Mozambique

Mozambique: Flood Relief Preliminary Appeal No. 10/01 Situation Report No. 3

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


period covered: 20-31 March
Various flood-related factors have together created a fluid situation characterized by the continued movement of people, presenting considerable challenges to the immediate flood relief assistance activities and strategic planning process. The Federation and the Mozambique Red Cross (CVM or MRCS) have jointly indicated to Government authorities a limit of 46,324 beneficiaries to be assisted in the eight co-managed Red Cross centres. In preparation for the revised appeal (to be finalized and issued shortly), the Federation and CVM are in the midst of a strategic planning process to assess the longer-term return and rehabilitation needs of the displaced. With less than half of the appeal covered, however, further cash support is urgently needed to implement the planned activities .

The context

Twelve months after devastating floods killed over 700 people, displaced 544,000 more and caused billions of dollars-worth of damage in central and southern Mozambique, the country is again on the brink of major flooding - this time along the Zambeze river basin which cuts through the provinces of Tete, Manica, Sofala and Zambezia. An estimated 325,000 people live along the banks of the lower Zambeze in Mozambique, and all are potentially at risk. The death toll from the flooding now stands at 77 with the official figures listing nearly 500,000 affected.

Responding to the humanitarian needs, the Federation launched Preliminary Emergency Appeal 10/01 on 1 March, 2001 seeking CHF 4,895,506 to provide support to the CVM in assisting 30,000 beneficiaries for 3 months. CHF 100,000 was allocated from the Federation’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) to immediately start the delivery of relief assistance.

Latest events

Floods in the Mozambican Zambeze river basin have now entered their second month, with water remaining at two and a half to three metres above its normal level since mid-February. The number of people displaced continues to rise, particularly in the Zambeze valley in the Tete, Manica, Sofala and Zambezia provinces. Recent assessments estimates that over 200,000 people are now living in some 78 temporary accommodation centres in these four provinces, with figures rising on a daily basis in most areas. Indeed, sporadic helicopter evacuations are still taking place, as was the case in Inhangoma last week.

Trends generally indicate that there are three main factors behind the continued rise in the number of displaced people, all of which are associated with the floods in the Zambeze river basin. First, Mozambicans who were previously rescued in February had since returned home on their own initiative to tend to their livestock and crops, only to discover that they were still (or once again) flooded. Second, others who had originally refused to accept evacuation fearing for their livestock, crops, and house have since had to be rescued. Finally, people’s scarce crops and food reserves left after the floods have been used up. So while they may still have a home to live in, they have a shortage of food. Consequently, they have made their way to the temporary accommodation centres, in search of help.

These factors have created a fluid movement of people, with the number of beneficiaries in the different centres varying on a daily basis, resulting in the Government’s Emergency Committee (INGC) and humanitarian organizations finding the whole strategic planning process a considerable challenge.

The water level in the Zambeze river basin still fluctuates, but is generally stabilizing. The two main Zambian dams on the Zambeze - the Kafue and the Kariba - continued to release large quantities of water downstream: the Kariba dam with two gates open discharging 3,800 m³/second at the end of March. The Mozambican Cahora Bassa Dam was receiving an incoming flow of 12.237 m³/second on 22 March, the highest level recorded in March, forcing it to discharge 8,420 m³/second from four of its eight gates two days later. However, by 28 March Cahora Bassa’s outgoing flow was reduced to 6,513 m³/second. According to various hydrological reports, over the last days of March the river levels in the area of operation have stabilized, but 50-75 mm of rain fell in Northern Zambia and Southern Congo last weekend, which could impact on the Zambeze river levels. Rain is also predicted in northern Mozambique for the first few days of April.

Red Cross/Red Crescent action

Despite the steady but continued rising number of internally displaced persons arriving in the eight managed/co-managed Federation and Mozambique Red Cross (CVM or MRCS) temporary accommodation centres over the past few weeks, no major problems have occurred. The Red Cross teams have been working hard to consolidate the logistical pipeline and distribution of non-food items and services for beneficiaries in centres it is responsible for assisting, and to accommodate the needs of new arrivals in the centres. Red Cross teams are currently managing or jointly managing centres (many of the centres have an overall Management Committee, consisting of a member of the local government administration and the major humanitarian organizations operating in the centre) which accommodate some 25% of the total number of beneficiaries displaced in camps. Efforts to increase the water and sanitation facilities, and to consistently provide non-food items have been effective, while first aid/health facilities and services have also been consolidated, in conjunction with the government and other humanitarian organizations.

In addition to the eight Red Cross managed/co-managed temporary accommodation centres funded through the Federation Appeal, CVM volunteers are working in 21 other centres in the three flood affected provinces. In a proportion of the 20 non-managed centres, the CVM volunteers provide the majority of Red Cross traditional activities (first aid/health, preventative health programmes, mine awareness, tracing, social and psycho-social support, and the identification/training of new CVM volunteers), whereas in other centres the CVM is focusing exclusively on first aid and disseminating essential preventative health care messages to the centre’s population. The CVM and Federation are therefore currently active in 28 temporary accommodation centres, with its input in the non-managed centres fluctuating in accordance with the changing needs, other humanitarian organizations’ involvement, and the increased number of vulnerable displaced people.

The Secretary General of the CVM and the Federation’s Mozambique Head of Delegation have written to the INGC informing them of the limit of 46,324 the Red Cross has set on the number of displaced persons it can assist in the eight centres it co-manages. The CVM’s provincial delegation and the Federation’s sub-delegation in Beira, Sofala, have reiterated this message to the provincial administration and local INGC; and the Red Cross field teams are transmitting the same message to district officials.

This Red Cross commitment includes the provision of shelter (tents and tarpaulins), a full range of non-food relief items (kitchen sets, blankets, mosquito nets, buckets, etc.), while being responsible for water and sanitation facilitates, and first aid/health services in conjunction with other humanitarian organizations and the government. While the overall ceiling is set at assisting 46,324 beneficiaries, there is flexibility in the provincial and centre divisions within this overall figure, which is clearly necessary, given the fluid movement of people. However, already in some of the Red Cross managed/co-managed centres, the numbers are exceeding the planned maximum beneficiary figure and appear set to rise still further.

The CVM and Federation would like to be in a position to offer services to the populations in the Red Cross managed and co-managed centres (even if the figure exceeds 46,324) as well as assistance to the most vulnerable in other non-managed Red Cross centres, but this is contingent on the needs being met for the current target caseload of beneficiaries (46,324) , with additional assistance dependent on the generosity of the donor community.

Red Cross managed/co-managed centres, with current beneficiary status:

Province
District
Operational
Centre
Red Cross
Co-managed
Centres
Current
Centre Pop.
Planned
Max no. of
Displaced to
Receive RC
Support
Discrepancies
Sofala Caia Caia Amilcar
Cabral
10,038 Caia: 20,038 -3,695
Zangue 6,343
Chupanga Chupanga 18,169 Chupanga: 15,000 3,169
Tete Mutarara Mutarara Charre 4,744 Mutarara: 5,000 -256
Zambezia Mopeia Mopeia 24 de Julho 2,586 Mopeia: 6,286 546
Ntata 2,355
Sede 814
Posto da Campo Bajone 1,077
TOTAL 8 Centres 46,126 46,324 -236

Due to the increased number of internally displaced, the immediate needs in some non-Red Cross managed centres have not been sufficiently covered. Indeed, displaced people can be seen sitting huddled together overnight in the heavy rain, having to make do with the makeshift huts they have made from banana leaves nearby, with a lack of water and sanitation facilities, sporadic distributions of food and non-food items, and the Red Cross and other organizations fearing an outbreak of disease. One such centre is Nensa, where the Red Cross is liaising with Food for the Hungry International (FHI) in order to provide available sheets of Federation-donated tarpaulin for the centre which currently has a population of 5,623 people. The Red Cross, with MSF and Oxfam, are also assisting in the provision of clean water.

In preparation for a revised appeal, the Federation and CVM have begun a strategic planning process to assess the longer-term return and rehabilitation needs of the displaced with community leaders, the INGC and other organizations. The central and local government are anxious to persuade many communities now living in the temporary settlement centres to move to new permanent resettlement sites on higher ground in the Zambeze Valley. INGC officials are already disseminating messages to people in refuge, suggesting that, upon their eventual departure from the centres, they should not return to their original homes, which frequently suffer from flooding, but should take-up permanent residence in the proposed resettlement sites.

Within the Red Cross operation, the Federation’s Mozambique Delegation and CVM have experienced considerable change of staff over the past week. Due to the crisis, delegates already stationed in Mozambique and the neighbouring Regional Delegation in Harare - and national CVM and Federation staff - were temporarily reassigned from their normal duties to work on the emergency floods operation. They are gradually being replaced by delegates and staff recruited specifically for this operation. The Federation now has three new Team Leaders firmly in place in Chupanga, Caia and Mutarara, and a replacement logistics delegate in Caia, with another logistics delegate expected in Beira on Tuesday 3 April. Additionally, all the FACT team members have now departed from Mozambique.

The Head of Delegation, new Beira Head of Sub-Delegation, together with the new Maputo-based Programme Coordinator traveled to Beira, Caia and Mutarara between 19-21 March. Unfortunately due to the Caia-Chupanga road condition being poor, this section of the field trip had to be postponed. At the sub-delegation and in the field, the management team met with Federation and CVM staff to gain a clearer understand of the fluctuating beneficiary numbers in the centres, to discuss the Red Cross’s commitment in specific centres, and the whole planning process for the next phase of the floods operation.

Beira Logistical Support Centre

The status of major roads in and out of Beira has fluctuated over the past two weeks, causing many logistical constraints for the Red Cross operation. While the road between Beira and Caia was open for several days, enabling a convoy of five rented 4x4 trucks, hired by the Red Cross, to successfully reach Caia and Chupanga, last week this road closed for several days again. Two UN staff members were also reported to have been wounded using this route when their vehicle hit a landmine which had been dislodged by a small landslide. Additionally, 4x4 trucks are now scarce in Beira, as many are utilized for the transportation of food items up to Caia. The road into Beira from Maputo and Harare was also closed, with water levels reported on 28 March at the Pungue crossing of 8.47. On the evening of 29 March this road again reopened, but was reported to be in very poor condition. Road conditions between Caia and Chupanga also deteriorated further during the week, but fortunately remained passable to 4x4 vehicles. The road from Tete, through Malawi to Mutarara, is functioning which means that road transportation can support the Mutarara relief operation (necessitating however a huge journey from Beira itself).

These logistical constraints have exacerbated the situation for humanitarian operations in the flood affected areas. With the status of the roads changing rapidly, longer-term road transportation planning is difficult to achieve, resulting in the delivery of humanitarian items being relatively slow, and/or expensive for all agencies. Fortunately the Red Cross has experienced no major shortages of urgently required items in the centres it manages, with a sporadic but functioning pipeline being achieved through the diversification of transportation modes and adopting a flexible logistical approach. It is anticipated that the road situation should settle over the coming week, thereby enabling essential cargo to be transported to the operational areas far more quickly and a more stable pipeline to be established.

Deliveries into Beira

  • A Norwegian Red Cross chartered plane arrived in Beira on 22 March, with the following items: 12,000 jerry cans; 12,000 blankets and four cholera kits.
  • Additionally, with the Pungue river crossing open for several days at a time, trucks in transit were finally able to access Beira by road from South Africa and Zimbabwe, delivering the following: 1,500 locally purchased and a further 500 privately donated pieces of plastic sheeting on 22 March; 1,500 British Red Cross family kits on 23 March; 1,896 kitchen sets, 1,000 blankets, 50 Volunteer Basic Units and other miscellaneous items dispatched from the Harare Regional Delegation on 24 March; 1,000 British Red Cross ridge tents and 650 Swiss Red Cross cottage tents on 30 March; and 7,000 British Red Cross jerry cans on 31 March.

The Federation delegation is enormously relieved that these items have finally arrived in Beira, with their onward transit north being planned as soon as possible. On 21 March, a DC-3 fixed wing aircraft joined the J-LOC co-ordinated air transportation pool in Beira, being allocated to the shipment of non-food items between Beira and Caia and conducting four rotations on a daily basis. Since then the Red Cross and other humanitarian organizations’ non-food items have been dispatched regularly, greatly enhancing the overall humanitarian operation. Additionally, helicopters have been available most days to transport Red Cross staff and items from Caia to Mutarara (as road access remains impossible).

However, the fate of both air transportation systems is currently being discussed, with the Red Cross and other humanitarian actors hoping that this service will continue to be available in the coming weeks after which time the condition of the roads should have improved. Contingency planning is underway in case this service comes to an end, including plans to use boats and barges (but rivers are currently too difficult to navigate). Additionally, the CVM and Federation are concerned that, without air transport between Beira and Caia, and between Caia and Mutarara, staff could be placed in a vulnerable position, particularly if medical evacuations are necessary. To date, over eight CVM and Federation staff have been suspected of contracting malaria, with urgent medical evacuations already being necessary out of both Mutarara and Chupanga.

Deliveries from Beira

In the meantime, the Red Cross has utilized every available flight capacity on J-LOC’s DC-3/Buffalo fixed-wing aircraft, transporting 64 metric tons of the following items from Beira to Caia between 21-30 March:

  • 735 pieces of plastic sheeting, 250 kitchen sets, 695 family kits and 200 tents, funded by the British Red Cross;
  • 511 Spanish Red Cross funded tents (which, due to a lack of space, could not be shipped with the Federation/Spanish Red Cross’s convoy);
  • 39 blankets and 138 cholera kit boxes, funded by the Norwegian Red Cross; and
  • 3,400 litres of diesel.

The Federation and CVM have distributed (up to 29 March) and have in-country stock and waiting to be distributed the following supplies, as of 31 March, 2001:
Item
Appeal
In Stock (Moz)
Distributed by 4 Red Cross Field Offices in 8 Centres
Caia
Chupanga
Mutarara
Zambezia
Total
Tents
5,500
3,130
1,720
1,038
276
95
3,129
Tarpaulins
6,000
3,309
806
1,795
123
470
3,194
Plastic Sheeting
600 rolls
4,040
335
80
415
Blankets
12,000
13,120
2,888*
9,140
244
275
12,547
Soap Bars
9,000 kg
3,371
920
3,000
1,662
153
5,735
Mosquito Nets
12,000
1,700
3,477
3,350
244
7,071
Kitchen Sets
6,000
4,893
896*
1,409
100
2,405
Jerry Cans
12,000
34,673
3,189
3,190
249
135
6,763
Buckets
12,000
1,852
1,059
50
246
200
1,555
Used Clothes
200 bales
600
576
35
611
* Adjusted figure

The above chart takes into account family kits delivered and distributed, with the content of each kit consisting of: 1 tent; 2 blankets; 2 jerry cans; 2 buckets; 2 mosquito nets; 1 kitchen set; 2 pieces of used clothes and 1.5 kg of soap. To date, 1,500 family kits have been donated by the British Red Cross. They have proved to be enormously popular among beneficiaries.

Caia

The Caia Field Office has a total of two delegates, one team leader/camp manager and one logistician, with the latter, in conjunction with the CVM counterpart, co-ordinating all incoming items from Beira, and their onward transportation to Mutarara and Chupanga. While this new logistician arrived last week, the team was also reinforced by the Maputo-based Logistics Coordinator, who focused on establishing tighter logistical control systems and procedures for both the Caia and Mutarara Red Cross Field Offices. Last week the Red Cross storage capacity was expanded in Caia, with the erection of a mobile warehouse (Rubb-hall) in the nearby school grounds, resulting in a total storage capacity of some 500 square metres. This is particularly necessary now that the road from Beira to Caia is likely to be more operational, resulting in larger shipments of items arriving into Caia by road than is possible by air.

The Red Cross Caia Field Office is also responsible for managing/co-managing the Amilcar Cabral and Zangue temporary accommodation centres, and for manning first aid posts in six other centres (Nhambalo/Gangala, Magagade, Tchetcha, Sombreiro, CFM, 25 de Setembro). Consequently, this Field Office has activities in a total of nine centres.

The Amilcar Cabral Temporary Accommodation Centre accommodates a static 10,038 beneficiaries, while the Zangue Temporary Accommodation Centre is still attracting new beneficiaries. The current figure for all of Zangue Centre is 6,343 people, although this figure fluctuates continually. The Field Office has stressed that the maximum beneficiaries to be supported in the two Red Cross managed/co-managed centres is 20,000, with the current total beneficiary figures standing at 16,472.

Distributions of Red Cross non-food items progress well in both camps, with further family kits, tents and pieces of tarpaulin distributed last week (see relief chart). Currently seven CVM volunteers work in each of Amilcar Cabral and Zangue, hand-in-hand with the other humanitarian organizations operating in Caia (WFP, ACF, Caritas, MSF) and with the government. These volunteers focus their work on the following areas of general camp management: beneficiary registration; relief distributions; water/sanitation; preventative health care sessions and are particularly strong in the area of first aid. An additional 40 CVM Volunteers work in the six non-Red Cross managed camps supported by this Field Office, again particularly in the area of first aid.

Mutarara (Tete)

As of 31 March, the Red Cross Mutarara Field Office has one Federation team leader/camp manager, who works hand-in-hand with his CVM counterparts. The operation was enhanced last week when the telecommunication delegate, with his CVM counterpart, established a VHF and HF radio system in the Field Office, based in Mutarara village. Six VHF handsets were distributed between the Federation, Swedish/German Red Cross ERU and CVM staff, ensuring that communication is now possible between those operating out of Mutarara village, where the office is based, and Charre temporary accommodation centre, some 15 km away (one hour’s drive), and between Caia and Beira. This has not only improved the operational effectiveness of the programmes in Mutarara, but is also essential for the safety of staff.

While the CVM and the Federation team have two vehicles at their disposal, they are in need of a replacement pick-up, as their current pick-up is in poor condition and therefore unsuitable for the rough roads in this remote area of Tete Province. The Federation’s 10 metric ton truck, which departed Beira on 30 March to travel through Malawi to Mutarara, will be based with the Field Team, thereby enhancing the team’s capacity to transport items, and will be used for distributions in the centres themselves.

The Red Cross Mutarara Field Office has to deal with all incoming items from Caia and is responsible for the management of Charre Temporary Accommodation Centre, which currently has a population of 4,744 displaced persons. In addition to 12 CVM volunteers operating in Charre Centre, a further 64 CVM volunteers work in first aid posts in the following six other centres: Mandua; Mutarara - Sede; Baue; Nkoletche; Chicote and Inhangome. Consequently, the team has activities in a total of seven centres in the area, some of which are located in fairly remote regions. Over the course of the week, helicopter rescue operations occurred in Inhangoma, with some of the rescued people being relocated to the Mutarara region. As such, the beneficiary figures for the centres, including Charre, fluctuate on a daily basis. However, the Red Cross has stressed that it can only commit itself to the provision of non-food items and other camp activities for a maximum of 5,000 beneficiaries, with the latest figures already suggesting that Charre centre alone accommodates 4,744 beneficiaries.

The Swedish Red Cross Water and Sanitation Emergency Response Unit (ERU) became operational over the weekend of 24/25 March. The ERU is stationed in Charre centre and is managed and equipped by the Swedish Red Cross, with staffing from the Swedish and German Red Cross. Now that the team of five members have fully established the ERU, they are in a position to slowly phase-down their manpower, with two ERU delegates due to leave Mozambique during the first ten days of April. The ERU currently provides 70m² of water for 6,000-7,000 beneficiaries per day, with MSF being responsible for the transportation. If the trucking capacity can be increased, the ERU will be in a position to provide higher volumes of water for more beneficiaries, to include those in neighbouring centres. Additionally, the ERU members have been providing support to the MSF team during the week to install a new water tank in the hospital grounds.

Chupanga

A new Federation camp manager/team leader delegate supplied by the Spanish Red Cross arrived in Chupanga on 26 March. Unfortunately on the same day, the SRC logistician in Chupanga had to be evacuated due to suspected malaria. The Spanish Red Cross delegation in Maputo has agreed to replace this logistician, who will travel with the Federation’s Maputo-based Programme Coordinator on 2 April to reinforce the Chupanga Federation team. The Red Cross Field Team has been very effective in setting-up the jointly-managed Chupanga centre, with a good pipeline established for this area via the road from Caia. In addition to items flown from Beira to Caia, then transported by road to Chupanga, five 4x4 trucks hired by the CVM, the Federation, and the Spanish Red Cross arrived in Chupanga from Beira a week ago. This was the first time Red Cross trucks have managed to successfully travel between these two points since February.

New displaced persons continue to arrive in the jointly-managed Chupanga Sede Temporary Accommodation Centre on a daily basis. The Government/INGC had proposed swelling the camp to 15,000 persons only last week, with the CVM and the Federation agreeing that 15,000 would be their limit of the numbers of people receiving support. However, according to the latest figures, Chupanga centre has a current beneficiary figure of 18,169 people (3,743 families), with the CVM, in conjunction with FHI and the government, working together on registering new arrivals and conducting regular night-time recounts of beneficiaries.

The increase in beneficiary figures is dramatic, with the CVM and FHI volunteers recent (21 March) night-time recount concluding that 2,478 families were living in this centre. That showed over 1,000 families had arrived in the past ten days, of which many are in search of food with their crops having been destroyed by the floods. Additionally, according to the findings of a World Health Organization analysis conducted from 19-23 March, children in the centre suffer from mixed malnutrition, conjunctivitis and anaemia. Children under five years old were found to be particularly vulnerable, as were pregnant mothers. The report suggested that a rapid nutrition assessment was necessary and dependent on the results, a targeted supplementary feeding programme for children under five and pregnant women should commence, distributing dry rations in Chupanga centre.

Additionally, in the neighbouring Nensa Temporary Accommodation Centre which currently holds 5,623 people, the majority of occupants have received no non-food items at all, living in makeshift huts. A total of 20 CVM volunteers work in this camp, particularly in the area of first aid. Nonetheless, the general centre conditions are extremely poor, lacking suitable latrines and other amenities, with staff fearing an outbreak of disease (a Norwegian Red Cross Cholera Kit is on standby in Chupanga). The Health Minister visited this centre over the weekend, raising his concern about the conditions in this centre and requesting the Red Cross to assist. While the CVM and the Federation do not manage this camp, they are supporting its water needs, in conjunction with other organizations, and will shortly be distributing tarpaulins. The Red Cross Field Office hope to also be in a position to distribute other non-food items (dependent on the stocks available), to the largely neglected centre population.

Mopeia (Zambezia)

The CVM are continuing to provide a full range of services throughout Zambezia, but targeting their efforts particularly on Mopeia district, where provincial staff have joined 53 volunteers to focus their work in the following temporary accommodation centres: 24 de Julho, 2,586 beneficiaries; Intata, 2,355; Sede, 814; and Bajone, 1,077. Activities include:

  • Registration of displaced persons at the temporary accommodation centres;
  • First aid and health education, as well as supporting the Ministry of Health vaccination activities;
  • Water and sanitation, including the construction of 37 latrines, chlorination of water, garbage collection, and sanitation education;
  • Mine awareness;
  • Social activities - including support to orphans and other particularly vulnerable groups;
  • Tracing and family reunification activities.

Outstanding needs

Further cash support is urgently required.

Contributions

See Annex 1 for details.

Bekele Geleta
Head
Africa Department

Peter Rees-Gildea
Head a.i.
Relationship Management Department

This and other reports on Federation operations are available on the Federation’s website: http://www.ifrc.org

Mozambique - floods
ANNEX 1
APPEAL No. 10/2001 PLEDGES RECEIVED
04/03/01
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
CASH
TOTAL COVERAGE
REQUESTED IN APPEAL CHF
>
4,895,506
52.1%
CASH CARRIED FORWARD
AUSTRIAN - RC
36,000
EUR
55,382
08.03.01
BRITISH - RC
16,500
USD
26,862
01.03.01
PSC IN KIND
BRITISH - GOVT/DFID
48,550
GBP
117,005
12.03.01
CANADIAN - RC
40,000
CAD
43,300
12.03.01
CANADIAN - RC
250,000
CAD
270,625
12.03.01
DANISH - GOVT
950,000
DKK
195,700
12.03.01
DANISH - RC
185,000
DKK
38,110
12.03.01
FINNISH - RC
67,275
EUR
103,496
15.03.01
LIECHTENSTEIN - RC
225,900
06.03.01
PORTUGUESE - RC
50,000
13.03.01
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED IN CASH
1,126,380
CHF
23.0%
KIND AND SERVICES (INCLUDING PERSONNEL)
DONOR CATEGORY QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
BRITISH - RC
330,000
USD
537,240
01.03.01
1000 FAMILY TENTS, 1500 FAMILY KITS
BRITISH - GOVT/DFID
196,548
GBP
473,681
12.03.01
8438 TARPAULINS, 251 PLASTIC ROLLS
7000 JERRY CANS, 1 MIO. PURI TABS
SWEDISH - RC
850,402
SEK
147,715
21.03.01
500 TENTS & FREIGHT
SWEDISH - RC
521,049
SEK
90,506
21.03.01
3 DELEGATES
SWEDISH - GOVT
1,000,000
SEK
173,700
21.03.01
ERU MASS WATER
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED IN KIND/SERVICES
1,422,842
CHF
29.1%
ADDITIONAL TO APPEAL BUDGET
DONOR CATEGORY QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED
CHF
THE FOLLOWING PROJECTS ARE LINKED TO THIS APPEAL: