Iraq + 1 more

UNICEF Iraq Monthly Humanitarian Situation Report, June 2017

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

  • UNICEF released ‘Nowhere to Go’, an advocacy report examining how three years of violence have negatively impacted Iraq’s children. The report calls for greater protection of children and direct investment in their futures.

  • More than one million people have been newly-displaced since military operations to retake Mosul city began in October 2016, with around threequarters of those displaced from West Mosul since April. While 1.95 million people countrywide have returned to their governorates of origin, there still remain 3.3 million people displaced and in need of humanitarian assistance. (IOM, Displacement Tracking Matrix, 30 June 2017)

  • Since 17 October 2016, UNICEF has supported delivery of multi-sector emergency response reaching 1,192,632 individuals (202,796 families, around 655,948 children) in re-taken communities in northern Ninewa.

  • In 2017, the RRM Consortium co- led by UNICEF and WFP has reached 1,762,733 vulnerable people on the move, including 863,739 children.

  • Large-scale WASH support continues across the country. In June, UNICEF trucked 4 million litres of safe water daily to East and West Mosul, serving 570,000 people. In camps across the country, UNICEF is supporting 170,000 displaced people with 5.3 million litres of water every day.

  • UNICEF partners reached 212,717 children (100,035 girls) with psychosocial support services, and 16,422 children (7,293 girls) accessed specialised services.

  • This Sitrep summarizes the results during the first six months of 2017

SITUATION IN NUMBERS

June 2017

5.1 million children in need out of 11 million people affected (OCHA, HRP 2017)

3.35 million internally displaced people (IDP)

1.95 million people returned to newlyaccessible areas (IOM, Displacement Tracking Matrix, 30 June 2017)

Target population in 2017:

Rapid Response: 1.3 million IDPs
WASH: 1 million people
Education: 690,000 children
Health: 5.7 million children (polio)
Child Protection: 161,500 children

UNICEF Appeal 2017

US$ 161.4 million

Funding Status* US $ 100.28 million

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

More than one million people have been newly-displaced since military operations to retake Mosul city began in October 2016, with around three-quarters of those displaced in the past three months from West Mosul specifically. While 1.95 million people countrywide have returned to their governorates of origin so far, there still remain 3.3 million people displaced and in need of humanitarian assistance. Despite expectations that Government of Iraq forces will soon retake full control of Mosul city, humanitarian actors still anticipate a need for urgent assistance in Mosul but also elsewhere, as military action continues in western Anbar, Hawiga (Kirkuk) and Tel Afar (Ninewa). With significant underfunding of the UN’s Humanitarian Response Plan 2017 partners report interventions at risk of suspension or closure particularly in Anbar and Salah Al Din. WASH, Education, RRM and Child Protection face critical funding gaps that could result in closure or scale down of projects. Iraq continues to be characterised as a protection crisis. The incidences of civilian casualties from drone attacks, air strikes, and sniper fire are high, as well as multiple reports of civilians used as human shields by parties to the conflict. Children likewise remain exposed to the same risks, as well as being particularly vulnerable to injury or death due to unexploded ordnance (UXO) and separation from relatives or caregivers. Girls and women are vulnerable to sexual or gender-based violence, and boys and men are subject to detention for unspecified periods of security screening, in some cases without access to basic services. Protection concerns are likely to continue as people are forced to return to unsafe areas, or face retaliation, particularly for those perceived to be affiliated with, or sympathetic to, the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) group. In the absence of strong civilian governance there is a risk that unrest in newly retaken areas, or uncertainty over previously disputed territories, could fuel future conflict.