Kenya

Kenya Situation Report, 21 Jul 2020

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

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HIGHLIGHTS

  • As of of 20 July, 13,771 people have contracted COVID-19. A phased lifting of movement and lockdown restrictions as of 6 July could lead to a further spread of the pandemic.

  • Risk communication, laboratory testing, and contact tracing are among the key challenges identified in the COVID-19 response.

  • A rapid mapping of facilities in urban informal settlements in Nairobi and Kisumu has identified solid waste management and the lack of reliable supply of water as challenging.

Situation Overview

Since the first case of COVID-19 was confirmed on 15 March, the pandemic has rapidly spread within the country. As of 20 July, the total number of confirmed cases in Kenya is 13,771 cases. Out of the country’s 47 counties, Mombasa and Nairobi City counties have the highest attack rates at 146.2 and 136.4 per 100,000 populations respectively when compared to 22.7 per 100,000 for the whole country. In the refugee camps, there are 2,510 confirmed COVID-19 cases and two deaths, eight in Dadaab and two in Kakuma.

On 6 July, the President announced a phased reopening of the country as pressure mounts to kick-start the country's ailing economy after four months of novel coronavirus restrictions. International air travel in and out of Kenya is expected to resume on 1 August, while domestic flights resumed on 15 July, subject to health regulations. The President further announced a lifting of the ban of movement in and out of the capital, Nairobi, the port city of Mombasa and north-eastern Mandera county, and extended the current nationwide curfew between 9 p.m. and 4 a.m. for a further 30 days, warning that the country would revert this measure should the situation deteriorate. Places of worship will be allowed to reopen, but restricted to one hour with a maximum of 100 people aged between 13 and 57 years. The Minister for Education announced on 7 July the cancellation of the 2020 academic year. All schools in the country will remain closed until January 2021, while colleges and universities are to reopen in September if they abide by strict guidelines.

Risk communication, laboratory testing, and contact tracing are among the key challenges identified in the response. Overall, at least 429 health workers in Kenya have tested positive for COVID-19 as of 14 July, including one doctor and two nurses who succumbed to the disease. Rising infections among health workers have been linked to several risk factors, including contact with infected patients and lack of adequate training, quality personal protective equipment (PPEs).

A rapid mapping undertaken by UNHABITAT of facilities in urban informal settlements in Nairobi and Kisumu has identified solid waste management and the lack of reliable and consistent supply of water as key challenges to containing the spread of COVID-19 in these areas. Other areas of concern include an uneven spread of WASH facilities requiring targeted interventions in underserved communities; high-cost of water services mostly managed by the private sector, which is preventing adequate access to these services; lack of partner coordination, very few potential isolation facilities, yet the majority are small and not connected to water and sewage facilities; and the need for longer-term planning to decongest highly crowded locations particularly in Kibera and Mathare settlements.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.