Mozambique

Mozambique: Flood Relief and Rehabilitation Appeal no: 10/2001

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Appeal
Source
Posted
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THIS REVISED APPEAL SEEKS CHF 7,275,200
IN CASH, KIND AND SERVICES
TO ASSIST 223,000 BENEFICIARIES FOR 10 MONTHS
Contributions received to date on the Preliminary Appeal launched on 1 March 2001 by the International Federation totals CHF 5,604,600. With this revision to the budget and taking into account contributions already received, a further CHF 1,670,600 is needed to complete the proposed operation.

The Situation

Mozambique’s central provinces were severely flooded since mid-February, with water levels consistently measuring at least 1.5 metres above the safe level. According to the government and United Nations, over 200,000 square kilometres of land was destroyed in the Zambeze river basin's four provinces: Sofala, Manica, Tete and Zambezia, which is 70,000 more square kilometres than the floods further south last year.

The total number of flood-affected people is estimated to be 513,314, of which 223,095 have taken refuge in 65 temporary accommodation centres in the four provinces. The UN's Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) stated that 71,900 hectares of cultivated land and the respective crop area were destroyed. The floods not only devastated land and lives, but also the infrastructure (housing and public buildings, roads and telecommunications networks), which is crippling to a country with an annual per capita GDP of approximately USD 240, where almost 70 per cent of the population lives in absolute poverty.

While many roads are still submerged under water, others began to drain, enabling them to be repaired and reopened. This eased the enormous logistical constraints encountered by all partners involved in the humanitarian operation since the start of the crisis. However, the remaining flood area constitutes stagnant water, causing an increase in waterborne diseases. In April, cholera was officially confirmed to have been contracted by patients in Tete province and later in Sofala province, with malaria also increasing in the flood-affected areas.

Although the number of people taking refuge in the temporary accommodation centres stabilized at the end of April, the inhabitants are reluctant to leave the centres; many know that they have not only lost their dwelling, but also their land, crops and livestock. Even those who have a house to return to question how they will feed their families, as their crops and food supplies were destroyed. The World Food Programme (WFP) will provide at least a one-month food ration to those people prepared to return home, or resettle to higher ground, with UN and humanitarian agencies also distributing tool and seed kits to the internally displaced.

Nonetheless, the rehabilitation phase of the flood operation will not be easy. Mozambique is still struggling to recover from last year's record rainfall and Cyclone Eline, which affected nearly 30 per cent of the population. This year’s floods affected an even larger geographical area, and the government was slow to establish a coherent, comprehensive resettlement plan for the displaced people, partly because of its own scarce resources to carry one out. Sixty new resettlement areas in the four flood-affected provinces are currently in the process of being identified, with post-flood and rehabilitation projects being established at the community level.

The Needs

Immediate Needs

From the earliest days of the initial flooding in Zambezia province in January, the Mozambique Red Cross (Cruz Vermelha de Moçambique, CVM) and the Federation made a major contribution to the emergency relief phase of the overall flood operation. They had already pre-positioned parts of 4,000 family kits in central, provincial and district warehouses across the whole country as part of the disaster preparedness (DP) contingency plans developed last year and funded at the end of 2000 by a number of national societies. In addition, CVM staff and technicians had attended DP workshops in January to prepare them for possible emergency situations. As a result, in Zambezia, then Sofala, Tete and Manica, the CVM and Federation were able to progressively scale up their disaster response as the situation unfolded, utilizing fully the emergency stocks and trained personnel at their disposal.

The arrival of the bulk of the remainder of the ordered DP stocks in time for the start of the crisis enabled the Federation to rush the entire consignments to the emergency areas for immediate distributions. In addition, human resources available within the partner national societies implementing rehabilitation projects from last year’s floods in Mozambique were also used in a completely integrated and efficient way.

Sixty-five temporary accommodation centres were officially established for the internally displaced in the four affected provinces by the government, in conjunction with humanitarian organizations. Following a needs assessment by the Federation, CVM and participating national society staff working in Mozambique in February, the Federation and the national society focused their major emergency response action on seven of the largest temporary accommodation centres in three provinces. The Red Cross agreed to manage or jointly manage with other humanitarian organizations these camps, providing a full basket of services, shelter and non-food items for internally displaced people taking refuge in the centres, as follows:

Federation/CVM activities in seven managed/jointly managed temporary accommodation centres:

Centre
Province
No of
Volunteer
Relief
Shelter
First
Aware
Water
Sanitation
People
s
Aid
-ness
Amilcar Cabral
Sofala
12,584
9
yes
yes
yes
yes
jointly
jointly
Zangue
Sofala
6,254
9
yes
yes
yes
yes
jointly
jointly
Chupanga
Sofala
20,133
23
yes
yes
yes
yes
jointly
jointly
Charre
Tete
4,744
12
yes
yes
yes
yes
ERU
yes
24 deJulho
Zambezia
4,345
48
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Intata
Zambezia
3,900
shared
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
Bajone
Zambezia
797
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
yes
TOTAL
52,757
101
all
all
all
all
4+joint
4+joint

As outlined in the Federation’s Preliminary Appeal launched on 1 March, an initial ceiling of 30,000 was placed on the total number of beneficiaries to be assisted by the Federation/CVM in the seven centres, with the ceiling being increased to 46,324 in mid-March as the number of inhabitants in the targeted centres grew larger. Since then the number of beneficiaries has increased still further in these centres to nearly 53,000. The non-Red Cross managed centres in Mandua and Nensa (14,342 beneficiaries in total) were also identified by the Federation/CVM for relief distributions, as non-food needs there were not covered by other humanitarian organizations. Consequently, beneficiaries taking refuge in the seven managed/jointly managed centres and in the two additional non-managed centres were the Federation/CVM's target beneficiaries for the full range of non-food support services and relief items during the initial emergency phase of the operation, with these beneficiaries in the nine centres totalling 67,047 at the beginning of May. This support was provided as planned despite enormous logistical challenges linked to the lack of road access for many weeks to the four Red Cross operational centres in Caia, Chupanga (Sofala), Mutarara (Tete) and Mopeia (Zambezia) - see Situation Reports and Mozambique Ops Updates issued between March and May for further details.

In June, the Federation/CVM will distribute relief/resettlement kits to a further 4,000 vulnerable flood-affected families (some 20,000 people) living in non-Red Cross-managed camps who have not received these items from other organizations. Consequently, the total target number of beneficiaries to receive relief items from the Federation/CVM will be over 87,000, with this extensive operation not being possible without support from the European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO), private donors and the following National Societies: American, Australian, Austrian, British, Canadian, Danish, Finnish, German, Netherlands, New Zealand, Liechtenstein, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish, Swiss and United Arab Emirates. Emergency relief items distributed by the Federation/CVM in the centres:


Item
DP and Appeal items distributed by four RC Field Offices
(excluding 4,000 relief/resettlement kits for June distribution)

Percentage
distributed/plan
Caia Chupanga Mutarara Zambezia Other* Total
Family tents
1,331
1,038
745
95
399
3,608
90%
Tarpaulins
2,868
4,939
701
1,470
3,676
13,654
98%
Plastic sheeting (rolls)
8
113
42
80
243
27%
Blankets
6,790
9,140
3,278
2,565
3,948
25,721
103%
Soap bars (kg)
4,508
3,407
1,871
2,690
12,476
92%
Mosquito nets
5,254
3,398
818
2,290
11,760
65%
Kitchen sets
3,359
3,322
953
1,245
8,879
99%
Jerry cans
8,472
5,783
1,717
2,425
4,906
23,303
123%
Buckets
1,433
75
1,700
2,490
23
5,721
41%
* Other relates to relief distributions in Nensa and Mandua non-Red Cross managed centres.

In addition to its intensive and wide-ranging commitments in nine temporary centres, the Federation and CVM were also active in another 49 centres/isolated communities, which at the beginning of May accommodated over 170,000 beneficiaries. While these centres and isolated communities are not managed by the Red Cross, CVM volunteers conducted the following activities:

  • first aid (including referring the most seriously ill to health centres);
  • preventative health/hygiene dissemination sessions;
  • water chlorination.

In a proportion of the centres and isolated communities, CVM volunteers also provided:
  • water and sanitation services, to include well rehabilitation;
  • advocating the government's resettlement programme;
  • tracing, message and family reunification services;
  • mine awareness dissemination sessions;
  • social and psycho-social support.

In May, the following number of CVM volunteers were actively involved in the flood programme:
Tete
Sofala
Manica
Zambezia
Total
128 volunteers
176 volunteers
83 volunteers
150 volunteers
537 volunteers

A total of 340 of the 537 polyvalent CVM volunteers working in the flood-affected provinces are provided with financial incentives from the Federation, to support their living expenses, enabling them to work on a daily basis during the emergency phase of the operation (1 March to 30 June). They will and have carried out traditional Red Cross activities in the seven Red Cross-managed temporary accommodation centres and in the 49 additional temporary accommodation centres/isolated communities, as displayed in the following chart.

CVM non-managed centres/isolated communities, which accommodate over 170,000 people

Province
District
Centre/area
Province
District
Centre/area
Sofala
Caia
Nhambalo/Gangala
Tete
Mutarara
Baue
Sombreiro
Nkoletche
Magagade
Manica
Chicote
Tchetcha
Inhangoma
CFM
Zambezia
Mopeia
Zonas Verdes
25 de Setembro
Marruma
Marromeu
Nensa (incl. relief)
Nhacatundo
Nhamatanda
Muda-Mufo
Nauere
Machongo
Valeta
Dondo
Mutua
Zanza
Buzi
Companhia Buzi
Namirere
Buzi Sede
Calendane
Martinote
Sede
Lusalite
Mongane
Cheringoma
Santove
Catel
Matondo
Quelimane
Sampene
Nangue
Nicodala
Mucelo
Chemba
Vila Sede
Majanja
Morla
Chimbue
Manica
Tambara
Nhacolo sede
Nhango
Sabeta
Macanga
Nhacafula
Senhabuzua
Sussundenga
Madibunhane
Machanga
Machanga
Mabanha
Chibabava
Chibabava
TOTAL
TOTAL
TOTAL
Tete
Mutarara
Mandua (incl.relief)
4
15
49
Mutarara Sede
provinces
districts
centres

Red Cross activities will be supported in the temporary accommodation centres and for the isolated communities until those centres are closed and people have either returned to their homes or relocated in new resettlement areas. Indeed, as water levels fell, beneficiaries started to leave some centres from mid-May, with the majority of centres anticipated to be closed by the end of June. Support in the centres is therefore planned for a total maximum period of four months (March to June).

In summary, the Federation/CVM has or will be supporting more than 223,000 beneficiaries, providing the following assistance during the emergency phase:

  • non-food, shelter and camp management facilities/services in seven Red Cross-managed or jointly managed temporary accommodation centres, accommodating 52,757 beneficiaries;
  • Red Cross services (first aid, health/hygiene awareness sessions and water chlorination) in a further 49 non-Red Cross-managed centres/isolated communities, accommodating some 170,000 people, including the provision of non-food items in two of these centres (Nensa and Mandua), which accommodate 14,343 beneficiaries; and,;
  • relief/resettlement kits for 20,000 newly identified relief beneficiaries (of which the majority were/are accommodated in the above mentioned 49 centres/isolated communities), in June. From the beginning of July, the Federation/CVM's rehabilitation phase of the programme commences, concluding on 31 December 2001. The rehabilitation phase of the 2001 flood operation takes into consideration CVM/Federation's involvement in two consecutive flood operations and other programme commitments which are ongoing, as follows:;
  • flood rehabilitation activities launched in July 2000;;
  • 2001-2002 Country Assistance Strategy (CAS) programmes in the fields of disaster preparedness, community health (African Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies Health Initiative), water and sanitation, HIV/AIDS, and institutional and resource development.;

Projects were therefore designed and planned as follows:
  • to complement, rather than duplicate, the above mentioned programme commitments;;
  • to ensure projects do not overburden the national society, being focused in provinces and districts not heavily involved in the 2000 rehabilitation and 2001 CAS programme;;
  • to address simultaneously community based rehabilitation/other unmet needs, and develop CVM's longer-term capacity, enabling it to respond to community-based needs and emergencies more effectively in the future; and, . to ensure that the mechanisms and resources are in place, enabling projects to be fully and effectively implemented, within the agreed time frame, with their designed impact.

CVM relief/rehabilitation projects in the coming seven months to be supported by the Federation are as follows:
  • distribution of 4,000 relief/resettlement kits, targeting beneficiaries whose needs were unmet by other humanitarian organizations during the emergency operation;;
  • procurement and pre-positioning of national DP stock and equipment to replenish the stocks utilized by the CVM/Federation during the emergency phase of the flood relief operation;;
  • implementation of a DP pilot project in the central zonal region, with a particular focus on Zambezia province and the upgrading of CVM's telecommunication systems in the central zonal region;;
  • implementation of water/sanitation rehabilitation projects, focused in six target district areas, five in Zambezia province and one in Tete province;;
  • implementation of community based health projects in Sofala, Zambezia and Tete provinces, utilizing CVM's network of supplementary feeding volunteers and the provision of support for six CVM supplementary feeding health technicians.

The Ministry of Health and UNICEF, in an assessment in eight flood affected districts, found that an average of 18.5 per cent of children surveyed between the ages of zero and five, were suffering from malnutrition in late April. They decided to establish a programme providing nutritional education and supplementary feeding, targeting children up to five years of age and pregnant or breast-feeding mothers. CVM volunteers will be involved in the implementation of this supplementary feeding programme in seven districts in Zambezia and Sofala, in conjunction with the Ministry of Health and UNICEF, and in one district in Tete, with the Ministry of Health, MSF and World Vision. CVM’s supplementary feeding volunteers will also be involved in preventative and curative health practices, first aid and awareness sessions. All components of the supplementary feeding programme are funded, with the exception of six Federation-supported CVM health technicians, who will be responsible for supervising the community based volunteer work during the rehabilitation phase.

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