Kenya + 2 more

East Africa Sub Regional Programmes Annual Appeal No. 05AA004

Attachments


The International Federation's mission is to improve the lives of vulnerable people by mobilizing the power of humanity. The Federation is the world's largest humanitarian organization, and its millions of volunteers are active in over 180 countries. All international assistance to support vulnerable communities seeks to adhere to the Code of Conduct and the Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response, according to the SPHERE Project.

This document reflects a range of programmes, objectives, and related activities to be implemented in 2005, and the corresponding funding requirements.These are based upon the broader, mult i-year framework of the Federation’s Project Planning Process (PPP). The PPP products are either available through hyperlinks in the text, or can be requested through the respective regional department.

Programme Title
2005
in CHF
Strengthening the National Society
Health and Care
Kenya and Rwanda
1,324,885
Disaster Management
Rwanda
159,450
Organizational Development
Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda
975,478
Total
2,459,8131

Sub-regional context

The East Africa region is one of the most vulnerable and disaster prone in Africa suffering from both natural and man-made disasters such as; conflict, population movement, food insecurity, epidemics, political instability, poverty and economic recession. The three countries under the sub-regional office for East Africa (Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda) share political and economic characteristics and have at the same time country specific profiles. The table below on the human development indicators for these countries and the wider continent provides a glance of the situation.

In addition to the three countries mentioned above, the Nairobi Regional Delegation has integrated the activities for Burundi and Tanzania within the portfolio for East Africa sub-regional programmes. At the time of launch of this Appeal, the specific activities for 2005 for Burundi and Tanzania were not finalized, and therefore were not included. It is fully anticipated that these activities will be defined in the early months of 2005; they will then be integrate within this Appeal through the issuance of a Programme Update.


Human Development Indicators at a Glance
Category
Kenya
Rwanda
Uganda
Sub-Saharan Africa
World
Total population (millions)
31.5
8.3
25.0
641.0
6,225.0
GDP per capita (USD)
393
212
236
469
5,174
Life expectancy at birth (years): Female-Male
46.4 - 44.0
39.4 - 38.4
46.4 - 44.9
n.a.
n.a.
Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live births
78
96
82
108
56
Maternal mortality per 100,000 live births (adjusted ratio) (2000)
1,000
1,4000
880
n.a.
n.a.
Population (%) with sustainable access to an improved water source (2000)
57
41
52
57
82
HIV prevalence (%, ages 15-49) (2003)
6.7
5.1
4.1
7.7
1.1
Adult literacy rate (%, ages 15 and above)
Female - Male
78.5 - 90.0
63.4 - 75.3
59.2 - 78.8
n.a.
n.a.

Source: UNDP Human Development Report, July 2004: Human Development Index (pages 139-250). Note: Data is 2002 unless noted above.
Refer to http://hdr.undp.org/reports/global/2004/pdf/hdr04_HDI.pdf

Conflict and political instability in the Great Lakes region has taken a truly regional scope in both character and consequence in the recent years. Neighbouring states have either been actively involved in the long-running wars - and in particular that in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) - or have been directly affected as populations move across the borders. Armed non-state actors have also taken advantage of the porous borders and sought safe havens, protection or advantageous alliances with other states to continue rebellion in their own countries. A regional perspective is thus essential; unless a truly regional peace approach to resolve the fundamental issues of the conflict both within and between countries is achieved, then the cycle of violence will not be broken and the humanitarian needs will continue to grow.

Despite the close historical links between Uganda and Rwanda, the two countries have continued to disagree over their involvement in the ongoing conflict in the DRC. A major consequence of the disagreement is the creation of political obstacles to the repatriation of the Ugandan refugees in Rwanda.

The instability caused by the civil war in Sudan frequently spilled over the borders and into Uganda, and caused strained relations between the two countries with each accusing the other of supporting rebel groups fighting their respective governments - Uganda for supporting the Sudan Peoples Liberation Army (SPLA), while Sudan for backing the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA).

The governments of Rwanda and Burundi both face rebel groups operating from the DRC. The Burundi government has had to constantly fend off Hutu militias; the political developments in Burundi have a direct impact on the situation in Rwanda. This has motivated the Rwanda government to play an active role in supporting efforts towards the peace process in Burundi.

The East Africa region has also been heavily affected by terrorists’ attacks. Since the 9/11 attack in the USA the region has been on high alert and this has adversely affected the economies of the three countries, particularly Kenya which has suffered two attacks - the first in 1998 at the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi causing over 200 deaths, and the second in 2002 in which a tourist hotel in Mombasa was bombed. Air travel has been greatly affected in form of temporarily diversion of flights and increased and lengthy security procedures. Several embassies have periodically issued travel advisories for their nationals to reconsider making non-essential travel into the region.

For further information please contact:

The Federation Secretariat, Africa Department: Josse Gillijns, Regional Officer for Eastern Africa, Email josse.gillijns@ifrc.org, Phone 41.22.730.42.24.

Footnote:

1 USD 1,953,800 or EUR 1,584,400.

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