Liberia

ACT appeal Liberia: Assistance to IDPs and Refugees - AFLR-31

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Appeal Target: US$ 2,099,170
Balance Requested from ACT Network: US$ 1,884,170
Geneva, 29 January 2003

Dear Colleagues,

The escalation of fighting between the security forces of the government of Liberia and the LURD dissidents from the end of 2001 throughout 2002, in Lofa Gbarpolu, Bomi, Cape Mount and Bong Counties caused displacements of tens of thousands of people from northern and western Liberia. There are currently approximately 190,000 Liberians living in 14 internally displaced camps and almost as many more living in homes of relatives. It has been indicated that the majority of the IDP population is women and children. Continuous fighting during 2002 has resulted in fear of those displaced, that return to their homes will be dangerous and inadvisable. In any case, most communities of origin have been completely destroyed. It is also believed that until the presidential elections scheduled for late this year are resolved and result in a convincing and sustainable peace, displaced persons will opt to wait and see and allow themselves to languish in Displaced Camps until safe living conditions can be re-assured.

The fighting in Ivory Coast has also added to the humanitarian problem in Liberia as thousands of Liberians who had been living as refugees in Ivory Coast had to flee back into Liberia. In addition, a number of Ivorians fled into Liberia as refugees.

ACT members in Liberia have formed an ACT forum and together have made efforts to co-ordinate their response in assisting the IDPs and refugees. Currently, the following members are in the appeal, Lutheran World federation / World Service (LWF/WS): Camp management, Shelter, Water and Sanitation, Psycho-social, Non Food Items, and Social Services, Lutheran Church in Liberia (LCL): Food and Non Food Items distribution, Health services, and Trauma Counselling, United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR): Heath, Shelter, and Camp Management, Liberia Council of Churches/United Methodist Church (LCC/UMC): Education, Agriculture, and Health. Other LCC partners wishing to be part of this appeal are the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), and Concerned Christian Community (CCC). However, these two organisations are still in the process of finalising their proposals to form part of this appeal. The appeal is therefore, likely to be revised at a later stage to include the two proposals.

Project Completion Date:

LCL - 31 December 2003
LCC/UMC - 31 December 2003
LWF - 31 December 2003
UMCOR - 30 June 2003

Summary of Appeal Targets, Pledges/Contributions Received and Balance Requested

LCL
LWF
LCC / UMC
UMCOR
Total Target US$
Total Appeal Targets
152,150
1,616,117
207,935
122,968
2,099,170
Less: Pledges/Contr. Recd
185,000
30,000
215,000
Balance Requested from ACT Network
152,150
1,431,117
207,935
92,968
1,884,170



Please kindly send your contributions to the following ACT bank account:

Account Number - 240-432629.60A (USD)
Account Name: ACT - Action by Churches Together
UBS SA
PO Box 2600
1211 Geneva 2
SWITZERLAND

Please also inform the Finance Officer Jessie Kgoroeadira (direct tel. +4122/791.60.38, e-mail address jkg@act-intl.org) of all pledges/contributions and transfers, including funds sent direct to the implementers, now that the Pledge Form is no longer attached to the Appeal.

We would appreciate being informed of any intent to submit applications for EU, USAID and/or other back donor funding and the subsequent results. We thank you in advance for your kind co-operation.

ACT Web Site address: http://www.act-intl.org

Ms. Geneviève Jacques
Director
WCC/Cluster on Relations
John Nduna
Acting Director
ACT
Robert Granke
Director
LWF/World Service

GENERAL DESCRIPTION of the EMERGENCY SITUATION

There are approximately 190,000 Liberians living in 14 camps for internally displaced persons (IDPs) and almost as many more living in the homes of relatives. The escalation of fighting between security forces of the Government of Liberia and LURD dissidents from the end of 2001 throughout most of 2002, in Lofa, Gbarpolu, Bomi, Cape Mount and Bong Counties, caused the internal displacement of thousands of people from northern and western Liberia. Many of the IDP Camps are located in the western suburbs of the capital city of Monrovia, while other Camps are located in Totota, Bong County, Kakata, Margibi County; Buchanan, Grand Bassa County, and Ganta, Nimba County. Approximately 190,000 IDPs are living in 14 IDP Camps constructed in these areas over the past nine months.

Three rebel groups are now fighting against the government forces in the Ivory Coast. Presently the government says that there are approximately 43,000, mostly returning Liberians at the Liberian border villages waiting to be transported to their original homes and family locations. As the situation in the Ivory Coast continues to deteriorate, it is expected that tens of thousands of Ivorian refugees will cross into Liberia for safety from the fighting. The conflict developing in the Ivory Coast will exacerbate the displaced problems already in crisis in Liberia.

Continuous fighting in Liberia during 2002 has resulted in a fear of those displaced to return to their locations of origin. Most communities of origin have been completely demolished. It is also believed that until the presidential elections scheduled for late next year are resolved and result in a convincing and sustainable peace, displaced persons will opt to wait and see and allow themselves to languish in displacement camps until safe living conditions can be re-assured.

The Liberian Government launched an aggressive attack on the LURD forces that had been in control of Tubmanberg since May 2002. The LURD forces were driving back to their northern most stronghold in Voinjama. However, in October 2002 the LURD renewed fighting in the Voinjama area causing an influx of newly wounded Liberian soldiers seeking medical attention at the Phebe Hospital that LWS Administers.

Thousands of civilians are trapped into forced conscription, slavery, kidnapping, SGBV, sexual exploitation, disease, malnutrition and high infant mortality rate. Those who manage to escape the conflict nightmares are still trickling into the relatively safety of the IDP Camps. Presently, all life sustaining facilities and services are grossly inadequate for the large number of displaced persons, many of which have been displaced many times.

According to OCHA and WFP, there are approximately 190,000 IDPs in 14 camps that are in need of emergency life saving and capacity building assistance. The majority of the IDP population is women and children.

Impact on Human Lives

The crisis has caused the forced movement of approximately 190,000 persons comprising of more than 38-47,000 families. The gender distribution of this number is 30% women, 45% children and 25% men. Many of these victims of war have suffered multiple displacements in their efforts to escape the fighting. Additionally, another 100,000 persons are expected to arrive in Liberia fleeing the fighting in the Ivory Coast between November 2002 and March of 2003.

Presently, all life support assistance is grossly inadequate. Food is not of the "local basket" and is insufficient. Shelter, in most cases, is 4 by 5 meter and accommodates an average family of 5 persons (husband, wife and children); water, sanitation and medical care are clearly inadequate.

Disaster and Emergency Statistics

Reliable statistics concerning IDPs and refugees on the move and in camps are difficult to obtain, but it has recently been accepted that an estimated population of 190,000 IDPs (based on WFP's feeding statistics) are presently sheltering in the 14 IDP Camps.

Current Security Situation

Counter attacks by security forces of the Government of Liberia has changed the direction of the fighting back away from Monrovia area into territories formerly captured and held by the LURD rebel forces. Tubmanburg, Arthington (President Taylor's hometown), Bopolu and other strategic areas have been recaptured by Government security forces but are still thought to be relatively volatile. Fighting is continuing and more displaced people are still entering the IDP camps; many are not officially displaced but can not feed themselves as a result of the economic devastation of the war.

Additionally, tens of thousands of persons fleeing the Ivory Coast are expected to cross into Liberia during the next few months. The exodus has already began with more than 43,000, reports the government, now on the Liberian border awaiting assistance.

The ACT Liberia Network

The ACT Liberia Network was founded by the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), the Liberia Council of Churches (LCC), the United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR) and the Concerned Christian Community (CCC) in June 2001. The purpose of the local network is to enable local ACT partners consult amongst themselves, avoid duplication of efforts and institute joint appeals where feasible to attend to the humanitarian emergency relief and rehabilitation program in Liberia, amongst others.

The present membership of ACT Liberia Network includes LCC, LWF, UMCOR, CCC, Lutheran Church in Liberia (LCL), United Methodist Church (UMC), the Christian Health Association of Liberia (CHAL) and the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA). Membership is open to all members and affiliates of WCC AND LWF working in Liberia.

ACT is a worldwide network of churches and related agencies meeting human need through coordinated emergency response.

The ACT Coordinating Office is based with the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) in Switzerland.

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