Kenya

Appeal for Kakuma Refugee Assistance Program

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


Kakuma Refugee Assistance Program AFKE83
Appeal Target : US$ 2,814,206

Request from ACT Network : US$ 399,206

Geneva, April 27, 1998

Dear Colleagues,

The ongoing civil war in southern Sudan has over the years resulted in mass exodus of southern Sudanese people into neighboring countries. Following an influx of around 30,000 asylum seekers into northern Kenya in 1992, the Government of Kenya (GoK) provided a site in Kakuma, north-west Kenya, to house the refugees.

A large majority of the 55,000 refugees currently in Kakuma camp, are of Sudanese origin. Others include Somalis, Ethiopians, Ugandans, Congolese, Rwandese and Burundese.

Under a tripartite agreement with the UNHCR and GoK, the Lutheran World Federation / Department of World Service (LWF/DWS) has been responsible for camp management which includes distribution of food and non-food items, maintenance and operation of water systems, sanitation, shelter construction, education, social services, counseling, construction and maintenance of camp infrastructure and camp security coordination.

LWF/DWS also provides transport and other assistance to other ACT members operating in the camp - the New Sudan Council of Churches, Church of the Province of Kenya, the Presbyterian Church and others.

It is extremely unlikely that conditions of civil war and instability in Sudan and Somalia will improve in the short term. The camp was started in 1992 and seems likely to continue through 1998 and beyond.

ACT is a worldwide network of churches and related agencies meeting human need through coordinated emergency response.

The ACT Coordinating Office is based with the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) in Switzerland.

Under the tripartite agreement, of the total US $ 2.8 million required for Kakuma camp in 1998, UNHCR will provide LWF/DWS with US $ 1.8 million (64 %) of the total budget. In addition, Lutheran World Relief - USA has secured US $ 615,000 from the US State Department Bureau for Population, Refugees and Migration.

The balance of around US $ 400,000 is being sought from the ACT Network.

This will enable ACT-LWF/DWS to meet the basic life sustaining needs of the refugees who are unable to return to their pre-emergency homes and lives.

Thank you for your support.

Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

For further information, please contact:

ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (phone 41 22 791 6032 or mobile phone ++ 41 89 203 6055)
or
ACT Appeals Officer, Neville Pradhan (phone +41 22 791 6035)

ACT Web Site address: http://www.wcc-coe.org/act/

Rev. Myra Blyth
Director
WCC/Unit IV
LWF/World Service
Miriam Lutz
ACT Co-ordinator
Rev. Rudolf Hinz
Director
I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER INFORMATION

A. Lutheran World Federation/Department of World Service, Nairobi, Kenya
Contact: Mr Jim Mason, Programme Co-ordinator
Tel: (254-2) 56 09 63/56 46 59
Fax: (254-2) 56 50 41
e-mail: lwfnairobi@maf.org

B. LWF/DWS Nairobi office has been undertaking emergency operations in the East African region since 1973. Logistics support has been provided for relief and rehabilitation programs in southern Sudan, Somalia, Rwanda and Zaire. The Nairobi office has also given assistance to LWF/DWS development programs in Ethiopia, Uganda and Tanzania.

II. IMPLEMENTING ACT MEMBER and PARTNER INFORMATION

LWF/DWS Nairobi as above.

III. DESCRIPTION of the EMERGENCY SITUATION

Type of emergency - human made: In July 1992, southern Sudanese refugees fleeing the ongoing civil war between the Government of Sudan and the Sudanese Peoples’ Liberation Army sought asylum in Kenya. An influx of about 30,000 asylum seekers crossed into northern Kenya at Lokchokio. A permanent site at Kakuma was provided by the Government of Kenya (GoK) further away from the border in Turkana district of north-west Kenya.

The current camp population is about 55,000 and the big majority of these refugees are south Sudanese of several ethnic groups. The population profile has changed with the relocation of refugees of other nationalities as other refugee camps in Kenya are closed. Nationalities now include Somalis, Ethiopians, Ugandans, Congolese, Rwandese and Burundians.

Current phase of emergency - post crisis phase: ACT assistance is sought for basic life-sustaining needs of the refugees who are unable to return to their pre-emergency homes and lives.

Date of emergency - January to December 1998: It is extremely unlikely that conditions of civil war and instability in Sudan and Somalia will improve in the short term. The camp started in 1992 and seems likely to continue throughout 1998 and beyond.

Impact on human lives: All the refugees in Kakuma camp are totally reliant on relief agencies for supply of food, water, shelter, health, sanitation and other services. It is not possible for the refugees to practice agriculture or pastoralism -their usual livelihoods as land and water resources are inadequate and cannot sustain these activities. Of the 55,000 refugees in the camp, there is a high proportion of children and teenagers. There are about 8,000 unaccompanied minors included in the school population of 18,000 students.

Damage to property: Every year the camp continues to operate, there is a need to repair and maintain camp infrastructure. In 1998 resources are needed for building 2,000 new shelters and 500 new latrines as well as maintenance of 22 schools, 20 kilometres of water pipes and roads along with numerous camp buildings and community structures.

Location of emergency and of proposed response - Kakuma, Kenya in Turkana district of north-west Kenya, some 100 kilometres south of the Sudan border and 900 kilometres by road from Nairobi. It is a hot and dry area of shrub and sand with low and unpredictable annual rainfall. Other agencies are collaborating with LWF/DWS in the operation of Kakuma refugee camp. UNHCR provides much of the funding for NGO programs in the camp and monitors NGO expenditures. Other partners include the WFP which is responsible for the provision and storage of food commodities and the IRC which is in charge of the medical sector and some self-help activities.

LWF/DWS works in partnership with Don Bosco Vocational Training who have seconded staff from Jesuit Refugee Services to assist in social services. The National Council of Churches of Kenya and the Kenya Girl Guides also combine with LWF/DWS to promote their activities in the camp.

Statistics: There is general agreement between LWF/DWS, GoK and UNHCR on camp population figures. A camp census was conducted by UNHCR in August 1997 with participation by GoK and LWF/DWS staff. Arrivals and departures from the camp are registered by UNHCR.

Current security situation: Bandit attacks are an irregular feature of road travel in Turkana district. It is therefore advisable to travel in convoy when journeying from Kakuma to Nairobi.

In the camp, LWF/DWS works with GoK police to ensure security. Robbery and fighting are the most common offences in the camp, with an occasional gun or hand grenade attack. However, report of refugees assaulting staff are infrequent and NGO staff do not usually work under any physical threat.

IV. GOAL and OBJECTIVES

A. Project goal: To preserve and sustain life and reduce suffering of refugees at Kakuma camp, while concurrently fostering preparation for their future lives.

B. Project objectives:

  • Orderly distribution of food and non-food items to the camp population.
  • Capacity-building for greater refugee participation in the planning and implementation of camp programs.
  • Support for community social activities and projects.
  • Provision of essential camp infrastructure - shelters, water supply, sanitation, flood and environmental protection, road-works and construction of community buildings.
  • Developing an appropriate environment for youth, unaccompanied minors and others and preparation for eventual repatriation.
  • Effective operation of the education sector - secondary, primary and pre-schools.
  • Promotion of peace education, conflict resolution and development of social and vocational skills.
  • Improvement and enhancement of social and cultural ties amongst the various nationalities and ethnic groupings.
  • Developing a co-ordinated approach to the provision of assistance to the target population with UNHCR, GoK and other partners.

V. BENEFICIARIES

A. Number & Type of Targeted Beneficiaries:

Some 55,000 refugees at Kakuma camp will benefit from the implementation of LWF/DWS Refugee Assistance Program. Of the 55,000 people in the camp, around 35,000 are from southern Sudan, some 10,000 are Somalis, and the remainder come from Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Democratic Republic of Congo.

Much less than half of the camp population is female - only 38% of the refugees are women or girls. There is a disproportionately high number of male youths in the camp. As many as 8,000 unaccompanied boys settled in the camp when it opened in 1992. Currently, around 5,000 boys and a further 3,000 vulnerable minors require special psycho-social assistance.

B. Selection Criteria:

The targeted refugees and families are especially vulnerable because they have lost their homes, livelihoods and citizen rights. At Kakuma camp, assistance is given to all refugees registered by UNHCR.

C. Number of Beneficiaries by Type of Relief:

All the refugees are entitled to receive food, water, firewood, shelter, sanitation, health and social services. Some special services are available to vulnerable groups within the refugee community. Girl children are encouraged to attend school, and LWF/DWS Social Services Department conducts special programs for women. Activities are also undertaken with the disabled.

VI. PROPOSED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE and IMPLEMENTATION

The proposed relief measures can be categorised as life sustaining, i.e. required to provide basic life needs.

Houses to be constructed/repaired - this year there is a need to repair as many as 4,000 shelters that have deteriorated or been destroyed by extremes of weather or by fire or flood. For new arrivals there will be a need to build around 2,000 new shelters.

Water - the maintenance and expansion of the camp water supply requires skilled personnel to ensure that each refugee receives 22 litres of clean water per day.

Sanitation - to maintain camp hygiene standards and reduce the risk of disease it is proposed to build 500 new latrines and 1,200 latrine superstructures during 1998. This will require purchase of cement, sand, wood poles and palm leaves- for roofing.

Community infrastructure - the LWF/DWS office in the camp needs to be extended to allow for accommodation of three sector heads currently without dedicated office space. With about 1,500 students undertaking secondary school studies there is urgent need to enlarge the main library in the camp. The increasing range of LWF/DWS social service programs and activities requires construction of two new social service centres.

Community services - a program of special services for women addresses their special needs and mobilises women into groups for various production and capacity building activities. The Community Development program also focuses on capacity building and income generation for such vulnerable groups as the disabled, the aged and youth. The Social Services department also focuses on the cultural, recreational and sports needs of the refugee community.

VII. PROJECT MANAGEMENT, ADMINISTRATION and MONITORING

Management and administration: LWF/DWS senior management including the Program Coordinator and Camp Manager liaise closely with UNHCR and other operational agencies in planning and designing the overall program. The Program Coordinator will provide ACT Geneva with narrative, statistical, financial and audit reports as specified in the Reporting Guidelines.

Monitoring: Project assessment is undertaken with regular monitoring and evaluation by UNHCR together with scheduled reporting as stipulated in the project agreement between LWF/DWS and UNHCR. LWF/DWS however operates an independent monitoring and evaluation system to cross-check the effectiveness of the program and control the use of project resources.

Financial management and controls: Funds will be disbursed and expenditures monitored by LWF/DWS Accounts Departments in Nairobi.

Personnel required: Some 280 Kenyan staff (plus 1,000 refugee workers) are required in Kakuma to implement the LWF/DWS program of assistance for the 55,000 refugees in the camp. Another 10 LWF/DWS staff in Nairobi provide logistic, program and budget/finance support.

Project administration and support: A large office in Kakuma camp and a smaller office in Nairobi provide the administrative support for the LWF/DWS Refugee Assistance Program. Some 17 light vehicles in Kakuma and Nairobi and four trucks and two tractors in Kakuma enable the LWF/DWS staff to provide services to the refugees in the camp.

Transportation requirements: There is need to purchase another 14 MT truck and one pick-up to help transport firewood and supplementary food (fruits and vegetables) for the refugees. In addition, LWF/DWS charters flights from Nairobi to Kakuma on a fort-nightly basis for carriage of staff and essential supplies.

Procurement of vehicles and other capital equipment: This can be done in Nairobi by the LWF/DWS Logistics and Liaison office. The main function of the office is to provide support for Kakuma camp. As per ACT procurement guidelines, all purchases of equipment worth more than $5000 will need three price quotations.

Implementation: LWF/DWS employs an expatriate camp manager to lead a team of 10 Kenyan coordinators for the different sectors of camp activities. In turn, the coordinators are assisted by the 280 Kenyan staff members and by 1000 refugee workers.

VIII. IMPLEMENTATION TIMETABLE

Assessment, start-up, implementation, close-out, transition: Project start date is 1 January 1998 with implementation throughout the year and close-out by 31 December 1998.

IX. COORDINATION

Co-ordination with other ACT members: The Church of the Province of Kenya (Anglican), Presbyterian and other churches operate in the refugee camp, but are not active in relief work. From time to time, LWF/DWS supports the ACT member churches including the New Sudan Council of Churches, with transport and other assistance.

Established co-ordination mechanisms: LWF/DWS annually renews a tripartite agreement with UNHCR and the Government of Kenya to manage the camp. Regular coordination meetings are held in the camp and in Nairobi with staff from LWF/DWS, UNHCR and partner NGOs.

Co-ordination with government: The GoK provides safe asylum for refugees by giving security support for camp operations. A District Officer and a police post are stationed in the camp.

X. GENERAL

Normal life-sustaining activities of agriculture and pastoralism are not possible for the refugee population as such activities would lead to competition for use of scarce natural resources of water and grazing land with the local Turkana people.

LWF/DWS focuses on education (including conflict resolution, peace education, environmental awareness, homeland education and gender sensitivity) and social services (sports, drama, small enterprises, women’s programs, etc.) to give refugees alternative activities. Such programs can reduce tension in the camp and minimize violence within and among communities of various ethnic groups.

XI. APPEAL BUDGET

ANTICIPATED APPEAL INCOME
Total USD
ACT MEMBERS
LWR/US State Department Bureau for Population, Refugees & Migration
615,000
Request to ACT Network
399,206
OTHER DONORS (confirmed)
UNHCR
1,800,000
Total Appeal & Estimated Income from all Sources
2,814,206
BUDGET
(ACT Network Funds)

Category / Description
Type Unit
No. Units
Unit Cost Ksh
Total Cost Ksh
Total USD
POST CRISIS ASSISTANCE
Water and Sanitation
Water - plumber
each
1
366,000
366,000
6,000
Sanitation
latrine
1,500
1,220
1,830,000
30,000
Sub Total:
2,196,000
36,000
Community Services
Women’s service
each
1
1,314,000
1,314,000
21,541
Supplies
each
15
43,067
646,000
10,590
Salaries
each
404
3,626
1,464,904
24,015
Social centres
each
2
250,000
500,000
8,197
Culture activities
each
4
568,750
2,275,000
37,295
Sub Total:
6,199,909
101,638
Shelter and Infrastructure
Huts
each
300
2,625
787,500
12,910
Office extensions
each
1
1,265,000
1,265,000
20,738
Library
each
1
1,100,000
1,100,000
18,033
Salaries
each
6
245,296
1,471,774
24,127
Sub Total:
4,624,276
75,808
Capital Equipment
Truck
each
1
3,416,000
3,416,000
56,000
Pick-up
each
1
2,318,000
2,318,000
38,000
Generator
each
1
165,000
165,000
2,705
Computers
each
2
162,500
325,000
5,328
VHF radios
each
4
40,714
162,856
2,670
Sub Total:
6,386,856
104,703
Personnel, Admin., Operational Costs
Support staff salaries
person
6
412,421
2,474,526
40,566
Staff travel
flights
26
95,000
2,470,000
40,492
Sub Total:
4,944,526
81,058
Total Request To ACT Network:
24,351,567
399,206
Exchange rate: 1 USD = Ksh 61.00
APPEAL FACT SHEET

Appeal Number: AFKE83

Appeal Name: Kakuma Refugee Assistance Program

Date Issued: 22.04.98

Project Completion Date: 31.12.98

Project Description: Kakuma Refugee camp in north-western Kenya has been home to several thousand refugees since 1992. The camp currently houses 55,000 refugees most of whom are of south Sudanese origin. Somalis numbering around 10,000 are the second largest group, while the rest are made up of Ethiopians, Ugandans, Congolese, Rwandese and Burundians. All these refugees have fled their homes due to civil conflicts.

Under a tripartite agreement with the UNHCR and GoK, ACT- Lutheran World Federation / Department of World Service (LWF/DWS) has been responsible for camp management which includes distribution of food and non-food items, maintenance and operation of water systems, sanitation, shelter construction, education, social service, counselling, construction and maintenance of camp infrastructure and camp security coordination.

Implementing Partner
Activity Description

Appeal Target (USD)
LWF/DWS
Distribution of food & non-food items.Water, health, sanitation,infrastructure,etc.
399,206
TOTAL APPEAL TARGET: 2,814,206

Pledges can be communicated to ACT by using the Appeal Pledge Form

ACT - Action by Churches Together
Account Number: 102539/0.01.61
Banque Edouard Constant
Cours de Rive 11
Case postale 3754
1211 Genève 3
SWITZERLAND

APPEAL PLEDGE FORM

(Please fax to the ACT Co-ordinating Office - Fax:++41 22 791 6506)

Appeal Name: Kakuma Refugee Assistance Program
Appeal Number: AFKE83

Appeal Target: US$ 399,206
Project Completion Date: 31 Dec. 1998

Contributing organization: ........................................
Telephone number:..............................

Contact person: ..........................................

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Signature
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3. Applications to back donors - Governments, ECHO, etc:

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Implementing
Appeal
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