Appeal Mexico Hurricane Pauline

Report
from Action by Churches Together International
Published on 01 Nov 1997
APPEAL
Mexico Hurricane Pauline - LAME71
Appeal Target : US$ 392,535
(Funding Received To Date = $ 149,580)
Dear Friends, Geneva, November 01, 1997

Hurricane Pauline, reported to be the worst natural disaster to hit Mexico in more than a decade, has left a trail of death and destruction along the Mexican coastline between the cities of Acapulco and Oaxaca and extending up to 50 kilometers inland. The official death toll currently stands at 217, but more than 2000 persons are missing. An estimated 300,000 people are homeless in the aftermath of the devastation.

ACT members, Church World Service (ACT/CWS) and the United Methodist Committee on Relief (ACT/UMCOR) have been providing assistance and relief to victims of the hurricane since the first days following the storm. Recently, their assessment teams have returned from Mexico with additional information concerning the vital assistance necessary to begin to rebuild lives and homes. They have appealed to ACT for support and funding to provide food, blankets, medicine, tools and shelter repair materials to hurricane affected families. We thank you in advance for your support.

Implementing Partners: Church World Service - Guerranese Council & Oaxaca Local Organizations
United Methodist Committee on Relief - Methodist Church of Mexico

Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

For further information, please contact:
ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (phone ++41 22 791 6032 or mobile phone ++ 41 89 203 6055)
or ACT Appeals Officer, Dirk Van Gorp (phone +41 22 791 6040)

Rev. Myra Blyth Miriam Lutz Rev. Rudolf Hinz
Director ACT Co-ordinator Director
WCC/Unit IV LWF/World Service

Ecumenical Centre, 150 route de Ferney , P.O. Box 2100, 1211 Geneva 2, Switzerland
Phone: ++41 22 791 6033 Fax: ++41 22 791 6506 E-mail: act@wcc-coe.org Telex: 415 730 OIK CH

I. Requesting ACT Member Church or Agency

Church World Service - USA (ACT/CWS)

II. Implementing Member or Partner Information

ACT/CWS Emergency Response Office is the humanitarian relief agency of the National Council of Churches of the USA - 34 denominations and communions working together to meet human needs. ACT/CWS is responding to this emergency through their regional representative, Samuel Lobato, who is based in Mexico City.

Guerrero
The Guerense Council (400 Communities): Is an idigenous social organization at the state level. Established in 1991 it coordinates 8 sub-regional organizations that cover 30 municipalities with a poplulation of 282,000 persons.

Costa Chica Presbytery: In the Costa Chica area there are 19 Presbyterian congregations.

Oxaca
The Social Pastoral Ministry of the Diocese and Caritas of the Archdiocese of Oxaca has jurisdiction over 70 municipalities which were affected by the hurricane.

The Good Shepherd' First Evangelical Baptist Church is a congregation of the Baptist National Convention of Mexico located in Miahuatian presently working with 2.400 persons.

Human Rights Indigenous Organizations (OIDHO): Is a peasant indigenous organization created by 30 communities for the defense of human rights and promotion of self-development of its people.

Forum of Civil Organizations in the State of Oxaca (FOCO): Is composed of 36 NGOs in Oaxaca. Their work entails productive activities with street children and in defense and promotion of human rights, development, education, sexual health, counseling, training, environment, and community health. FOCO has a coordinating commission and a special commission to assist victims of the hurricane.

ACT/CWS will provide targeted relief assistance through the above local partners and organizations.

III. Description of Emergency or Disaster Situation

On October 10, Hurricane Pauline ravaged the Mexican western Pacific coastal states of Guerrero and Oaxaca, causing massive damages in one of country's most impoverished regions. The official death toll now stands at 217, and the Mexican Red Cross estimates that more than 2,000 people remain homeless. A total of 600,000 persons were in some way affected by the storm, one of the worst to hit Mexico's western Pacific coast in recent memory. In Acapulco, government officials at all levels have been criticized for inadequate relief and cleanup efforts. The tourist areas were the first to be cleaned up and to have services restored. Cleanup efforts in the poorer surrounding areas have lagged behind and drinking water remains in short supply. Many residents are forced to bathe in sewage-laden water. At least 20 cases of cholera have been reported.

The most serious needs remain in the rural areas, where food shortages are critical due to isolation of many areas and the difficulties in getting into remote mountain communities cut off by washed-out roads and bridges. Many communities continue to experience serious food shortages. Except for the well known tourist areas, most of the affected population is of indigenous origin from the Amuzgo, Mixteco, Tiapeaneco, Nuhua, Huave, Zapoteco and Chatino ethnic groups.

Guerrero: While the number of casualties is still not known, the extent of damage in Guerrero was considerable. The Guerrenese Council, an indigenous self-help organization, reports widespread destruction to homes, crops, schools, and other public buildings. The most seriously affected regions were the areas of Costa Chica, and Montana Baja.

Oaxaca: Nearly all 97% of the state's 122,000 hectare corn crop was destroyed by the hurricane. Additional crop destruction in this predominately agricultural region included 29,600 hectares of coffee, as well as scattered crops of beans, papaya, lemon and bananas. Other destruction includes 179 water systems (affecting 160,000 persons), serious damage to 250 health centres, 5,400 houses completely destroyed, 48,600 houses damaged, 62% of secondary roads destroyed, 27 bridges damaged, 16 schools completely destroyed, and 60 schools suffered major damages.

IV. Emergency Response Goal and Objectives

To provide short term emergency relief to indigenous families and communities primarily in rural and isolated areas devastated by Hurricane Pauline.

V. Beneficiary Information

Guerrero: Estimated 2500 persons (Materials for home repair)

Oaxaca: Estimated 29,000 persons, or 5,800 families (Food, blankets, tools)

VI. Description of Emergency Assistance To Be Provided

Guerrero: Provision of reconstruction repair materials for homes. Further assessment of needs
will continue.

Oaxaca: Transport and provision of basic food relief to 5,800 families for one month. Food
supplies will include corn, beans, rice, sugar, powdered milk and salt.

Transport and provision of 18,000 blankets to 5,800 families.

Transport and provision of tools for cleanup and reconstruction including shovels,
pickaxes, hammers, saws, machetes, and nails.

VII. Description of Implementation Methodology

Guerrero: Implementation of shelter repairs will be based upon a 'Self-Help' concept with people
repairing their own homes and accepting responsibility for transportation costs. ACT/CWS
partner organisation 'Guerranese Council' will organize and facilitate ACT appeal assistance.
Oaxaca: ACT/CWS will purchase and transport relief materials to affected communities. ACT appeal
assistance will be provided in cooperation with the Catholic Archdiocese and the Forum of
Civilian Organisations of Oaxaca (FOCO).

VIII. Description of Project Management, Administration, and Monitoring Procedures

ACT/CWS will provide project oversight, administration and monitoring through their regional representative, Mr. Samuel Lobato, based in Mexico City.

ACT/CWS will insure that all ACT assistance is provided in compliance with the ACT cooperation agreement, procurement policy, and reporting guidelines. Final narrative and financial reporting will be provided by ACT/CWS within 3 months from the finalization of ACT appeal assistance.

IX. Implementation Timetable For This Request

2 Months: 01 November - 31 December 1997

X. Coordination

ACT/CWS will ensure full coordination with other relief efforts in the targeted regions by the Mexican government, Red Cross and other organisations. Additionally, ACT/CWS will ensure coordination of efforts with ACT/UMCOR to prevent overlap and duplication of efforts.
XI. General:

ACT/CWS has provided initial funding of $15,000 in the Guerrero region for housing reconstruction. Additionally, ACT/CWS has committed $106,580 for purchase of blankets to be provided in the Oaxaca region targeted communities.

XII. Budget

ESTIMATED INCOME Local USD
Currency
I. ACT Network Donors
A. Confirmed Pledges and/or Donations (ACT/CWS) NA $121,580
B. Un-confirmed Pledges and/or Donations NA 0
II. Back Donor Funds
A. Confirmed Funding NA 0
B. Funding Applied For NA 0
III. In-Kind Appeal Support
A. Confirmed Donations From The ACT Network NA 0
B. Other Confirmed In-Kind Donations NA 0
Total Estimated Income $121,580

ESTIMATED BUDGET EXPENDITURES

Description Type of Unit Number of Units Cost per Unit Value in USD

I. Emergency Relief

A. Crisis & Post-Crisis Phases
Food
Maize MT 175 263 46,025
Beans MT 50 920 46,000
Rice MT 10 790 7,900
Sugar MT 8 790 6,320
Powdered Milk MT 2 6,580 13,060
Salt MT 2 600 1,200
Non Food
Soap Carton 350 25 8,750
Blankets Each 18,000 5.92 106,580
Shelter & Infrastructure
Shovels Each 1000 5.00 5,000
Pickaxes Each 1000 6.60 6,600
Metal Bars Each 300 6.60 1,980
Saws Each 1000 2.60 2,600
Machetes Each 2000 5.26 10,520
Nails Kg 1000 2.00 2,000
Total Emergency Relief: $264,535

II. Transport, Warehousing, Storage

A. Transport of Emergency Relief and Response Materials

In-Country Transport
Overland Truck, Air Lifts, Other NA NA Lump Sum 30,000
Total Transport, Warehousing, Storage: $ 30,000

III. Personnel, Administration and Operational Support

A. Staff Salaries and Support Costs To Be Provided By ACT/CWS
B. Staff Travel To Be Provided By ACT/CWS
C. Office Operational Costs To Be Provided By ACT/CWS
D. Communications Costs To Be Provided By ACT/CWS
E. Vehicle Operating Costs To Be Provided By ACT/CWS
F. Other Personnel, Administration and Operational Costs To Be Provided By ACT/CWS
Total Personnel, Administration and Operational Support: $ 15,000

TOTAL APPEAL BUDGET ACT/CWS: $ 309,535

I. Requesting ACT Member Church or Agency

United Methodist Committee on Relief/Methodist Church of Mexico (ACT/UMCOR-MCM)

II. Implementing Member or Partner Information

ACT/UMCOR is the emergency relief agency of the United Methodist Church providing humanitarian assistance in disasters worldwide.

The Methodist Church of Mexico (Iglesia Metodista MexicoA.R.) is currently under the leadership of Bishop Graciella Alzarez Delgado. Bishop Delgado requested that ACT/UMCOR assist with an assessment of the emergency needs following the hurricane, and subsequent partnership in providing assistance to victims of the hurricane.

ACT/UMCOR-MCM will provide targeted relief assistance to affected communities through their local churches and structures.

III. Description of Emergency or Disaster Situation

On October 10, Hurricane Pauline ravaged the Mexican western Pacific coastal states of Guerrero and Oaxaca, causing massive damages in one of country's most impoverished regions. The official death toll now stands at 217, and the Mexican Red Cross estimates that more than 2,000 people remain homeless. A total of 600,000 persons were in some way affected by the storm, one of the worst to hit Mexico's western Pacific coast in recent memory. In Acapulco, government officials at all levels have been criticized for inadequate relief and cleanup efforts. The resort areas were the first to be cleaned up and to have services restored. Cleanup efforts in the poorer surrounding areas have lagged behind and drinking water remains in short supply. Many residents are forced to bathe in sewage-laden water. At least 20 cases of cholera have been reported.

ACT/UMCOR-MCM staff conducted an assessment of the areas surrounding Acapulco from 19 to 24 October. Particular attention was given to the areas of Palmosola, San Isidro and Renacimento. Tremendous damages have occurred to residential structures in these areas. In many instances, entire hillsides once containing housing have been swept away. In other areas, substantial housing of concrete and steel construction has been destroyed or damaged. Homelessness is rampant in some of the areas, with people who can not find shelter with other families, forced to sleep on the ground wherever they can find some small protection from the elements. Even in those cases where homes have not been completely destroyed or swept away, they are filled with mud, silt and debris, causing families to sleep on mud caked earth in or about their homes. Many individuals have lost the accumulated possessions of several generations, and will be very hard put to return to a normal life situation in the foreseeable future. Some schools have been converted to serve as temporary shelters, but for the most part the educational system is operational.

The government has extended its cleanup efforts to residential areas nearby to the resort community. Government and Red Cross supply and aid stations are in operation, but relief supplies are in short supply and hard to come by for many persons. In several of the communities visited, no assistance has been provided by the government or Red Cross - any assistance given has come through church channels.

The Methodist Church of Mexico has been providing immediate relief assistance in the form of food, medicine and clothing to 400 families in the targeted communities. They are additionally involved in beneficiary identification and verification of needs and are prepared to act in an advocacy role for those victims who will undoubtedly 'fall through the cracks'. The Methodist Church of Mexico is part of an amalgamation of nearly sixty churches including Pentecostals, Baptists and others who have come together to create a unified effort in providing for 'unmet needs' in the affected areas.

IV. Emergency Response Goal and Objectives

To provide short term emergency relief to families and persons in communities devastated by Hurricane Pauline located in areas surrounding Acapulco.

V. Beneficiary Information

Acapulco and Surrounding Areas:

1. Emergency Relief Food: Estimated 6000 persons (1000 Families)
2.. Medical Assistance For Children & Elderly Estimated 6,000 persons (1000 Families)
3. Household Furnishings Estimated 60 persons (10 Families)

Beneficiary selection will be accomplished through an amalgamation of nearly sixty churches of various denominations in the Acapulco area. ACT/UMCOR-MCM has worked in cooperation with some fifty six local pastors from these churches to identify an additional 600 vulnerable families, in addition to the 400 families previously identified.

VI. Description of Emergency Assistance To Be Provided

1. Emergency Relief Food: Emergency food baskets will be provided to 1000 families on a weekly basis for 4 weeks. Food baskets will include bottled water, sugar, rice, milk, beans, cooking oil, pasta, eggs, chili, tomato, bread, tuna, sardines, flour, salt, soap and toilet tissue.

2. Medical Assistance: Medicines will be provided to vulnerable children and elderly persons affected by the hurricane. Medical treatment is available from government hospitals and Red Cross centres, but such treatment does not normally provide for medicaments. Disease and common infections are prevalent in the aftermath of the hurricane.

3. Household Furnishings: Provision of basic furnishings including beds, chairs, tables and stoves for 10 families affected by the total loss of their household possessions,

4. Transport of Additional Assistance: Transport costs from Mexico City to the Acapulco area for clothing, food, water, medicine and other relief supplies donated by churches throughout Mexico. It is anticipated that 4 transport trips will be necessary.

VII. Description of Implementation Methodology

Acapulco Area:
Implementation of appeal assistance will be under the supervision Bishop Delgado and the Igelsia Metodista de Mexico. The central church offices in Mexico City will be utilized as the central receiving point for all donations, both cash and in-kind.

The day to day implementation and control of the ACT appeal assistance will occur through the 'Prince of Peace Methodist Church' in Acapulco. Staff and volunteers from the church will distribute relief supplies directly to targeted beneficiaries and continuously monitor the assistance to ensure the project goals and objectives.

VIII. Description of Project Management, Administration, and Monitoring Procedures

All aspects of project management and administration will be under the direction of Bishop Delgado's office of the Iglesia Metodista de Mexico, working in cooperation with UMCOR emergency services offices and staff. Monitoring will be accomplished through the 'Prince of Peace Methodist Church' in Acapulco working cooperatively with area church leaders.

The Iglesia Metodista will provide a financial system and process for all ACT emergency appeal funds which complies with ACT guidelines and procedures. Full reporting and audits will be provided to ACT by the church offices.

ACT/UMCOR staff will work closely with Bishop Delgado and the Iglesia Metodista de Mexico during all phases of the ACT emergency assistance. Compliance with ACT cooperation agreements, policies, procedures and reporting guidelines will be maintained at all times.

IX. Implementation Timetable For This Request

2 Months: 01 November - 31 December 1997

X. Coordination

ACT/UMCOR-MCM will ensure full coordination with other relief efforts in the targeted regions by the Mexican government, Red cross and other organisations. Additionally, ACT/UMCOR-MCM will ensure coordination of efforts with ACT/CWS to prevent overlap and duplication of efforts. The amalgamation of area churches and pastors will ensure a unified effort targeting the most vulnerable families and preventing duplication of assistance.

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