U.S. Pacific Command donates hospital equipment to Indonesia

Report
from US Department of State
Published on 20 Jan 2006
Donation first major exchange since lifting of embargo on military aid

The U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) has donated $11 million worth of hospital equipment to Indonesia to set up a full-scale military hospital that will increase the disaster relief capability of the Indonesian military following the December 2004 tsunami, the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta announced in a January 20 press release.

The aid is the first major military exchange since the United States lifted its embargo on military assistance for Indonesia in November 2005, the release says. Such assistance had been restricted due to insufficient cooperation from the Indonesian military in investigating the August 2002 murders of two American citizens in Papua province.

"This is the largest donation known in Pacific Command," U.S. Ambassador to Indonesia Lynn Pascoe said in the press release. "It symbolizes the long-standing friendship and growing military cooperation between our two nations."

According to PACOM spokesman Lieutenant Commander Jason Salata of the U.S. Navy, the donation of the hospital equipment will enable the continuation of the care delivered by the Navy hospital ship Mercy since the December 2004 tsunami, while increasing the disaster relief capability of the Indonesian military.

Following is the text of the press release:

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The United States Donates 'Fleet Hospital' to Indonesia

U.S. EMBASSY JAKARTA
PRESS RELEASE
PUBLIC AFFAIRS SECTION
January 20, 2006

In the first major military exchange since the lifting of the embargo, hospital equipment valued at US$11 million, donated by the U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM), was turned over to the Government of Indonesia in a formal ceremony today at the Ministry of Defense.

Ambassador Lynn Pascoe was joined by PACOM's Director for Logistics Support Brig. Gen. Kenneth Dowd, U.S. Army, to present the contents of a full-scale Navy Fleet Hospital to Minister of Defense Juwono and TNI Commander-in-Chief General Sutarto. The 106 containers are filled with enough medical equipment to set up a full-scale U.S. military hospital complete with operating rooms, laboratories, intensive care beds, x-rays, a dental surgery unit, and refrigerated blood banks.

"This is the largest donation known in Pacific Command," said Ambassador Pascoe. "It symbolizes the long-standing friendship and growing military cooperation between our two nations. The United States values its partnership with Indonesia and appreciates the vital role the nation plays in the security, stability and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region."

The Fleet Hospital donation is a result of discussions between PACOM Surgeon General Rear Adm. Robert Hufstader and TNI Surgeon General Brig. Gen. Dr. Achmad Hiyadat as that took place while the U.S. military worked with the Indonesian military to deliver humanitarian assistance following the December 2004 tsunami, according to PACOM Spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Jason Salata, U.S. Navy. He said that the donation of the Fleet Hospital will continue the care delivered by the USNS Mercy while increasing the disaster relief capability of the Indonesian military.

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(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)