Iraq: Mosul Humanitarian Response Situation Report No. 16 (9 January - 15 January 2017) [EN/AR/KU]

Report
from UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
Published on 15 Jan 2017

Highlights

• More than 148,000 people are currently displaced as a result of conflict in Mosul city that began on 17 October 2017, an increase of nearly 12,500 people in the last week. Some 16,500 returnees and hundreds of thousands of highly vulnerable residents in newly-accessible areas continue to require humanitarian assistance.

• Trauma causality rates remain high near frontline areas, with many trauma cases requiring referral from eastern Mosul city to Erbil city. From 17 October 2016 to 11 January 2017, over 1,500 wounded civilians have been sent to Erbil’s main hospitals to receive trauma care.

• Major efforts have been made to improve trauma care. A new 50-bed type II field surgical hospital was opened last week in Bartalah. Since it opened on 8 January, this field hospital has treated over 45 patients for trauma injuries within its first 96 hours of operation.

• This week multi-sectoral distributions by humanitarian partners in eastern Mosul city reached 69,000 people with ready-to-eat food, water and hygiene items.

Situation Overview

Humanitarian partners are increasingly able to access more affected people in eastern Mosul city, as Iraqi Security Forces secure greater control over neighbourhoods in this area. From 9 to 15 January, partners of WFP and UNICEF undertook multi-sector distributions in eastern Mosul city's newly accessible neighbourhoods. These distributions, which reached approximately 69,000 people in total, included ready-to-eat food rations, water supplies and hygiene materials.

Between 9 January and 15 January, approximately 12,500 people were newly displaced, bringing the total number of people currently displaced by the Mosul crisis to just over 148,000 people. Newly displaced people are primarily moving from the neighbourhoods of eastern Mosul city to emergency sites and camps run by government and humanitarian partners, predominantly to the south and east, where they are provided further humanitarian assistance. People are also seeking shelter with friends and family members in neighbourhoods further east of frontline areas, such as Gogachly. Although now secured, many neighbourhoods are littered with building rubble and solid domestic waste. According to reports from people who have been displaced from eastern Mosul city, some people are waiting for this rubble and waste to be cleared and for basic services to be restored before they will return to their neighbourhood.

The Government has begun delivering food through the public distribution system. Coverage of people in need remains low in immediate frontline neighbourhoods where most immediate food needs are seen. Humanitarian agencies continue to augment this mechanism wherever possible. Markets are now functioning in many of the newly accessible areas of eastern Mosul city. Water supplies remain inadequate, however. According to local authorities, some 70 per cent of the water network in eastern Mosul city is functioning, but this network is only working sporadically and only in some neighbourhoods. Water delivery will only become reliable and sustainable once the distribution network becomes fully operational. The repair of damaged pipes in eastern Mosul city has begun, but some of the water treatment and pumping stations servicing this area remain under ISIL control.

Trauma causality rates remain high near frontline areas. Major efforts have been made to improve trauma care. In recent weeks, trauma stabilization points near frontline areas have been reinforced and a new 50-bed level II field surgical hospital was opened last week in Bartalah. Since it opened on 8 January, this field hospital treated over 45 patients for war-related trauma injuries within its first 96 hours of operation. The close proximity of this field hospital to eastern Mosul city, some 8 kms east of Gogachly, has meant people are receiving triage and surgery significantly sooner during a very time critical period. Many trauma cases still require referral to Erbil city however.

From 17 October 2016 to 11 January 2017, over 1,500 wounded civilians have been sent to Erbil’s main hospitals to receive trauma care.

There is no humanitarian access to ISIL controlled areas of western Mosul city and the corridor to Tal Afar and there are increasing humanitarian concerns for the wellbeing of civilians in these areas, where more than 750,000 civilians are thought to be living. For more than two months, major commercial supply routes have been cut. Key informants report that food prices are skyrocketing and there are credible indications that water and electricity supplies are intermittent. Shortages of basic and specialized medicines are also being reported. Humanitarian partners are preparing for different possible scenarios when fighting begins in the western sections of the city. The protection of civilians remains of critical importance, and all parties to the conflict have an obligation to ensure as few civilians are affected by the conflict as possible.

From 17 October to 10 January 2017, the Ministry of Migration and Displacement (MoMD) has delivered dry food rations to 157,600 families, and ready-to-eat food rations to 105,000 families. Some 31,200 tents have also been distributed to shelter displaced people. In addition, MoMD has distributed 65,400 health kits, 48,000 kitchen sets and 123,000 blankets.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs:

To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit http://unocha.org/.