Mozambique

CARE gets a lift from Boeing to Mozambique

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ATLANTA (March 28, 2000) -- The Mozambique national airline Linhas Aéreas de Moçcambique (LAM) today took delivery of its first Boeing 767-200ER, which carried relief supplies for CARE from Johannesburg, South Africa to Maputo, Mozambique. The Boeing Company contributed $55,000 for CARE to purchase the cargo for the flight to distribute to cyclone and flood survivors.
"This generous gift from The Boeing Company and LAM strengthens CARE's efforts to provide immediate assistance to thousands of survivors in Mozambique," said Peter D. Bell, CARE president and CEO. "CARE will then increasingly move into longer-term sustainable interventions to help families get back on their feet."

Using the Boeing contribution, CARE purchased 9.9 tons of cargo in South Africa, including 25 fifty-person tents, plastic sheeting for temporary camp shelters and 539 pounds of oral rehydration solution. CARE coordinated the loading and shipment of the relief supplies in partnership with Boeing and LAM.

"The flooding and devastation in southern Africa are unlike any seen before," said John Warner, senior vice president and chief administrative officer of The Boeing Company. "We are grateful to CARE and LAM for their partnership in this mission, and are greatly moved by the determination and will of the people of Mozambique."

About CARE

CARE is one of the world's largest private international relief and development organizations with more than 50 years of experience. CARE's mission is to relieve human suffering, to provide economic opportunity and to build sustained capacity for self-help. For more information about CARE and its many self-help programs in more than 60 countries, browse the CARE web site or call 1-800-521-CARE.

About Boeing

Since 1992, Boeing, its airline customers and nonprofit humanitarian organizations have participated in 11 relief flights to Africa. Nearly 40,000 pounds of airlifted medicine, food, computers and school items have improved health care, nutrition and education for people in eight African nations. Over the past eight years, Boeing International Relief Delivery flights have coordinated a total of 125 humanitarian missions, transporting roughly 2 million pounds of relief supplies to hurt, hungry and homeless people around the world.