Mozambique

Mozambique: Floods Appeal No. 10/01 (Preliminary) Operations Update No. 4

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published
Origin
View original


This Ops Update is intended for reporting on emergency appeals.
Period covered: 1 - 21 April (last Ops Update issued: no. 3 on 3 April, 2001)

Launched on 1 March, 2001 for CHF 4,895,506 for 3 months.

DREF Allocated: CHF 100,000

Beneficiaries: 46,000

"At a Glance"

Appeal coverage: 92.8%

Related Appeals: 01.22/2001 (Mozambique)

Outstanding needs: CHF 354,414

Update: Over the reporting period, the Federation and the Mozambican Red Cross (CVM) responded to the outbreak of cholera while also conducting a strategic planning process in preparation for the launch of the Appeal; regardless of these activities, further consolidated support has been provided in the centres. The logistical obstacles have decreased, with the Red Cross field offices having distributed a high proportion of non-food items to the centre populations while more CVM volunteers have been mobilized to provide traditional Red Cross support in a higher number of non-managed centres, including some distributions of non-food relief items to several centres where these needs have not been met by other humanitarian organizations. A total of 53,368 beneficiaries are sheltered in Federation and CVM managed and jointly managed centres, with over 300 CVM volunteers now having activities in 47 other centres which accommodate over 80,000 people, bringing the total number of beneficiaries to receive some type of Red Cross assistance to over 133,000, accounting for 60% of all internally displaced people sheltered in the flood affected provinces.

The context

Mozambique is once again afflicted with severe flooding, marking the second consecutive year in which people’s lives hinge on the brink of survival. This year heavy rains in Zimbabwe, Zambia, Malawi and northern Mozambique resulted in the Zambeze River Basin being in flood since mid-February. Four provinces, which straddle the Zambeze River in Mozambique, have been affected, as follows: Sofala, Manica, Tete and Zambezia, amounting to 200,000 square kilometres, to include countless homes and properties being destroyed and over 400,000 people being directly affected.

Responding to the humanitarian needs, the Federation launched Preliminary Emergency Appeal 10/01 on 1 March, 2001 seeking CHF 4,895,506 to provide support to the CVM in assisting 30,000 beneficiaries for 3 months. CHF 100,000 was allocated from the Federation’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) to immediately start the delivery of relief assistance.

Latest events

A Government-led mission to assess the flood affected areas, which included UN agencies, completed its work on 6 April. According to the mission, the number of flood affected people in the temporary accommodation centres in the four provinces is now estimated to be 225,075, while the floods have affected another 236,754 people in other locations, resulting in a total affected population of 461,811. The assessment also identified 65 centres accommodating displaced people, with the number being reduced from the previously reported 79, as the mission found that some isolated communities, receiving external assistance had not actually been relocated, but were rather cut-off by the floods. The United Nations also stated that 200,000 square kilometres of land has been affected by this year’s floods in the Zambezi, Licungo and Pungoe Basins, which is 70,000 more square kilometres than the floods further south last year. Furthermore, the United Nations FAO reported that the crop area lost in the 2001 floods is estimated to be 71,900 hectares.

Finally towards the end of April, over two months after the disaster first occurred, the number of people taking refuge in centres is no longer increasing, with many centres now being closed to new arrivals. However, further people are displaced outside of the centres, living in isolated communities, receiving little external support, with these people becoming more vulnerable, contracting waterborne diseases.

The water level along the Zambeze River in Mozambique has improved over the first three weeks of this month, but the level generally remains more than one metre above the flood limit in many areas, with the water level also fluctuating on a daily basis. Due to Cahora Bassa reservoir level peaking again on 10 April at 328.18 metres, the dam opened three gates during the second week of the month. Currently the dam level is depreciating between five to ten cm per day. The Tete water levels were consistently high between 26 February and 25 March, with the maximum registered on 22 March, at 7.40 metres, with the level going down to 5.80 metres during the second week of April. At the Caia hydrometric station, the maximum level registered was 8.14 metres on 10 March, however by 15 April, the level was down to 6.14 metres. The Pungue River, between 12 February to 18 April was above seven metres, at one stage peaking at 8.79, but as of 23 April, is at 6.80 metres. While many roads are still submerged under water, others have began to drain, enabling them to be repaired and have subsequently reopened. This has eased the logistical constraints in some areas experienced by all partners involved in the humanitarian operation.

As the flood levels recede, the true extent of flood damage is becoming more apparent. Many people know that they have not only lost their dwelling, but also their land, crops and livestock. Even those who have a house to return to question how they will feed their families as their crops and food supplies have been wiped-out by the floods.

Over the second week of April, an increased number of patients were treated by the Mozambican Red Cross (CVM) First Aid volunteers, having contracted diseases in and around the centres in all four provinces. Waterborne diseases have particularly risen. Consequently, water and sanitation practices have become even more crucial, but due to the water level dropping, it now takes far longer for the humanitarian organizations to pump water from rivers, prior to chlorination for the centre populations. Increases in diseases were particularly noted in malaria, diarrhoea, skin infections, fevers and bilharzia with the situation regarding cholera being carefully monitored by the Government, and other organization’s working in the health sector, not just in the centres but in the whole of the flood affected areas.

Unfortunately, over the week starting 16 April, cholera was officially confirmed to have been contracted by several patients in Mutarara. Indeed, the Ministry of Health officially announced the outbreak in Nhamayabue, the district capital of Mutarara in Tete Province, with cholera cases being confirmed in laboratory tests in Tete city. The Ministry called on all partner organizations to increase their efforts regarding sanitation, hygiene and water chlorine levels. A WHO specialist also carried out an assessment during the course of the same week, confirming the findings.

As of 17 April there have been no deaths in the Vile-Mutarara area, but 94 patients were suffering with the symptoms of cholera that day, with the number of new patients increasing, most of whom were living outside of the centres (five suspected cases in total from Baue and Sukamiala Centres), with assessments concluding that the direct cause was from drinking untreated water/eating fish from the Zambezi River.

Three suspected cases have been found in Inhangoma town, again in Mutarara District, which is of great concern as diarrhoea cases are high and there is no provision for a cholera treatment centre, with chlorine in short supply and a lack of latrines. In Traquino Vila, 2.5 kms from Inhangoma (another district of Mutarara) there are seven suspected cases of cholera, with two children having died. Other flood affected areas are being closely monitored. In Sena, Caia district of Sofala Province, samples were sent to a laboratory in Beira for testing. While the number of diarrhoea and dysentery cases in Chupanga has risen considerably, no cholera was suspected.

Red Cross/Red Crescent action

Response to cholera outbreak

The Ministry of Health co-ordinated a quick response to the outbreak of cholera in Mutarara, with the Ministry, and MSF, supported by UNICEF, setting-up cholera treatment centres in Mutarara and the surrounding area. The Norwegian Red Cross had donated four full cholera kits in response to the Federation’s Preliminary Appeal. Each kit is designed to treat 1,000 patients, as such a total of 4,000 cholera cases can be treated by these kits. One full cholera kit on standby in Mutarara was handed-over to the cholera treatment centres by the Federation. The Swedish Red Cross’ Mass Water and Mass Sanitation Emergency Response Unit (ERU) has also provided sanitation equipment, one 5m³ bladder tank, a storage tent, vector control equipment, lime and chlorine, body bags and beds for the cholera treatment centres. It will also provide treated water for two of the cholera treatment centres: Charre and Vile Nova. The ERU, which is based in Charre Centre, has also increased its water capacity, intensifying chlorine levels, aiming to produce 230 m³ per day from the current 116 m³, with the Federation’s truck currently supporting MSF’s water transportation capacity within the area.

In Caia, the Federation and Mozambican Red Cross (CVM) staff are part of a three-member Caia cholera committee, responsible for monitoring the situation, with the other two members being World Vision and UNICEF. On 20 April the Federation and CVM team visited the health centre in Sena, where the situation regarding cholera was under control with no confirmed cases of cholera, but five patients were under observation, of which two were discharged the following day. Two full Norwegian Red Cross donated cholera kits are on standby in Caia, to be handed-over to the Ministry of Health if the situation deteriorates, with the CVM Health Technician and eight CVM cholera volunteers already mobilized to support the Ministry, with a CVM Water and Sanitation Technician due to arrive in Caia on 24 April. Furthermore the Chupanga Red Cross Field Office team have been monitoring the situation regarding cholera, with one full Norwegian funded cholera kit also on standby.

The CVM has over 300 trained volunteers active in the four flood affected provinces, working in a variety of different sectors, to include health/sanitation awareness. The CVM volunteers have intensified their preventative health, sanitation and hygiene dissemination sessions, with cholera prevention messages being reiterated by tent-to-tent and community visits, carried out from dawn to dusk, while the volunteers ensure strict sanitation procedures are adopted by beneficiaries in all managed centres. They are also involved in sanitation practises in the centres, disinfecting latrines and garbage pits with chlorine. Additionally, in Zambezia province, CVM volunteers are not only active in the centres, but also within the local communities, disseminating the same messages. Similarly, the CVM First Aid volunteers are busy in all four provinces identifying any possible new cases of cholera, transferring them to the health clinics or cholera treatments centres. Plans to expand the overall numbers of CVM volunteers involved in cholera prevention and dissemination, water, sanitation and First Aid are also underway.

Strategic Planning and Appeal Process

Over the reporting period the Federation and CVM’s field staff and volunteers have been conducting needs assessments in the temporary accommodation centres and the surrounding areas to facilitate the organization with its strategic planning and appeal process. Firstly, the current and longer-term non-food needs are being reassessed, to ensure that the Federation will be appealing for priority outstanding needs for beneficiaries within the centres and in preparation for their repatriation home (or to higher grounds), once they leave the centres. Secondly, the longer-term needs of the beneficiaries are being assessed, with discussions occurring within the four flood affected CVM provincial offices, to ascertain the type of longer-term assistance to be given to the affected communities.

Meetings are also taking place with government and non-governmental bodies, to ensure that all highlighted needs are met and that no duplication of needs occurs. Beneficiaries have highlighted to the Red Cross that one of their most pressing needs is to have seeds and tools on their departure from the centres. Fortunately seeds and tools are largely being covered by the UNFAO and NGOs, consequently the Red Cross will not provide this type of assistance. The Red Cross’ repatriation component of the Appeal will also be designed to ensure that assistance provided by the CVM, with the Federation’s support, will not overburden the National Society, which has been heavily involved in two consecutive flood operations and is still involved in an ambitious rehabilitation programme as a result of the 2000 flood operation. Consequently, the appeal, shortly to be released to donors, will be focussed on priority needs and will complement the ongoing and overall 2001 strategic planning process.

Overview of Federation and CVM’s activities in centres

Over the reporting period, the Red Cross Field Offices have being responding to controlling the cholera outbreak and conducting the strategic planning process; regardless of these activities the overall flood operation has been progressing well, with further consolidated support provided in the temporary accommodation centres. The logistical obstacles have depreciated, with the Red Cross Field Offices having distributed a high proportion of non-food items to the centre populations, while more CVM volunteers have been mobilized to provide traditional Red Cross support in a higher number of non-managed centres, to include some distributions of non-food relief items to several centres where these needs have not being met by other humanitarian organizations.

As of 21 April, 53,368 beneficiaries are sheltered in Federation and CVM managed and jointly managed temporary Accommodation Centres, with over 300 CVM volunteers now having activities in 47 other centres, which accommodate in excess of 80,000 people, bringing the total number of beneficiaries to receive some type of Red Cross assistance to over 133,000, accounting for 60% of all internally displaced people sheltered in the flood affected provinces.

Federation and CVM action in managed or jointly managed centres

The Federation and CVM currently provides two different types of support to the centres. Within the first category are those centres it manages or co-manages (many of the centres have an overall Management Committee, consisting of a member of the local government administration and the major humanitarian organizations operating in the centre, consequently they are jointly managed centres). Operations are progressing well in the seven managed and jointly managed centres, with the Red Cross’ commitment including the provision of shelter (tents and tarpaulins), a full range of non-food relief items (kitchen sets, blankets, mosquito nets, jerry cans, buckets, etc.) and for being responsible for general camp management; water and sanitation facilitates; First Aid/health services; to include preventative health/hygiene awareness, in conjunction with other humanitarian organizations and the government.

The Federation set a limit to the maximum number of beneficiaries to be assisted by each of the four Red Cross Field Offices, with the overall ceiling set at 46,324. Since the beginning of the crisis the number of beneficiaries has continually fluctuated in the centres, with new beneficiaries arriving throughout the reporting period. In order to clarify the exact number of beneficiaries accommodated in Red Cross managed and jointly managed centres, several of the Field Offices have conducted recount verification processes over the reporting period. The Mopeia, Caia and Mutarara (for Mandua Centre only) Red Cross Field Offices have completed this process, resulting in a higher number of beneficiaries noted, with the Chupanga Red Cross Office currently conducting a recount. However, in Chupanga, it is anticipated that exact beneficiaries will be lower than currently estimated. The Federation and CVM plan to provide non-food items to all beneficiaries accommodated in the centres, even though the numbers of beneficiaries are over 7,000 higher than originally planned.

CVM and Federation jointly managed centres, with current beneficiary numbers (status as of 21 March):

Province
District
Red Cross Field Office
Red Cross Co/Managed Centres
Current Centre Pop.
Planned Max pop. for support in RC centres
Discrepancies
Sofala Caia Caia Amilcar Cabral
12,584
Caia: 20,038
1,200 under max
Zangue
6,254
Chupanga Chupanga
20,744
Chupanga: 15,000
5,744 over max
Tete Mutarara Mutarara Charre
4,744
Mutarara: 5,000
256 under max
Zambezia Mopeia Mopeia 24 de Julho
4,345
Mopeia: 6,286
2,756 over max
Intata
3,900
Bajone
797
TOTAL
53,368
46,324
7,044 over max

Federation and CVM action in non-managed centres

The second type of support is provided to a higher number of centres, where the Red Cross has no managerial responsibility, but is able to offer Red Cross assistance in all four flood affected provinces. This input fluctuating in accordance with the following: the outstanding needs in the centre; how active other humanitarian organizations are in the centre (some humanitarian organizations are reducing their activities now); how many CVM volunteers are mobilized within the area, which also depends on whether access, by road or boat, is possible to the centre from the nearest Red Cross Field Office.

Every week the CVM increases its network of volunteers working in the centres, by identifying, training and mobilizing new volunteer activists, enabling the National Society to support further non-Red Cross managed centres. In a proportion of these non-managed centres, the CVM volunteers provide the majority of Red Cross traditional activities (first aid/health, preventative health programmes, mine awareness, tracing, social and psycho-social support, and the identification/training of new CVM volunteers), whereas in other centres the CVM is focusing exclusively on First Aid, disseminating essential preventative health/hygiene messages to the centre’s population and the chlorination of water. As of 21 April, over 300 CVM Volunteers work in 47 centres in addition to the seven managed centres. Within these 47 centres, several receive distributions of Red Cross donated non-food items.

Indeed, on 10 April, ECHO confirmed a donation of Euro 700,000 in response to the Mozambique Preliminary Flood Appeal, which will enable the Federation to purchase further non-food items and water/sanitation equipment. Consequently the Federation and CVM was able to confirm that it is in a position to support two non-managed centres, with Red Cross non-food items; namely Nensa Centre, in Sofala Province and Mandua Centre in Tete Province. It should also be noted that several other centres and communities in Zambezia are provided with non-food relief items, but these additional needs are not supported by the Federation’s current Preliminary Appeal, with the appeal focussing on Zambezia’s 24 de Julho, Intata and Bajone Centres.

47 Centres where CVM provide the minimum of First Aid, Preventative Health/Hygiene and Water Chlorination Activities:

Province
District
Centre Name
Province
District
Centre Name
Sofala Caia Nhambalo/ Gangala Tete Mutarara Baue
Sombreiro Nkoletche
Magagade Manica Chicote
Tchetcha Inhangoma
CFM Zambezia Mopeia Zonas Verdes
25 de Setembro Marruma
Marromeu Nensa (incl. relief) Nhacatundo
Nhamatanda Muda-Mufo Nauere
Machongo Valeta
Dondo Mutua Zanza
Buzi Companhia Buzi Namirere
Buzi Sede Calendane
Martinote Sede
Lusalite Mongane
Cheringoma Santoue Catel
Matondo Quelimane Sampene
Nangue Nicodala Mucelo
Chemba Vila Sede Majanja Morla
Chimbue Tambala Nhacolo sede
Nhango Manica Sabeta
Macanga Nhacafula
Senhabuzua Sussundenga Madibunhane
Tete Mutarara Mandua (incl.relief) Mabanha
Mutarara Sede (First Aid only) 4 Provinces 15 Districts 47 CENTRES

Beira Logistical Support Centre

Despite sporadic rainfall since the beginning of April, many of the roads to access the Federation and CVM operational areas have reopened to four-by-four vehicles. Beira, the Federation and CVM’s operational logistics centre, can now be accessed by road from Maputo, South Africa and Zimbabwe. The road between Beira and Caia and the road between Caia and Chupanaga is also open. On 12 April the road between Caia and Mutarara reopened for the first time since the crisis occurred, however it is still very difficult to navigate this route, being only accessible to the minimum of four-by-four trucks, with the condition deteriorating again over the weekend of 21 April, subsequently the Federation and CVM has not dispatched any convoys along this route, preferring to use the longer, but safer road from Beira through Tete and Malawi to Mutarara, which is functioning well. Similarly, when dispatching items from Beira to Mopeia or Quelimane, in Zambezia Province, trucks use the route from Beira, via Malawi, which take around four to five days.

According to the UN, the fixed-wing Buffalo aircraft will continue to operate between Beira and Caia until 27 April now, with the three helicopters continuing their service, which includes the Caia - Mutarara rotation, until 24 April. The Buffalo facility prioritizes food items, indeed WFP need to transfer 4,000 metric tons of food to 65 different centers in order to provide a one-month food ration for beneficiaries departing from the centres. As such, only urgent Red Cross non-food items can be shipped by air. However, both the fixed-wing and helicopters have been available for the transfer of Red Cross personnel, which is most important, as transfers include medical evacuations out of field areas, which have been frequent over the crisis period, from the Caia, Mutarara and Chupanga Red Cross Field Offices.

All outgoing items from Beira are dispatched to Caia, with Caia either distributing in the Caia based centres, or shipping the items onwards to Chupanga by road, or Mutarara by helicopter. Items for Mutarara are also dispatched by truck directly from Beira, via Malawi, bypassing Caia. Items for Zambezia Province (Mopeia or Quelimane), are shipped by truck directly from Beira, again through Malawi.

Deliveries into and out of Beira, between 31 March and 21 April, 2001

In/Out
item
quantity/unit
donor
transport
from or to
In Cottage tents 500 pieces Swedish RC road RSA
In Used clothes 1,680 kgs Spanish RC road Maputo
In Chlorination tablets 1,056,000 pieces British RC air RSA
In Clean-up Kits 400 boxes American RC road Maputo
In Blankets 1,000 pieces Federation Appeal road Harare
In clothes/bedding/shoes 10,885 kgs Private donor road Maputo
In Chlorination tablets 280,000 pieces Disaster Preparedness road Maputo
In Boat engine 3 pieces, 70 HP Federation Appeal road Maputo
In Boat engine 3 pieces, 40 HP Federation Appeal road Maputo
In Plastic Sheeting 100 rolls Federation Appeal road Maputo
In Soap 1,292 kg Disaster Preparedness road Maputo
In Jerry Cans 1,980 pieces Disaster Preparedness road Maputo
In Plastic Buckets 1,700 pieces Disaster Preparedness road Maputo
In Mosquito Nets 200 pieces Disaster Preparedness road Maputo
In Kitchen Sets 500 sets Disaster Preparedness road Maputo
In Volunteer Kits 50 kits Federation road Harare
Out Kitchen Sets 1,649 sets British RC air & road Caia
Out Kitchen Sets 1,307 sets Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out Tarpaulin 1,535 pieces British RC air & road Caia
Out Tarpaulin 1,260 pieces Spanish RC air Caia
Out Blankets 5,720 pieces Norwegian RC road Caia
Out Tents 305 pieces Swedish RC road Caia
Out Family Kits 233 kits British RC road Caia
Out Family Kits 496 kits British RC road Mopeia
Out Family Kits 650 kits Swiss RC road Mopeia
Out Clean-up Kits 50 kits American RC road Caia
Out Clean-up Kits 100 kits American RC (old stock) road Mopeia
Out Plastic sheeting 37 rolls Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out Plastic Buckets 1,500 pieces Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out Jerry Cans 1,472 pieces Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out BP-5 10 boxes Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out Used Clothes/bedding 7,080 kg Private donor road Caia
Out Used Shoes 890 pairs Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out 75 HP boat engine 1 piece Disaster Preparedness road Caia
Out Diesel 1,400 litres Federation stock air & road Caia

Caia (Sofala Province)

The Caia Field Office has a total of two Federation delegates, a team leader/camp manager and a logistics delegate, with the latter co-ordinating all incoming items from Beira with his CVM counterpart, and their onward transportation to Mutarara and Chupanga. The CVM has a Coordinator from Maputo and a Health Technician in the Field Office, as well as 83 CVM volunteer activists who work in the centres every day. Additionally, on the week starting 23 April, a CVM Water and Sanitation Technician will join the team.

The Caia Red Cross Field Office is responsible for managing the Amilcar Cabral and Zangue Temporary Accommodation Centres. On 18 April the CVM completed an assessment survey, which involved a beneficiary verification process in the two managed centres. The findings as the assessment concluded that Amilcar Cabral Centre currently hosts 1,878 families (12,584 people) and Zangue Centre hosts 1,240 families (6,254 people), which is an increase, with more members noted in each family than initially estimated.

The CVM volunteers are active in the following areas in Amilcar Cabral and Zangue: general camp management; registration; relief distributions; First Aid/Health; water and sanitation (to include latrines and garbage disposal) and preventative health/hygiene sessions. A further 20 CVM volunteers were newly recruited over the past two weeks (ten of which were involved in the assessment), receiving basic Red Cross Movement training. Relief distributions have also continue, to include used and new clothes, blankets, kitchen sets and family kits (see relief chart) in both centres. The Federation and CVM have constructed 322 latrines in the two centres, 134 in Amilcar Cabral and 188 in Zangue, with this work continuing as the latrines become full. CVM volunteers also continued with their water chlorination programme in the centres, with ACF responsible for supplying the water. However, outside of the centres, clean water has become more problematic as only stagnant water remains, with no agency providing clean water for the local community, resulting in children frequently suffering from fevers, skin diseases and diarrhoea.

Additionally, the CVM volunteers are active in surrounding centres, providing First Aid, preventative health/hygiene messages and water chlorination to seven other centres. While nine CVM volunteers work in each of the two Red Cross managed centres, a total of 83 CVM volunteers operate out of the Red Cross Caia office. During the week starting 15 April, CVM First Aid volunteers conducted preventative health/hygiene sessions to a total of 1,560 beneficiaries in all the centres the Red Cross has an input into, to include Amilcar Cabral and Zangue.

The recent Red Cross Beneficiary Assessment involved ten newly recruited and trained volunteers. The most vulnerable groups of people identified were those people living on railway lines from Ghangala Nhambalo, Murasa, Magagade, Tchetcha and Sena areas, where they receive no external support, living without shelter items, drinking stagnant water, with particular concerns regarding the outbreak of disease. CVM volunteers visit these dislocated communities, providing First Aid support, with some beneficiaries in urgent need of medical assistance, being transferred to the clinic by the CVM. Again, in Sofala Province, Cheringoma District, the CVM recently discovered over 3,000 displaced people taking shelter in Santoue, Matondo, Nangue, who had received no external assistance. They will now be supported from the Caia Red Cross Field Office, with three new First Aid Centres being established by the CVM.

Mutarara (Tete Province)

The Red Cross Mutarara field office has one Federation team leader/camp manager, who works hand-in-hand with his CVM counterpart, a total of 128 CVM volunteers and the Swedish Red Cross mass water and mass sanitation Emergency Response Unit (ERU) members. The Red Cross Mutarara field office has to deal with all incoming items from Beira (via Malawi) and Caia, and is responsible for the management and distribution of non-food items in Charre Temporary Accommodation Centre, which currently has a population of 4,744 displaced persons and for non-food relief distributions in Mandua Centre, which hosts 990 families. The CVM volunteers are also active in a further five centres. The ERU Unit is responsible for providing clean water for five centres in the area. As noted earlier in the report, over the week starting 16 April, the Red Cross Mutarara field team was also responding to the threat of a cholera outbreak, supporting the Ministry of Health and MSF working in the area.

Twelve CVM volunteers currently operate in Charre Centre, dealing with all camp management work, to include relief distributions, first aid, preventative health/hygiene messages, water purification, sanitation and the daily supervision of the latrines. A further 116 CVM volunteers work in first aid/health posts, disseminating preventative health/hygiene messages and chlorinating water in six other centres, as follows: Mandua; Mutarara - Sede; Baue; Nkoletche; Chicote and Inhangoma (in Mutarara Sede the CVM volunteers only work in First Aid, but 22 CVM volunteers are active in two First Aid/Health posts in Nkoletche Centre). The CVM volunteers working in First Aid have been particularly busy over the past week, with an average of 50 new malaria cases per day reported in each Charre and Mandua centres alone. Additionally the CVM volunteers have been very active disseminating messages, from tent to tent. regarding malaria and cholera prevention in all the centres over the course of the week and disinfecting latrines and garbage pits with chlorine.

The Red Cross managed Charre Temporary Accommodation Centre is fairly well established now, with most of the non-food needs met. MSF originally built 10 latrines, with the Federation and CVM having built 110 latrines, resulting in a total of 120.

Based on the Federation’s recent decision to provide non-food items to beneficiaries in the neighbouring Mandua Temporary Accommodation Centre, over the reporting period the Federation and 12 CVM volunteers have been particularly active in this centre. In order to provide accurate beneficiary distribution lists, on 5 April CVM volunteers conducted a hut-to-hut recount, to ascertain the number of families taking refuge in Mandua, with the results indicated 990 families, with the findings being compared with the local administration figures. The distribution of Red Cross items commenced for family tents, tarpaulins, blankets and jerry cans, but due to the beneficiaries receiving little or no non-food items to date, the first distributions had to be postponed, as there was a lack of beneficiary discipline. However, the following day distributions were conducted in an orderly manner, with the Red Cross planning to distribute further items over the course of the next few weeks. In addition to the distributions, CVM volunteers have been active clearing sites for latrines and have completed building fifteen latrines to-date. Latrine slabs for further latrines have been provided by the ERU Team and World Vision. Furthermore, 250 Red Cross family tents have also been erected in Mandua by the CVM volunteers and the ground has been prepared for the transfer of a bladder tank to the centre.

The Swedish Red Cross Mass Water and Mass Sanitation Emergency Response Unit (ERU)

The ERU, which has been fully operational since the weekend of 24/25 March, is progressing extremely well, producing 116m³ of processed water per day for the following centres/field hospitals located between Charre and the Malawian border: Charre Centre and Charre field hospital; Baue Centre; Mandua Centre; Nkoleche 1/11 Centres; Chicote Centre and Vile Nova field hospital. It will also provide treated water for two of the recently established Cholera Treatment Centres: Vile Nova and Charre. Indeed, the ERU is aiming at producing 230m³ per day, due to the cholera outbreak. However, before this can be achieved, further water tanks will have to be installed and the overall water transportation capacity will need to be enhanced.

The ERU is situated in the Charre Red Cross managed centre, with MSF being responsible for transporting the processed water to all the other centres. The Federation’s truck was shared with MSF for a week to ensure that all centres received processed water. MSF have now receive two further trucks, to enhance the water transportation capacity, with an additional Federation truck also en route to Mutarara. As planned, now the ERU is fully installed and well established, three of the five ERU team members have departed Mutarara. A fourth was evacuated due to ill-health, with a replacement being sought by the Swedish Red Cross. The fifth delegate, the Team Leader was replaced by a new Team Leader on Sunday 22 April, with the new Team Leader and a replacement delegate remaining in post.

Chupanga (Sofala Province)

The Chupanga Red Cross field office consists of two Spanish/Federation delegates, their CVM counterpart, with the second delegate having arrived on 4 April, to take the place of the previously medical evacuated delegate. Furthermore, a total of 40 new CVM volunteers have been trained by experienced CVM volunteers, who originated from the Beira CVM Office, bringing the total number of CVM volunteers operating out of the Chupanga Red Cross field office to 44. This Red Cross Field Team has been very effective in setting-up the jointly-managed Chupanga centre, with a reliable pipeline being established for this region, with the road now fully operational from Beira, via Caia to Chupanga.

Newly displaced persons continued to arrive in the jointly-managed Chupanga Sede Temporary Accommodation Centre on a daily basis until 7 April, when the total population was estimated to be at 20,744 (ie 5,744 in excess of the total assistance to be provided under the appeal for this region) or 4,424 families. From 7 April the centre was officially closed by the government/INGC to new beneficiaries. In order to ascertain the exact number of current beneficiaries, all CVM volunteers will be mobilized to conduct another night time recount of beneficiaries. The results of this recount will assist all agencies working in Chupanga centre with their planned distributions, to include the accurate figure of beneficiaries to receive WFP food rations in the centre.

Twenty three CVM volunteers are active in Chupanga centre on a daily basis, being supervised by the CVM and Federation team leaders. Their daily work includes the following: general camp management duties; registering new arrivals; conducting recounts of beneficiaries; distributing relief items; First Aid, identification of serious cases and subsequent evacuated of patients to the Health Centre; disseminating basic health/hygiene/sanitation messages; building latrines and chlorinating water. To date, 77 latrines have been built by the CVM volunteers and the local community, with 33 latrines being rehabilitated over the week 14 April.

In Chupanga and in Nensa Centre six CVM volunteers in each centre supported the Ministry of Health to administer vaccinations and vitamin supplements. Additionally, dissemination sessions were conducted by the CVM volunteers.

In the neighbouring Nensa Temporary Accommodation Centre, which currently holds 5,623 people, the majority of occupants have received no non-food items at all, living in makeshift huts. While this centre is not managed by the Red Cross, a total of 2,930 Red Cross donated tarpaulins, 349 family tents, and 23 latrine buckets have been distributed by 14 April, with plans underway, pending donations, to distribute further items in the coming weeks. A total of 21 CVM volunteers work in this camp on a daily basis, particularly in the area of First Aid, disseminating basic health/hygiene sessions and the chlorination of water. Their First Aid work includes the identification and subsequent evacuation of patients to the Chupanga field hospital. In April dissemination sessions have been increased, being particularly focused on the correct usage of latrines, as the beneficiaries in this centre are not familiar with such practises. Additionally, CVM dissemination sessions have focused on cholera prevention, with meetings also held with chiefs and religious leaders, to enable them to disseminate their newly learnt knowledge to their own community in the centre.

Federation and CVM statistics for Chupanga and Nensa Temporary Accommodation Centres

Statistics
Chupanga: Sessions/bens.
Nensa: Sessions/bens
Dissemination Sessions (March) 615 Water/Sanitation, 615 bens. 50/Health Awareness, 1,274 bens.
Water Chlorination (March) 120 litres water/ 114,102 bens. 420 litres water/210,000 bens.
Meningitis (8-14 April) 4,191 beneficiaries 4,100 beneficiaries
Tetanus (8-14 April) 92 bens (pregnant women) 70 bens (pregnant women)
Measles (8-14 April) 1,140 beneficiaries 830 beneficiaries
Vitamin A supplement (8-14 Apr) 2,069 beneficiaries (children) 2,500 beneficiaries (children)

Mopeia (Zambezia Province)

The CVM in Zambezia Province has been very active in their response to the floods, with a total of 53 CVM volunteers involved in the overall operation. No Federation delegates are located in the province, as the CVM operation in Zambezia is well organized, additionally there is a lack of Federation Relief Delegates available for the Mozambique flood operation as a whole. While a Health and Social Welfare Technician were already based in Zambezia Province, two additional Health and two Water and Sanitation Technicians and a further logistician have been recruited by CVM for the floods operation.

Parts of the Zambezia province have been affected by floods in 2001 since 23 January, (Quelimane, Maganje de Costa, Pebane, Mamacurra, Nicoadala, Mocuba and Milange) and again later along the Zambeze River, which affected Mopeia districts (including Posto Campo), Chinde and Morrumbala.

In response to the initial floods, the CVM in Zambezia focussed its support on Quelimane, Maganje de Costa and Nicoadala districts, assisting people taking refuge in three centres, Sampede, Mucelo, and Morlan, with a total population of 354 families or some 1,800 people and within the local community itself. All Red Cross activities (as listed below) are carried out in the three centres, to include the distribution of non-food items in all but Morla Centre, with the operation continuing, except in the recently closed Mucelo Centre, as people have now been able to return to their homes. Health activities, water treatment and sanitation assistance is also provided for the local community living outside of the centres.

In response to the Zambeze River floods, the CVM has focussed its work on three districts in Mopeia, which flank the river, supporting the following centres - In Mopeia Sede locality: Intata; 24 de Julho, Zonas Verdes and Marruma. In Chimuara locality: Zanza, Namirere, Nauere, Valeta, Calendane and Nhacatundo. In Posto Campo locality: Sede, Bajone, Mongane and Catel with all these 14 centres in Mopeia district accommodating a total of 36,047. The CVM also support the local communities in the flood affected areas, with the CVM volunteers work including: First Aid and health, to include preventative and curative medicine; water purification; latrine construction; social activities for children and mine-awareness, Tracing, Message and Family Reunification and non-food relief distributions. Strong emphasis is placed on disseminating messages regarding health, sanitation and hygiene, with the target population adopting good practices, thereby reducing the likelihood of a cholera outbreak.

Of the above mentioned centres, the CVM manages three temporary accommodation centres, supported by the Federation Appeal: Intata, 24 de Julho and Bajone, of which the first two are located in Mopeia and the latter in Posto Campo locality. In all three centres, the CVM conducted beneficiary recounts on 15 April, concluding that there are: 780 families (3,900 people) in Intata; 869 families (4,345 people) in 24 de Julho and 160 families (797 people) in Bajone.

In these centres CVM provide the following: beneficiary registration and verification; non-food relief distributions; First Aid and health; preventative health/sanitation dissemination sessions; sanitation, to include the construction of latrines, wells and disposal systems; water treatment; mine-awareness, social activities for children and tracing, message and family reunification. A total of 48 CVM volunteers operate in Intata and 24 de Julho, with a total of 13 in Posto Campo. Within the overall volunteer numbers, 12 new volunteers have been identified and trained, between 7-13 April for each Intata and 24 de Julho and three for Bajone. The volunteers in each centre split into groups, in accordance to their training.

In all three centres the CVM is responsible for the Health Centre and First Aid Post, with the CVM volunteers working under the supervision of the CVM’s Health Technical and Ministry of Health’s doctor and nurse in Intata and 24 de Julho, with one government nurse (no doctor) also in Bajone. On average 20 patients per day by the CVM are treated in Bajone. Between 1 and 15 April, in Intata Centre a total of 448 patients were treated, five of which were evacuated and in 24 de Julho, 323 patients were treated, suffering from malaria, bilharzia, diarrhoea and conjunctivitis, of which 17 were evacuated.

The following number of latrines have been built by the CVM: Intata (20); 24 de Julho (30), and Bajone (13). In Intata centre six traditional wells were also constructed by the CVM, with the CVM volunteers responsible for disinfecting the wells on a daily basis and for water purification in the three centres. Over the first two weeks of April, in 24 de Julho Centre, three sessions were conducted on mine-awareness for 470 beneficiaries and in Intata Centre five mine-awareness lectures were conducted to 583 beneficiaries. Over the same period, in the whole of the Mepeia Sede area (to include the local community), 268,806 litres of water were purified for over 100,000 people, with over 2,000 lectures in sanitary awareness disseminated to nearly 60,000 people.

Federation and CVM total distributed items by four Field Offices (as of 14 April, 2001 )

Item
Distributed by 4 Red Cross Field Offices
Caia (Sofala)
Chupanga (Sofala)
Mutarara (Tete)
Mopeia (Zambezia)
Total Distributions
Tents
1,079*
1,387
746
95
2,228
Tarpaulins
1,131
3,325
701
470
5,627
Rolls Plastic Sheets
8*
5
29
80
114
Blankets
6,790
9,140
1,501
275
17,706
Soap (kgs)
4,168
0*
1,644
153
5,965
Mosquito Nets
5,254
3,350
660
9,264
Kitchen Sets
2,335
1,409
488
100
4,332
Jerry Cans
3,868
3,190
669
135
7,862
Buckets
1,400
75
800
200
2,475
* adjusted figures

The above chart takes into account family kits distributed, with the content of each kit listed per item. To date, 1,500 family kits have been donated by the British Red Cross and a further 650 family kits donated by the Swiss Red Cross.

Outstanding needs

The Federation and CVM have no immediate needs for further in-kind goods. However, cash funding is required to support the ongoing operation and maintain the high operational performance and profile so far achieved. There is also an urgent requirement for an additional two relief/camp management delegates and a finance/administration delegate.

Contributions

See Annex 1 for details.

For further details please contact: Richard Hunlede, Phone: 41 22 730 4314; Fax: 41 22 733 03 95; email: hunlede@ifrc.org

Donors providing in-kind relief in response to large-scale emergencies are urged to contact the Federation’s Logistics and Resource Mobilization Department to avoid any unnecessary delays in the clearance and delivery of emergency relief assistance.

All International Federation Operations seek to adhere to the Code of Conduct and are committed to the Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response (SPHERE Project) in delivering assistance to the most vulnerable.

This operation seeks to administer to the immediate requirements of the victims of this disaster. Subsequent operations to promote sustainable development or longer-term capacity building will require additional support, and these programmes are outlined on the Federation’s website.

For further information concerning Federation operations in this or other countries, please access the Federation website at http://www.ifrc.org.

Bekele Geleta
Head
Africa Department

Peter Rees-Gildea
Head a.i.
Relationship Management Department

Mozambique - floods
ANNEX 1
APPEAL No. 10/2001 PLEDGES RECEIVED
05/07/01
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
CASH
TOTAL COVERAGE
REQUESTED IN APPEAL CHF
>
4,895,506
92.8%
CASH CARRIED FORWARD
AUSTRALIAN - RC
1,678
AUD
1,508
06.04.01
AUSTRIAN - RC
36,000
EUR
55,382
08.03.01
BRITISH - RC
16,500
USD
26,862
01.03.01
PSC IN KIND
BRITISH - GOVT/DFID
48,550
GBP
117,005
12.03.01
CANADIAN - RC
40,000
CAD
43,300
12.03.01
CANADIAN - RC
250,000
CAD
270,625
12.03.01
DANISH - GOVT
950,000
DKK
195,700
12.03.01
DANISH - RC
185,000
DKK
38,110
12.03.01
FINNISH - RC
67,275
EUR
103,496
15.03.01
LIECHTENSTEIN - RC
225,900
06.03.01
LIECHTENSTEIN - GOVT/RC
50,600
23.04.01
NETHERLANDS - GOVT
875,000
NLG
610,823
10.04.01
NEW ZEALAND - RC
5,988
NZD
4,155
12.04.01
PORTUGUESE - RC
50,000
13.03.01
SWEDISH - GOVT/RC
92,520
SEK
15,590
23.04.01
SWISS - GOVT/SOLD.CHAIN/RC
14,560
11.04.01
LOCAL TRANSPORT & DISTRIBUTION COSTS
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - RC
5,000
USD
8,140
14.04.01
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED IN CASH
1,831,756
CHF
37.4%
KIND AND SERVICES (INCLUDING PERSONNEL)
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
AMERICAN - RC
14,000
05/07/01
2 DELEGATES FOR 28 & 56 DAYS
BRITISH - RC
330,000
USD
537,240
01.03.01
1000 FAMILY TENTS, 1500 FAMILY KITS
BRITISH - GOVT/DFID
196,548
GBP
473,681
12.03.01
8438 TARPAULINS, 251 PLASTIC ROLLS 7000 JERRY CANS, 1 MIO. PURI TABS
GERMAN - RC
316,668
DEM
245,956
05/07/01
1000 KITCHEN SETS, 1000 FAMILY TENTS, 5000 BLANKETS, 2000 JERRY CANS, 3300 TARPAULINS, MEDICINE
NORWEGIAN - RC
936,740
NOK
176,387
05/07/01
12000 BLANKETS, 10000 JERRYCANS ZI, 2000 JERRYCANS CAP,
SPANISH - RC
36,197,115
PTE
274,266
05/07/01
481 TENTS, 3300 TARPAULINS, 4000 BLANKETS, 997 KITCHEN SETS
SPANISH - RC
27,000
05/07/01
4 DELEGATES
SWEDISH - RC
850,402
SEK
147,715
21.03.01
500 TENTS & FREIGHT
SWEDISH - GOVT
1,000,000
SEK
173,700
21.03.01
ERU MASS WATER
SWISS - GOVT/SOLID.CHAIN/RC
397,207
11.04.01
650 TENTS AND FAMILY KITS & TRANSPORT, HOSD & RELIEF DEL.
SWISS - RC
58,198
USD
99,704
05/07/01
650 FAMILY KITS
SWISS - RC
124,410
05/07/01
650 TENTS
Sweden Delegate(s)
5,421
Great Britain Delegate(s)
12,649
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED IN KIND/SERVICES
2,709,336
CHF
55.3%
ADDITIONAL TO APPEAL BUDGET
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
SAUDI ARABIAN - RC
1,332,757
SRI
608,810
04/09/01
1800 CARTONS FOOD STUFF, 300 TENTS, 600 BLANKETS, 300 CARPETS, 1946 KG MEDICINE
SPANISH - RC
6,671,370
PTE
50,549
05/07/01
5 RUBBHALL, 6 PILLOW TANKS,
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED
659,359
CHF