Malawi + 1 more

UNICEF Malawi Humanitarian Situation Report No. 8 - August 2016

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

Malawi is experiencing its worst food security crisis in over a decade with 6.5 million people, including 3.5 million children, currently affected and in need of food assistance in 24 districts. In the month of August, the Food Security Cluster provided assistance in three districts in southern Malawi (Balaka, Chikwawa and Nsanje) in line with the MVAC projections.
However, due to funding constraints half rations of the food assistance were distributed in these areas. This raises the concern of possibility of higher malnutrition caseloads than was originally envisaged as the country moves towards the peak of the lean season. Full rations are expected to begin in September should more funding be secured.

UNICEF continues to co-lead the Malawi Nutrition Cluster supporting the continuous monitoring of the evolution of the humanitarian nutrition situation in the country and advocating for the needs of children in line with the in-country humanitarian imperative; ensuring the uninterrupted and continued lifesaving support to vulnerable children. During the month of July, a total of 3,250 children were provided with lifesaving treatment at OTPs and NRUs.

Due to funding shortfalls, UNICEF has not been able to implement some planned interventions during the reporting period. UNICEF’s Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) appeal for Malawi remains 60 per cent unfunded.

SITUATION IN NUMBERS

3.5 million Children affected

6.5 million People food insecure in urgent need of food assistance
(MVAC, National Food and Nutrition Security Forecast, April 2016 to March 2017, Bulletin No. 12/16 Volume 1)

1,748 Cholera cases with 46 deaths
(Ministry of Health, Weekly Cholera Update 8 - 14 August 2016)

2,093 Mozambican Population of Concern in Malawi
(UNHCR, 26 August 2016)

UNICEF Appeal 2016
US$13,035,000
60% Funding Gap

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

Malawi is experiencing its worst food security crisis in over a decade with 6.5 million people, including 3.5 million children, currently affected and in need of food assistance in 24 districts. This represents 39 per cent of the country’s population and the needs vary across the affected districts. The lean season spans from July 2016 to March 2017, when the humanitarian situation is expected to peak among the most vulnerable children and women.

The Food Insecurity Response Plan (FIRP), which was launched on 13 July 2016 by the Government of Malawi in collaboration with the UN and NGOs through the humanitarian clusters, identifies Food Security, Nutrition, Agriculture, Health, Education and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) as the key priority sectors for immediate assistance and requires US $395 million. In the month of August, the Food Security Cluster provided assistance in three districts in the south (Balaka, Chikwawa and Nsanje); in line with the MVAC projections. However, due to funding constraints half rations of the food assistance were distributed in these areas. This raises the concern of possibility of higher malnutrition caseloads than was originally envisaged as the country moves towards the peak of the lean season. Full rations are expected to begin in September should more funding be secured.

Meanwhile maize prices continue to increase amid low income opportunities for poor and very poor households. In July 2016, prices of the maize staple were 192 per cent higher than the five-year average price and 88 per cent higher than the July 2015 average price. These abnormally high prices are reducing household access to staple food and worsening food security outcomes, especially among very poor and poor households.1 A cholera outbreak, which began in December 2015, continues to be a challenge. As of 14 August 1,748 cases with 46 deaths have cumulatively been registered representing a Case Fatality Rate (CFR) of 2.6 per cent which is above the World Health Organization recommendation. In addition, as of 22 August 2016, a total of 350 suspected cases have been reported with no deaths in a typhoid outbreak which began around 14 June 2016 and later spread into other districts such as Mwanza, Neno, and Mangochi. Contaminated drinking water and food have been identified as the potential sources of infection.

According to UNHCR statistical update of 26 August 2016, the Mozambican refugee population at Luwani camp in Mwanza District increased 2,093 from the 1,831 reported at the end of June.