Mozambique

Mozambique: Flood Relief Preliminary Appeal No. 10/01 Situation Report No. 2

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


Period covered: 9 - 20 March
Recent assessments and reports indicate that the situation has started to improve with the danger of further flooding receding. The Mozambique Red Cross Society (CVM or MRCS), supported by the Federation, is continuing to mount an effective relief response, collaborating with the Government and other agencies in the process. The number of beneficiaries has been increased from 30,000 to 46,300, and a revised appeal will be issued shortly to reflect return and rehabilitation plans. With less than half of the appeal covered, further cash support is required to carry out the remaining activities to the planned beneficiaries.

The context

Twelve months after devastating floods killed over 700 people, displaced 544,000 more and caused billions of dollars-worth of damage in central and southern Mozambique, the country is again on the brink of major flooding - this time along the Zambeze river basin which cuts through the provinces of Tete, Manica, Sofala and Zambezia. An estimated 325,000 people live along the banks of the lower Zambeze in Mozambique, and all are potentially at risk. The death toll from the flooding now stands at 77 with the official figures listing nearly 500,000 affected and 90,000 displaced from their homes.

Latest events

The level of the Zambeze river appears, at last, to be stabilizing. Upstream, the Kariba dam in Zambia has for a week only been discharging water through two of its flood gates, half the previous figure. Mozambique’s principal dam on the river, Cahora Bassa, was therefore able to reduce its outflows to 7,000 m³/second on 18-19 March, the lowest since 25 February. Managers at Cahora Bassa have declared themselves content to let the water level in the reservoir to rise to a depth of 329 metres by 15 April, from the current level of 326.37 metres. All this means that despite continuing heavy rains in the Zambezi river valley area and the collection basins for the river in other parts of southern Africa, the situation has stabilized and the chances of further major flooding are receding slightly.

Fears of further massive flooding were also eased by the veering of tropical cyclone Dera south along the Mozambique Channel and into the southern Indian Ocean after it appeared to be about to strike central provinces of the country. National weather predictions are also forecasting average to below-average rainfall in the provinces of Tete, Manica, Sofala and Zambezia over the next ten days. The improving situation and the reluctance of Mozambicans to be rescued from high ground by helicopter led to the South African air force ending its support operation in Mozambique on March 15. The Mozambique Emergency Committee (INGC) announced that it thought the move was premature, but the SAAF declared that it would return if necessary. However, its decision seriously diminished the air capacity available for humanitarian flights out of the operational centres of Beira and Caia - particularly for helicopter services.

This exacerbated the chronic logistical situation for humanitarian operations in the flood affected areas. The main roads between Beira and Caia, and into Beira from Maputo and Zimbabwe were continually closed due to flooding, greatly slowing the relief efforts and adding to the cost of the operations by forcing supplies to be moved by air. These roads, when they did open and tempt convoys into beginning journeys, were frequently flood damaged again within 24 hours, leaving precious cargo stuck for days.

The Mozambican Government announced that so far it has received USD 11 million in response to its February appeal to the international community for USD 36.5 million to assist flood victims. The United Nations launched its own appeal for US$ 10.7 million on 8 March.

Red Cross/Red Crescent action

The Federation and CVM teams continue their work of establishing camps in the three operational centres of Caia and Chupanga (Sofala province) and Mutarara (Tete province), which are steadily and continually increasing their populations of displaced people from other parts of the lower Zambeze river basin. In addition, CVM activists ands staff in Zambezia province are supporting displaced persons in other accommodation centres in Mopeia and Posto da Campo. The operation has been hampered, however, by the slow arrival of relief goods once the CVM and Federation delegation’s disaster preparedness stocks and German Red Cross emergency planeload of items had been distributed. Once supplies mobilized by the launching of the preliminary appeal (1 March) began arriving in-country on 14 March, severe logistical problems into and out of Beira delayed their rapid onward transportation to the camps.

The Federation and CVM and other major humanitarian agencies in Mozambique are also increasingly concerned at the accuracy of the figures on the number of affected and displaced persons cited by the Mozambique Government. Its Emergency Committee (INGC) has not changed its statistics since 6 March, which put the number of people affected by the flooding at 494,500 with 89,894 displaced from their homes. Yet proper registration remains to be made of displaced persons in many areas, and in some places where Red Cross personnel are working the actual numbers are proving to be significantly below the official figures.

The biggest problem area is in Mutarara, where the Federation and CVM are completing work on the first of two camps in Charre. Latest figures from the INGC in Tete put the number of displaced persons in Charre I at 5,844, but the Federation and CVM team on the basis of the number of tents they have established at the camp, occupancy rates and water consumption estimate a maximum of between 2,500-3,000 people are living there. Similarly, work is soon to begin on establishing Charre II camp, once tents and other vital supplies are received from Caia. The INGC statistics indicate 7,366 displaced persons, but again the Federation and CVM believe only 2,000-2,500 people are in this encampment as well.

The Red Cross is working urgently both to establish adequate facilities at the camps for which it has taken responsibility for service provision, and establish accurate registrations. This is made more difficult by the fact that local authorities are moving more displaced persons into Red Cross camps as others are closed, such as in Zangue in Caia, where the population has risen three-fold in the last week.

The Federation and CVM have therefore proposed the following limits to the INGC as to the number of beneficiaries it will be prepared to support in accommodation centres with a full range of relief services including shelter (tents and tarpaulins), the distribution of family kits, health, water and sanitation services:

Operational Centre Camp
Current Beneficiaries
Maximum Beneficiaries
Tete: Mutarara Charre
2,500*
5,000
Sofala: Caia Almilcar Cabral
10,038
10,038
Zangue I & II
2,340
10,000
Chupanga Chupanga sede
10,500*
15,000
Zambezia: Mopeia Yosina Machel
1,186
1,186
24 de Julho
250
250
Zonas Verdes
821
821
Posto da Campo Dombe
594
594
Bajane
3,187
3,187
Calenga
248
248
Total
31,664
46,324

* To be confirmed

Working conditions for Federation and CVM staff are difficult in the camps. A total of eight staff are currently suspected of suffering from malaria, which is particularly bad in the Caia and Mutarara areas. Five were flown out of Mutarara on 20 March to Tete and Beira to recuperate.

The Federation and CVM have distributed and have in stock in-country and waiting to be distributed the following supplies as of 20 March:

Item
Appeal
In Stock (Moz)
Distributed
Caia
Chupanga
Mutarara
Zambezia
Total
Family Tents
5,500
1,481
1,065
350
210
45
1,670
Tarpaulins
6,000
3,309
371
720
80
1,171
Plastic Sheeting
600 rolls
2,040
335
80
365
Blankets
12,000
120
4,400
2,240
210
175
7,025
Soap Bars
9,000 kg
3,371
600
3,000
320
3,920
Mosquito Nets
12,000
200
2,990
1,115
210
4,315
Kitchen Sets
6,000
2,997
908
380
100
1,388
Jerry Cans
12,000
15,673
2,544
1,040
210
50
3,844
Buckets
12,000
1,852
492
50
542
Used Clothes
200 bales
55
55

The Federation is also awaiting final confirmation of an emergency aid proposal to ECHO which includes funding for 5,000 blankets, 12,000 kangas (clothing), 4,000 kitchen sets and 2,000 mosquito nets. If this proposal is confirmed, the existing in-kind needs of the Preliminary Appeal of 1 March will be broadly met for the initial target population of 30,000 beneficiaries. However, with the likely growth in numbers in the Red Cross camps to just over 46,000 beneficiaries and the need to replenish the disaster preparedness stocks of the Mozambique Red Cross, many outstanding in-kind needs remain (see below). The badly-needed delegate replacements have been arriving in Mozambique to reinforce the relief programme. A Programme Coordinator, Head of Sub-Delegation, reporting delegate and two relief/camp management delegates have arrived in the last few days, with a logistics delegate expected to arrive on 23 March.

Beira Logistical Support Centre

Two planes chartered by the British Red Cross have arrived in Beira, the first on 14 March containing 5,238 tarpaulins and 251 rolls of plastic sheeting; the second on 20 March carrying 3,200 tarpaulins. Another plane chartered by the Spanish Red Cross containing 4,000 blankets, 3,300 tarpaulins, 481 tents five small Rubbhalls (mobile warehouses), 997 kitchen sets, six bladder tanks (10 m³ capacity) and four tap stands landed on 18 March.

Because of the fragility and uncertainty of the roads to the flood areas, transportation of supplies is proving extremely difficult and expensive. The CVM and Federation are faced with the prospect of having to fly all goods from Beira to Caia by fixed wing aircraft, and all goods from Caia to Mutarara by helicopter. Small airfields in Chupanga and Mutarara are now reported to have been established, but are so far untested by Red Cross flights. No adequate boats and landing quays are available to ferry goods by boat across the Zambeze to Mutarara, although there are plans to bring a barge.

The Federation signed an agreement with a private NGO, Air Serv, to pay for 100 flying hours of a Caravan fixed wing aircraft based in Beira. The hours will be placed inside the aircraft pool system used by all humanitarian organizations and 35 hours will be backdated to cover flights made since 1 March. This contract commitment of USD 80,000 is as yet uncovered. In addition, the German Red Cross/German Government have agreed with the Federation to use their grant of USD 80,000-worth of flight time to pay for helicopter airlift capacity out of Caia to Mutarara. Both of these airlift resources will be entered into the J-LOC air management coordination system, which means that they will be allocated according to need by all humanitarian agencies.

The J-LOC system has been prioritizing food, water and sanitation, and shelter items for air transportation between Beira and Caia. However, with the arrival on 21 March of a DC-3 which is designated initially to move non-food items, the Red Cross supplies in the Beira warehouse can now be rapidly transported to the field. So far, the J-Loc coordinated transport system has carried 616 mt of food, 364 mt of non-food supplies and 61 mt of fuel. This includes 57 mt of Red Cross supplies (16% of the total non-food items).

Following heavy rainfall on March 19-21, the main road into Beira from Maputo and Zimbabwe remains blocked just west of Dondo, where a bridge over the Pungoe River is impassable due to the high water levels. This artery into Beira is expected to be closed for several more days now. As a result the Federation was forced to arrange the airlift of 1,000 British Red Cross-funded tents 7,000 jerry cans and 500 family kits on 20-21 March to Beira from Chimoio in Manica province. A further 1,056,000 British Red Cross water purification tablets, which were expected by air to Beira on 20 March, failed to arrive, possibly due to the bad weather conditions.

Five 4x4 trucks hired by the CVM, the Federation, and Spanish Red Cross left Beira for Caia on 21 March carrying the bulk of the SRC air consignment. Meanwhile, 500 Swedish Red Cross tents and 650 Swiss Red Cross Tents began their journey to Beira from Pretoria (South Africa) on 21 March. If the road to Beira remains closed they, too, will have to be airlifted to Beira or Caia from Chimoio.

Virtually the last goods from the CVM and Federation’s stocks in Maputo were also transported over the last ten days to Beira, including 3,800 mosquito nets, 100 tents, 900 blankets, kitchen sets, clothing, one Rubbhall and other miscellaneous items. CVM and Federation representatives also met officials from Mozambique customs and the INGC last week to discuss ways to speed up the clearance of Red Cross relief goods into the country.

Mutarara (Tete)

A total of 26,000 displaced persons are estimated to be in the Mutarara area. Aside from the two camps at Charre assigned to the Red Cross another four camps exist in Mutarara: two in the town itself, another 10 km from Mutarara town, the fourth built on swamp land, managed by MSF.

Apparently, the occupants of this camp were scheduled to be moved to Charre but they will not leave as they have cattle with them and local officials are concerned about the risks the animals may bring to human health.

Red Cross teams have now established completely the camp named Charre I, complete with a warehouse close to the camp Although 5,800 beneficiaries are reported to be receiving food from WFP, CVM, and the Federation staff in the area estimate the real camp figure to be half this size. Charre I is now full, and as such no newcomers are being accepted. Twelve CVM trained volunteers are working in First Aid Posts set up in the camp, with support from a CVM provincial health specialist and an MSF Doctor.

MSF is also currently providing water, but will pull out once the Swedish Red Cross water and sanitation ERU becomes operational (which is expected to be 22-23 March). The order for the deployment of an ERU was made on 9 March after it became clear that no clean water provision was possible for camp inhabitants in Charre from other agencies. The management and technical equipment is provided by the Swedish Red Cross, with staffing from the Swedish and German Red Cross National Societies. The five-person ERU team arrived last week in Mozambique, The ERU equipment began to arrive in Caia directly from Harare on 15 March with the last consignment of chemicals being delivered in Beira on 21st. All goods were airlifted by helicopter to Mutarara, with the exception of the unit’s 4x4 landcruiser, which has to be driven, via Malawi, to the flooded area. The Federation and CVM are discussing with other humanitarian agencies the ERU providing additional clean water for other camp populations in Mutarara.

Work will now begin by the Red Cross teams on establishing Charre II camp - 2 km from its neighbour. At the moment, approximately 2,000 - 2,500 people are estimated to be living at the site, which the Red Cross teams will have to establish properly on a more organized footing.

As road access to Mutarara is now possible from Tete via Malawi for 4x4 vehicles and small trucks, the CVM and Federation have decided to send a 4WD pick-up and truck from Tete town to ease the chronic lack of operational transport capacity in Mutarara. On 21-22 March, HF radio communication was being established to improve the poor communication links with Mutarara following the breakdown of Red Cross satellite phones earlier in the week.

Caia

An estimated 25,000 displaced people are thought to be sheltering in Caia altogether of which half, 12,378, were being supported by the Red Cross in three camps, Almilcar Cabral (10,308), and Zangue I and II (2,340). However, in the last few days, the population of Zangue I and II has risen to over 9,000 persons, as displaced people move into the camp from other centres which are being closed or for other reasons (possibly availability of relief). The Federation and CVM have therefore set a limit of 10,000 people they are prepared to support at this camp.

Previous registrations of displaced persons in Caia were conducted with the help of CVM volunteers. CVM staff and volunteers also continue to dig latrines in the camps, with 45 so far completed in Amilcar Cabral and 35 in Zangue I & II. Water chlorination activities by CVM activists continues in these as in all camps where the Red Cross is active.

Seventeen CVM first aid volunteers were trained last week and are now working in all three camps. The Ministry of Health (MoH) is taking a lead role in the health sector, providing five nurses with CVM volunteers working alongside them in the first aid posts established in each camp. Each post sees around 50 patients per day, mainly suffering from malaria & diarrhoea. The MoH has begun a vaccination campaign covering measles for children and meningitis for children/adults. The CVM are also running the first aid post in another camp, Nhambalo, but are not involved in the camp management.

Chupanga

As of 20 March the official number of displaced persons in Chupanga sede camp stood at 13,000, however CVM and the Federation teams believe that 10,500 is a more realistic figure. During the night of 21 March a head count was to be conducted by CVM and Food for the Hungry International (FHI) volunteers, to ascertain exact beneficiary numbers. People have been arriving in Chupanga sede camp on a daily basis, and the government and INGC have proposed swelling the camp further to 15,000 persons. This level has been agreed between the CVM and Federation as the limit receiving its support.

The CVM and Federation have assisted in establishing three first aid/health tents and a dispensary, where volunteers work alongside seven MOH nurses. The Red Cross has built 42 latrines (of a target of 50), and is in charge of all water and sanitation in the camp. More interventions in this sector are planned when further watsan supplies arrive later this week.

CVM volunteers have also begun preparing beneficiary listings ahead of further non-food supplies arriving provided by the Spanish Red Cross. Twenty-two newly-trained CVM volunteers are working with four experienced CVM volunteers from Beira in the camp. Four government teachers are also teaching 350 children in a camp school and school materials are being procured by the German Red Cross.

Nensa Camp

In the neighbouring Nensa Camp, (6,000 displaced persons) managed by the Mozambican Government and FHI, four CVM Volunteers started training new volunteers in preventative health care.

Mopeia and Posto da Campo

CVM activists and provincial staff are continuing to provide assistance to 6,286 persons in six accommodation centres in Mopeia and Posto da Campo, focusing mostly on health activities. The needs of these people are reported to be acute and the CVM and Federation have decided to establish Mopeia as a fourth operational centre with a more wide-ranging provision of services. Preventive and curative health activities are also ongoing by CVM staff and volunteers in Quelimane, Nicodoala and Maganje da Costa.

Outstanding needs

The in-kind needs, including coverage of the increased beneficiary caseload and the replenishment of Mozambique DP stocks are as follows:

Item
1 March Appeal (30,000 Benefic.)
Increased Need (+16,000 Benefic.)
DPP Stock
Total Need
In Stock
Distributed
Pledged (*)
Outstanding
Family Tents
5,500
3,000
3,000
11,500
1,481
1,670
4,655
3,694
Tarpaulins
6,000
3,000
6,000
15,000
3,309
1,171
8,438
2,082
Plastic Sheeting
600 rolls
300
300
1,200
2,040
365
2,510
708
Blankets
12,000
6,000
12,000
30,000
120
7,025
20,650
2,205
Soap Bars
9,000 kg
4,500
4,500
18,000
3,371
3,920
10,709
Mosquito Nets
12,000
6,000
6,000
24,000
200
4,315
2,150
17,335
Kitchen Sets
6,000
3,000
6,000
15,000
2,997
1,388
1,500
9,155
Jerry Cans
12,000
6,000
12,000
30,000
15,673
3,844
29,650
Buckets
12,000
6,000
6,000
24,000
1,852
542
3,650
17,956
Used Clothes
2000 bales
1,000
1,000
4,000
55
10
3,935

* Does not include ECHO Proposal

There is now an urgent need for an experienced logistician, two relief and finance and administration delegates for the relief operation in Mozambique.

Contributions

See Annex 1 for details.

Bekele Geleta
Head
Africa Department

Peter Rees-Gildea
Head a.i.
Relationship Management Department

Annex 1

Mozambique - floods
APPEAL No. 10/2001
PLEDGES RECEIVED
03/23/01
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
CASH
REQUESTED IN APPEAL CHF
4,895,506
TOTAL COVERAGE 52.1%
CASH CARRIED FORWARD
AUSTRIAN - RC
36,000
EUR
55,382
08.03.01
BRITISH - RC
16,500
USD
26,862
01.03.01
PSC IN KIND
BRITISH - GOVT/DFID
48,550
GBP
117,005
12.03.01
CANADIAN - RC
40,000
CAD
43,300
12.03.01
CANADIAN - RC
250,000
CAD
270,625
12.03.01
DANISH - GOVT
950,000
DKK
195,700
12.03.01
DANISH - RC
185,000
DKK
38,110
12.03.01
FINNISH - RC
67,275
EUR
103,496
15.03.01
LIECHTENSTEIN - RC
225,900
06.03.01
PORTUGUESE - RC
50,000
13.03.01
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED IN CASH
1,126,380
CHF
23.0%
KIND AND SERVICES (INCLUDING PERSONNEL)
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
BRITISH - RC
330,000
USD
537,240
01.03.01
1000 FAMILY TENTS, 1500 FAMILY KITS
BRITISH - GOVT/DFID
196,548
GBP
473,681
12.03.01
8438 TARPAULINS, 251 PLASTIC ROLLS 7000 JERRY CANS, 1 MIO. PURI TABS
SWEDISH - RC
850,402
SEK
147,715
21.03.01
500 TENTS & FREIGHT
SWEDISH - RC
521,049
SEK
90,506
21.03.01
3 DELEGATES
SWEDISH - GOVT
1,000,000
SEK
173,700
21.03.01
ERU MASS WATER
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED IN KIND/SERVICES
1,422,842
CHF
29.1%
ADDITIONAL TO APPEAL BUDGET
DONOR
CATEGORY
QUANTITY
UNIT
VALUE CHF
DATE
COMMENT
SUB/TOTAL RECEIVED
CHF
THE FOLLOWING PROJECTS ARE LINKED TO THIS APPEAL: