UNHCR Jordan Factsheet: Zaatari Camp (July 2018)

Report
from UN High Commissioner for Refugees
Published on 10 Jul 2018 View Original

Zaatari is home to 78,552 refugees, nearly 20% are under five years old.

20% of households are female headed.

Average of 80 births per week, and 14,000 weekly consultations.

Total of 5,074 refugees engaged in cash for work inside the camp 21,400 children are enrolled in 31 schools, with 58 community centres offering activities.

10,000 refugees have work permits. 12% are women

UNHCR PRESENCE

Staff:

51 National Staff
7 International Staff

Zaatari Camp, close to Jordan’s northern border with Syria has become emblematic of the displacement of Syrians across the Middle East following its establishment in 2012. In that time, the camp’s evolution, from a small collection of tents into an urban settlement of some 80,000 persons reflects both the needs and aspirations of the camp’s residents and a transition to a more predictable, cost effective and participatory platform for the delivery of assistance. This includes a household level electricity distribution network powered by a Solar PV plant which has been recently inaugurated. The Camp’s informal market, reflecting the vibrant trade relationship between the peoples of northern Jordan and southern Syria, comprises of approximately 3,000 informal shops and businesses.

Working with Partners

4 Governmental partners: The Syrian Refugee Affairs Directorate (SRAD), the Ministry of Public Works and Housing (MPWH), the Ministry of Health (MoH) and the Ministry of Education (MoE). 42 Humanitarian partners: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development (ACTED), Arab Renaissance for Democracy and Development-Legal Aid, The Eastern Mediterranean Public Health Network (EMPHNET), The UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), Fin Church Aid (FCA), Humanity and Inclusion (HI), Holy Land, International Labour Organization (ILO), International Committee of the Red Crescent (ICRC), International Medical Corps (IMC), International Organization for Migration (IOM), International Rescue Committee (IRC), International Relief and Development (IRD), Japan Emergency NGO (JEN), Jordan Humanitarian Aid Society (JHAS), Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Jordan Training and Development (JTD), Kokyyo naki Kodomotachi (Children without Borders KNK), Kenan Refugee Project (KRP), Lutheran World Federation (LWF), Mercy Corps, Medecins du Monde (MDM), Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF), Noor al Hussein Foundation (NHF), Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), OXFAM, Questscope, Sheikh Thani bin Abdullah Foundation for Humanitarian Services (RAF), Relief International, REACH, Save the Children, Syrian American Medical Society Foundation (SAMS), Syria Needs Analysis Project (SNAP), Saudi National Campaign (SNC),United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UK Policing Support Team, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), UNOPS, UNWOMEN, World Food Programme (WFP), War Child and World Vision (WV).