Iraq: Mosul Humanitarian Response Situation Report No. 35 (22 May to 28 May 2017) [EN/AR/KU]

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 28 May 2017
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This report is produced by OCHA Iraq in collaboration with humanitarian partners. This document is subject to availability of data at the time of circulation. Also, and as the context rapidly evolves, information in this report is subject to constant change, with figures and locations which may no longer be current at the time of issuance/reading. The next report will be issued on or around 5 June 2017.

Highlights

  • Throughout the week, displacement continued from the western side of Mosul city.
    According to the government’s Ministry of Migration and Displaced (MoMD), since the start of the western Mosul operation on 19 February 2017, a total of 597,876 people have fled western Mosul city as of 28 May.

  • Since the Mosul operation began on 17 October 2016, cumulatively, 774,026 people have been displaced from Mosul city as of 28 May.

  • As military operations began to concentrate on Mosul's old city area and nearby neighbourhoods on 26 and 27 May, government officials strongly requested that civilians flee these areas along ‘safe passages’. Concerns remain for the protection of civilians in ISILcontrolled areas of western Mosul: some 180,000 people are estimated to still be living in the old city area and the neighbourhoods immediately north of the old city.

2,959,000 People reached, in and out of camps, with emergency response packages of food, water and hygiene items (since 17 October 2016)

1,355,000 People reached with out-of-camp WASH support (since 17 October 2016)

994,000 People received medical consultations (since 17 October 2016)

801,000 People reached with NFI kits (since 17 October 2016)

774,000 People displaced, cumulatively, from Mosul city as of 28 May 2017 (source: Government of Iraq, MoMD)

8,358 Fully-serviced family plots readily available at 19 camps and emergency sites (as of 28 May 2017)

Situation Overview

People have been displaced from western Mosul city throughout the week - according to MoMD, an average of approximately 6,000 people per day have passed through Hammam al Alil screening site, south of Mosul city.

Since the start of the western Mosul operation on 19 February 2017, a total of 597,876 people have fled western Mosul city as of 28 May – some 46,643 people have fled over the past week. Since the Mosul operation began on 17 October 2016, cumulatively, 774,026 people have been displaced from the city as of 28 May. According to the government, 176,395 people, cumulatively, had returned to both eastern and western Mosul as of 28 May.

As military operations began to concentrate on Mosul's old city area and nearby neighbourhoods on 26 and 27 May, government officials strongly urged civilians to immediately leave ISIL-controlled areas and cross the frontline along established ‘safe passages’. As of 28 May, there are a total of nine assembly areas, mustering points and screening sites along these displacement routes in Mosul city: seven sites are on the western side of the Tigris River, at alNajjar (assembly point), Thawra (mustering point), Mosul Railway Station (assembly area), Mosul Airport (mustering point), Scorpion Junction (screening site), Abu Saif (screening site) and the Hammam al Alil (screening site), while two sites are on the east side of the river, at the Mosul Woods (mustering point and screening site) and the Fifth Bridge (mustering point and screening site). The two sites in eastern Mosul city have been established following the establishment of a new displacement route utilising a floating bridge built by the Iraqi Security Forces north of Mosul's Old City area last week. The new floating bridge re-connects western and eastern Mosul and, aside from its military use, is being used to facilitate the transportation of displaced civilians out of conflict areas.

Humanitarian partners continue to respond to the outflow of people: immediate emergency assistance continues to be provided at assembly areas, mustering points and screening sites, including ready-to-eat meals, water, sanitation facilities, medical services and shading. In addition, and wherever possible, efforts continue to be made to undertake assessment missions to newly accessible areas close to the front lines, followed by emergency assistance distribution. Wherever conditions and access allow, humanitarians also aim to reach those who stayed in their homes, and those who are returning to newly accessible areas.

Humanitarian and protection needs continue to remain severe, both among displaced families and vulnerable residents of newly re-taken and accessible areas. People continue to flee under difficult and often dangerous circumstances, which are exacerbated by high temperatures. Specifically, concerns remain for the protection of civilians in ISIL-controlled areas of western Mosul, where food insecurity, lack of safe drinking water and medicines have been reported - some 180,000 people are estimated to still be living in the old city area and the neighbourhoods immediately north of the old city.

Camp construction and site expansion continues to ensure enough capacity exists to accommodate newly displaced people. On 23 May, a new camp, As-Salamiyah 1, was opened in the Hamdaniya/Nimrud District, 30 km south of Mosul city, on the eastern bank of the Tigris River – the camp has a capacity for approximately 11,000 individuals.

As of 25 May, Zelikan, in Ninewa Governorate, is the latest emergency site to be completed - the site will have an initial capacity to accommodate some 4,300 families. In addition, the first tents are being pitched at As-Salamiyah 2, a camp adjacent to As-Salamiyah 1, where there will be eventual total camp capacity to accommodate up to 30,000 people. According to the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) Cluster as of 28 May, 8,358 fullyserviced family plots were available for immediate use at 19 different sites. Some 318,745 people are being sheltered in 27 camps and emergency sites in both Mosul and Hawija, with the remainder in host communities and informal sites.
As shortages of clean drinking water remain a significant humanitarian concern in Mosul city, WASH cluster partners have increased the daily provision of water from 4.5 million litres per day to 6.4 million litres per day over the past two weeks. Daily, some 2.78 million litres are now trucked and delivered to western Mosul city, while some 3.62 million litres are being tankered to eastern Mosul city.

The rate of trauma injuries remains a significant humanitarian concern, with referrals increasing by 1.6 per cent over the past two weeks. Between 17 October 2016 and 21 May 2017, 12,714 people were transferred to hospitals for emergency medical treatment, of which 6,581 people from western Mosul alone since 19 February 2017. Since the start of the West Mosul operation in February 2017, as of 19 May some 2,757 people were treated at Trauma Stabilisation Points (TSPs) near the frontline areas of western Mosul.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

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