Malawi + 2 more

InterAction Members Respond to the Flooding in Southern Africa May 2001

Format
News and Press Release
Source
Posted
Originally published
Press Contact: Shanta Bryant, 202-667-8227 x115
NGO Contacts: James Bishop, Director of Humanitarian Response, 202-667-8227, x104
Anita Malley, Program Associate, x105
Floods in Southern Africa

Heavy rains in the region are causing flooding in Southern Africa. In Malawi 330,000 people have been displaced by the flooding. In Mozambique, 235,000 people have been displaced by flooding in the provinces of Zambezia, Sofala, Manica, and Tete. In Zimbabwe, 30,000 people have been affected in the northeastern provinces of Mashonaland Central and Matabeleland North. Access to those affected and humanitarian needs of the displaced populations are major concerns.

InterAction members listed here are accepting contributions for assistance they or their affiliates are providing to victims of the flooding in Southern Africa. The list was produced by InterAction, a coalition of more than 165 US-based private relief, development and refugee assistance agencies. InterAction members have agreed to abide by a set of standards to ensure accountability to donors, professional competence and quality of service. Visit the following links for further information:

Reliefweb www.reliefweb.int for up-to-date information on the victims in Southern Africa
InterAction's Guide to Appropriate Giving and Donations.

Adventist Development and Relief Agency International
Mozambique
12501 Old Columbia Pike
Silver Spring, MD 20904
800-424-2372
www.adra.org

African Medical & Research Foundation USA
19 West 44th Street
Room 710
New York, NY 10036
212-768-2440
www.amref.org

Air Serv International
PO Box 3041
Redlands, CA 92373
909-793-2627
www.airserv.org/jopp1.htm

American Red Cross
International Response Fund
PO Box 37243
Washington, DC 20013
800-HELP NOW
www.RedCross.org

Catholic Relief Services
Southern Africa Flood Response Fund
209 West Fayette Street
Baltimore MD 21201
800-235-2772
www.catholicrelief.org

Christian Reformed World Relief Committee
Mozambique Flooding
2850 Kalamazoo Avenue SE
Grand Rapids, MI 49560
(800) 848-5818
www.crwrc.org

Church World Service
Southern Africa Floods #6422
PO Box 968
Elkhart, Indiana 46515
212-870-3151
www.cwserp.org

Latter-day Saint Charities
50 E North Temple Street
Seventh Floor
Salt Lake City, Utah 84150
801-240-1201

Lutheran World Relief
Southern Africa Floods
PO Box 17061
Baltimore MD 21298-9832
800-597-5972
www.lwr.org

Oxfam America
Mozambique Relief and Reconstruction Fund
PO Box 1745
Boston, MA 02105-1745
800-77-OXFAM
www.oxfamamerica.org

Save the Children
PO Box 975 - Mozambique
Westport, CT 06881
800-728-3843
www.savethechildren.org

United Methodist Committee on Relief
Flood Recovery in Mozambique and Neighboring Countries
475 Riverside Drive #330
New York, NY 10115
800-554-8583
http://www.gbgm-umc.org/umcor

World Relief
PO Box WRC
Wheaton, Ill 60189
(630) 665-0235
www.wr.org
Details of Member Assistance

World Vision
Mozambique Flood Relief
PO Box 70090
Tacoma, WA 98471-0090
888-511-6591
www.worldvision.org

Details on InterAction Member Assistance to the Victims of the Flooding in Southern Africa

Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA)
(March 16, 01)
ADRA has been delivering food to flood survivors in Maganja da Costa, Mozambique, and Shire Valley, Malawi, since end of January. Tarps are being supplied for temporary shelter. Long-term plans are being made to distribute tools and seeds after flood waters recede.

African Medical & Research Foundation USA (AMREF)
(March 8, 01)
AMREF is ensuring a supply of trained nurses, pharmaceuticals, and malaria control and water and sanitation interventions in conjunction with Ministry of Health initiatives in Mozambique.

Air Serv International
(March 16, 01)
Air Serv is providing essential flood relief aviation services in Mozambique using three fixed wing aircraft and three helicopters leased from South Africa. The aircraft are conducting flood area assessment, transporting urgent relief supplies, medicines and food, and providing relief teams with access to people who have been cut off by rising flood waters.

American Red Cross (ARC)
(March 27, 01)
ARC is procuring and transporting five World Health Kits, plastic sheeting, tarpaulins, and water buckets, and has allocated $275,000 to flood relief in Mozambique. A third American Red Cross delegate will join a two person team already in Mozambique working alongside the local Red Cross.

Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
(April 20, 01)
CRS is working with the Catholic church in Chikwawa and Blantyre dioceses to provide seeds to 16,320 farming families, a project that is worth $80,000. Since these areas are prone to flooding each year, CRS is building partner capacity to respond to these emergencies effectively in the future. In Mozambique, CRS has provided $50,000 to Caritas Mocambicana to provide basic food rations to 7,000 people for three months, and to provide seeds and tools to 1400 affected families.

Christian Reformed World Relief Committee (CRWRC)
(March 6, 01)
CRWRC, with Dorcas Aid International, has released funds for emergency supplies and evacuation costs and provided a boat for rescue operations. CRWRC is assessing the situation and planning for a seed distribution project in May.

Church World Service (CWS)
(March 26, 01)
CWS is providing material resources and financial assistance to partners organizations, including the Christian Council of Mozambique, Christian Care in Zimbabwe, and CARD in Malawi.

Latter-day Saint Charities (LDSC)
(March 27, 01)
LDSC is sending 164,000 lbs. of clothing and 42,000 lbs. of soap to Mozambique. Additionally, $18,000 in funds was donated for survival kits, which include blankets, mosquito netting, insect repellant, plastic sheeting, and sanitation items. To Malawi, 333,000 lbs. of clothing and 40,000 lbs. of soap will be donated.

Lutheran World Relief (LWR)
(April 23, 01)
LWR and its local partners are providing food and non-food supplies including tinned fish, biscuits, water containers, plastic sheeting, clothing, kitchen sets, blankets, mosquito nets, and sanitary items to approximately 15,000 people in Northern Sofala. Others in temporary shelters are receiving clean water and improved sanitation. LWR has sent an initial $10,000 and material resources valued at $530,000. For more details, please see: http://www.lwr.org/action/emergenc/01/mozfact.html

Oxfam America
(March 16, 01)
In Mozambique, Oxfam America is providing emergency water and sanitation facilities, as well as survival kits and assistance with home reconstruction. Oxfam's focus will be on meeting immediate needs with a complimentary emphasis on long-term rehabilitation and self sufficiency.

Save the Children
(March 20, 01)
Save the Children will initially target a population of 25,000 for three months. After helping people move to high ground from risk areas, Save will provide basic supplies, including tents, blankets, mosquito nets, water chlorination kits, and soaps. On March 5, Save chartered a plane to deliver 42 tons of relief supplies to the area.

United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
(March 5, 01)
The disaster response network of the United Methodist Church in Mozambique is delivering food, tents, netting and other relief items to the affected areas. In Malawi, UMCOR's partner ACT (Action by Churches Together) is providing tents, blankets, and other relief items.

World Relief
(March 23, 01)
World Relief is currently putting together a clean water program and is in the process of finalizing a seed and tool distribution program to be conducted with their church partners. They are also considering a shelter program in the near future.

World Vision
(April 5, 01)
In Mozambique, World Vision is providing food, water and health care to the displaced in Sena, Nkolechi, Traquino, Bawe Sede, Pinde and Megaza in partnership with MSF, Red Cross-Mozambique and UNICEF. World Vision anticipates setting up at least 12 camps by July 2001, and staff members are currently discussing plans for rebuilding infrastructure and for developing new food schemes.