantially larger than the first appeal, it covers by no means the medium to longer term rehabilitation and reconstruction requirements of the agricultural and rural development sector. It is expected that in-depth assessments covered under this appeal will provide a much clearer picture of the magnitude of longer term reconstruction requirements.

It should be noted that in addition to the farming community, there are large population groups dependent on small-scale fishing, forest and natural resource exploitation, as well as marketing and trading activities for their livelihoods. It is the objective that under this appeal, initial measures are taken to address the most urgent needs towards restoring their livelihoods.

Thus, the overall objective is to restore food security and improve the nutritional status of rural and urban population groups through support to staple food production, livestock farming, rehabilitation of fisheries, support to forestry and natural resource sectors, and in support of agricultural marketing activities. Support to food security monitoring and assessment comprises an important complementary activity.

FAO issued two special alerts in capitals on 23 February and 3 March 2000 on the effects of the unprecedented floods on the crop production and the agricultural sector.

(ii) Justification

Excessive rainfall followed by unprecedented flooding in the Maputo, Gaza, Sofala, Inhambane and Manica provinces has caused tremendous loss to standing crop and livestock, in addition to important infrastructure (including homesteads, feeder roads and market infrastructure, irrigation schemes, farm equipment, and animal disease control facilities). Other rural livelihood systems have also been destroyed, including those of small-scale fishermen, rural households dependent on wood and other forest products for their main source of income, as well as those of small traders and marketers. The loss to the farmers in the affected areas is compounded by the fact that a significant number of farmers already had to re-plant their crops due to long dry-spells in the earlier part of the rainy season.

The agriculture, fisheries and forestry sectors are the most important economic sectors in Mozambique, as they provide livelihood security in varying degrees to more than 80 percent of the population. These sectors contribute 31 percent to national GDP (1997) and 61 percent to total export earnings.

Preliminary assessments of the flood affected areas:

  • Latest estimates, obtained from district and provincial level authorities, and compiled by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MADR) indicate that 126,600 rural households have been affected by the flooding. Of these, a very large proportion are farming families, which have been displaced and lost their fields, homesteads, agricultural equipment, livestock and other assets. An estimated 139,000 hectares planted to crops have been destroyed or seriously affected; the crops in order of importance are maize, beans, rice, sweet potatoes, groundnuts and vegetables; food and seed stocks have been destroyed.
  • In terms of livestock, it is estimated that 70-80% of the livestock population (approximately 350,000 cattle, goats and sheep mainly) have been seriously affected. There is also the threat of an increase in vector-borne diseases.
  • Important irrigation schemes have been destroyed, from a total irrigated area covering approximately 20,000 ha.
  • Markets and local food supply systems have been completely disrupted in at least 12 major market centres.
  • Agro-industry and agro-processing activities have been seriously affected or destroyed.
  • In the small-scale fishing community, nearly every means of earning a livelihood has been destroyed, as an estimated 50 percent of the boats, fishing nets and other fishing gear have been washed away and around 5,800 fisher-folk have been affected.

Households dependent on cash income from the sale of fuel-wood, charcoal and other wood and non-wood products have lost their implements.

(iii) Strategy

As flood waters are receding, greater access to the affected areas is now possible, and farming families are returning to their homesteads, or what is left of it. This appeal addresses the emergency needs of families returning to their villages, and will provide them with a means to re-build their homes and their main source of survival.

In addition to food needs, emergency support in the agricultural sector includes seed packs, basic tools, fishing gear, and veterinary assistance, as well as funds for operational and logistical support at district level. Furthermore, immediate, in-depth field assessments are required, for a better understanding of the most important short-term requirements for the rural livelihoods to be re-established. Finally, immediate support to restore essential services and critical equipment of importance to the agricultural sector is required.

The activities to be implemented are summarised as follows:

  • Support to the Emergency Group (EG) of MADR to co-ordinate emergency interventions to the agricultural sector and to provide technical assistance, including conducting an in-depth and multi-disciplinary assessment of the extent and nature of the damage caused to various farming and other rural livelihoods.
  • Immediate provision of a standard emergency package of seeds and tools to the worst affected farmers for crops to be planted for the current second cropping season (starting in March/April until June).
  • Immediate provision of vegetable seeds to improve the nutritional situation of the flood-affected households.
  • Immediate support to the production of good-quality seed and seed multiplication activities at farmers’ level.
  • Provision of seeds for the main 2000/01 cropping season starting in September 2000.
  • Immediate supplies of veterinary drugs and rehabilitation of diagnostic capacity.
  • Immediate support to the managed exploitation of forest products to help rural families rebuild their homesteads, and have adequate access to fuel-wood.
  • Urgent support to small-scale fishing communities to help restore their most important source of food intake.
  • Re-establishment of rural marketing infrastructure in support of reviving the rural economy as quickly as possible.

As emergency response activities are being undertaken, MADR and the Ministry of Fisheries is placing greater emphasis on the formulation of a post-emergency rehabilitation programme to be completed by the 2000/2001 agricultural season starting in September 2000.

In consultation with the Government of Mozambique, FAO plan to field jointly with WFP a crop and food supply assessment mission as soon as the conditions permit (tentatively around mid-March). The mission will evaluate damage to crop and losses due to the floods, assess the 2000 food crop production and estimate import requirements for 2000-2001, including food aid needs.

FAO is also recruiting an Emergency Co-ordinator to assist the Agricultural Emergency Coordinating Unit at the Ministry of Agriculture. Funded by OCHA initially for one month At a cost of 70,000 USD, this can be extended to cover a total of six months, bringing the amount to 140,000 USD.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government Responsible Institution: MADR

Partner UN Agency: FAO

Other Partners: national and international NGO’s, civil society and the private sector.

An Emergency Group (EG) for the co-ordination of the response and rehabilitation programmes has been set up for the agricultural sector in MADR with technical assistance support from FAO. Through the EG, an updated assessment of affected farming communities, agricultural production area lost, and of most urgent agricultural needs has been carried out. Additional information is being obtained from the Ministry of Fisheries, and from other development partners, including NGOs, donor agencies and the private sector.

Resource requirements for immediate assistance to food production and recovery of the agricultural, fisheries and forestry sectors have been estimated at US$13.19 million. Detailed profiles for specific interventions are being prepared. The assessment of the capacities and needs will be updated with the increased access and understanding of the impact of the crisis on the agricultural sector.

(v) Budget

Item
Implementing Institutions
Total Needs
US$
1st Appeal
(23 Feb. 2000)
Committed (17 Mar. 2000)
Emergency/Rehabilitation Seed Packs (2nd Season 1999/2000 and main season 2000/2001)
MADR
(plus partners)
4,100,000
1,450,000
1,100,000
Agricultural Tools
-
1,380,000
300,753
-
Veterinary Drugs and Supplies
-
445,000
350,000
-
Seed Multiplication
-
100,000
-
-
Forestry Sector Support
-
220,000
-
-
Fishing gear
-
1,820,000
-
-
Emergency Provision –Essential Services and Equipment to the Agricultural Sector
-
1,000,000
-
-
Sub-total
-
9,065,000
1,750,753
1,100,000
Transport, Distribution and Operational Support
-
3,100,000
350,151
-
In-depth Assessment of Damage to the Agricultural Sector
-
425,000
75,000
-
Technical Support, Monitoring and Evaluation
-
600,000
-
30,000
Total
-
13,190,000
2,525,904
1,130,000
10. Mine Action

(i) Objectives

The following objectives have been identified:

  • Mine Awareness for Internally Displaced Persons and relief agencies.
  • Information gathering of damaged infrastructure and flood effect on mined areas.
  • Survey Level 1 to confirm all minefields in flood effected areas.
  • Survey Level 2 and demining of resettlement areas for Internally Displaced Persons and repairs to damaged infrastructure.

(ii) Justification

Mine Action, currently has been prioritised in the collection of data and focusing the effort on mine awareness as it is possible to do so at the present moment. Mine Awareness has been prioritised at Internally Displaced Persons centres, which are in close proximity of landmines.

Physical demining in the majority of cases will commence once water levels have been reduced and affected areas are accessible. Presently, an assessment of the problem is underway to collect and collate information that is required to for possible reconstruction and development programs that will occur, and where displaced persons will be settled in the future. It is estimated that the problems posed by mines due to the floods will be long term as it affects a large area.

(iii) Strategy

Operations will be conducted in several concurrent phases. Mine awareness will be a continuing process of deploying self-sufficient teams to displaced people’s camps, which are faced with a mine problem. It is an immediate task that can be commenced to provide a degree of security.

Level 1 and level 2 survey will be conducted on basis of needs until flood affected areas stabilise and allow for survey teams to be deployed.

The emergency has created a need to increase the ability to conduct mine awareness, and the need for IND to co-ordinate mine awareness and level 1, 2 and 3 surveys.

The ability to respond will demand an increase in capacity and resources to deal with the problem in a shorter time period. This requirement is due to the probable migration of mines that will require attention before repairs of infrastructure i.e.; roads, bridges, railway lines and water sources or resettlement can commence.

Wide spread destruction of roads and bridges has meant a reliance on other forms of transport to continue operations in flood affected areas in accordance with IND objectives.

A Mine Action Co-ordination committee has been formed and chaired by IND. The committee represents all the mine clearance and mine awareness operators that conducts mine action in the provinces of Maputo, Gaza, Inhambane, Sofala and Manica. The committee is responsible for planning and tasking for mine action.

(iv) Responsibility for Implementation

Government Responsible Institution: The National Demining Institute (IND).

Responsible UN Agencies: UNDP and Unicef

(v) Budget

An amount of $100,000 has been received to cover operational costs and do an assessment of the impact of mines due to flooding. A further $300,000 has been pledged for mine action. This will assist in mobilising resources for a short-term period.

Medium and long term projected costs are for the next six months, which include the ability to conduct further Level 1, 2 and 3 Survey in support of local demining agencies to respond to mine action requirements.

Activity
UN Agency
US$
Mine Awareness
UNICEF
100.000
Imagery for mine maps
UNDP
40.000
Air support
UNDP
75.000
Operations support
UNDP
50.000
Survey and demining of effected areas
UNDP
2.600.000
Total

2.865.000
11. Coordination and Management

(i) Objectives

In order for INGC to fulfill its expected role it is essential that the Co-ordination Center continues to operate satisfactorily to 1) ensure the continuation of effective cooperation between government structures, UN organisations and other agencies involved in relief efforts, 2) evaluate the overall impact of the floods and monitor the implementation and the impact of the relief actions, 3) guarantee timely and complete reporting of donations received.

(ii) Justification

At the onset of the emergency, in agreement with the Government of Mozambique, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) deployed a UN Disaster Assessment and Co-ordination (UNDAC) team which was followed by the fielding of two other UNDAC teams to assist the Instituto Nacional de Gestao de Calamidades (INGC) and the UN Disaster Management Team. In view of facilitating INGC’s disaster response coordination role, the UNDAC teams facilitated the establishment and functioning of a Co-ordination Center. UNDP through its Emergency Response Division made immediately US$ 50.000 available to provide the Co-ordination Center with the required computer , office and communication equipment as well as interpretation services and clerical support.

(iii) Strategy

To achieve those objectives the functioning of the Co-ordination Center, after the last UNDAC team has left, will be ensured through the recruitment of technical support experts and support staff for the period of six months.

Adequate means of transport will be provided and some office supplies will also be procured.

This will allow INGC to assess the impact of the current floods, monitor the implementation and impact of the relief activities and the needs for further intervention, and on the basis of this experience, formalize the procedures, structures and methodologies for such activities in the future. In view of integrating the lessons learned into the future disaster management plan an evaluation will be carried out.

In addition the coordination capacity will be strengthened at sectorial level through UN-lead agencies, which will work with the concerned Government counterparts, in particular line ministries, in this respect. At the level of the INGC, an information management project will also be implemented in order to give the central Government the capacity to track contributions and emergency-related assistance activities.

In addition to the information capacity envisaged by UNDP to be based with the INGC, OCHA is appealing for an information officer who will be specifically assigned to assist the OCHA Disaster Management Expert under the overall guidance of the United Nations Resident Co-ordinator. The task of this officer will be to ensure that information is provided through existing OCHA dissemination channels to donors on the progress of assistance activities and the use of their respective contributions.

(iv) Responsible for Implementation

Government: INGC

UN Agency: UNDP and OCHA

(v) Budget

The estimated budget for the functioning of the Co-ordination Center and the evaluation is:


Implementing Agency
US$
Disaster management expert
UN/INGC Joint Logistic Coordination Unit
3 Support teams for Provincial Government
Information and reporting officer
Information assistant
Backstopping officer for database and LAN
Office manager
Logistics officer
Clerical staff
"lessons learned" consultancy
computers and printers(Beira and Xai Xai)
4 drivers
4x4 vehicle
Vehicle hire
office supplies, fuel, communications (Maputo, Beira, Xai Xai)
LAN equipment
OCHA
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
UNDP
100,000
75,000
55,000
24,000
15,000
10,000
15,000
10,000
4,500
20,000
20,000
10,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
2,000
Sub-Total

480,500
Support to sectoral Coordination

600,000
OCHA Disaster Management Expert

100,000
OCHA information officer and related Operational costs for six months

60,000
Information Management (Database) Including one Information Management Expert for one month to establish programme

250,000
International travel

100,000
Total:

1,590,500
Contributions received:

262,000
Net requirements:

1,328,500
UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.