Indonesia

Indonesia El Niño Drought Crisis

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


El Niño Drought Crisis ASID81
ACT Network Appeal Target: US$ 367,057
Indonesia’s recent history has been troubled by a combination of drought caused by El Niño, forest fires, ethnic strife and a political and monetary crisis which has left the average Indonesian anxious about the immediate future and struggling to cope in a crippled present.

A report from the World Food Program (WFP) states that the food supply situation in Indonesia has deteriorated since their last assessment in March, due to the prolonged effects of the El Niño drought and the intensification of the financial and economic crisis. As a result, the household food security of an ever larger portion of the population is being threatened. The World Bank has estimated that up to 50 million people will face problems in maintaining an acceptable caloric intake in the coming months.

The churches of Indonesia, under the leadership of the Communion of Churches of Indonesia (CCI), are preparing to launch a national campaign to address some of the effects of the drought, forest fires, and the monetary crisis. As one part of this effort, CCI and the Synod of East Kalimantan will be utilizing a $10,000 grant from the New Zealand government to provide food and seeds to 6 villages in the southern part of East Kalimantan.

In addition, in coordination with CCI, the global Protestant and Orthodox emergency response network (ACT International) is stepping in to assist with an Appeal to meet needs resulting from drought caused by El Niño in West Timor and Sulawesi.

Church World Service, in coordination with CCI, plans to assist central Sulawesi with food aid from USAID. This will consist of a comprehensive program of:

  • food for Work targeting the most severely drought-affected villages by increasing food availability through importation of rice until the next harvest;
  • ensuring that children under 5 and lactating mothers do not fall into a state of malnourishment; and
  • strengthening of infrastructures.

The Synod of West Timor, through its development NGO Alfa Omega, is already addressing the impact of drought in 3 districts with a grant from AusAID and is appealing to ACT for food and seed assistance to 2 more districts. Assistance has so far been coordinated with the government, as well as other NGOs including Catholic Relief Services.

Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

For further information, please contact:

ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (Phone 41-22-791 60 32 or mobile phone ++41-89 203 60 55)
or
ACT Appeals Officer, Neville Pradhan (Phone 41-22-791 60 35).

ACT Web Site address: http://www.act-intl.org/act/

Miriam Lutz
ACT Co-ordinator

I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBERS

Church World Service/Communion of Churches of Indonesia (ACT/CWS/CCI)

Alfa Omega Foundation for Community Service (ACT/YAO)

II. IMPLEMENTING ACT MEMBER AND PARTNER INFORMATION

Church World Service (CWS) is a global relief, development and refugee assistance organization with 34 Protestant and Orthodox member communions and an annual budget of over $42 million. CWS implements programs throughout the world in sectors which include micro-enterprise development, disaster and emergency relief, food production and agriculture, and health. CWS and its local partners implement humanitarian assistance programs solely on the basis of need with no sectarian bias. CWS looks forward to the opportunity to bring critical food aid relief to the people of Sulawesi who are suffering from the serious drought and economic crisis. CWS has worked in Indonesia for more than two decades implementing hundreds of projects including several large USAID Title II and PL 480 programs.

Church World Service is a ministry of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA and has had a long partnership with the Communion of Churches of Indonesia. Beginning in the early 1960’s, Church World Service implemented a program of relief and development assistance throughout Indonesia. Throughout this time, CWS has worked in close partnership with the Communion of Churches of Indonesia-Sulsera (CCI). From 1991 through 1995, CWS was integrated into the Participation in Development Program (PARPEM) of the Communion of Churches of Indonesia. In designing this proposal, CWS has worked closely with the Communion of Churches of Indonesia-Sulsera staff and the Communion of Churches of Indonesia-Jakarta staff . Local church staff and congregants in selected villages will assist in the implementation of this initiative in order to ensure the participation of all segments of the community including women and youth.

Yayasan Alfa Omega (YAO) was formed on 1 March 1985 by Gereja Masehi Injili di Timor (Christian Evangelical Church of Timor - GMIT) with the aim of developing church members in diakonia service. The outreach of the service to the community is not limited by religion, ethnic group, race or status. The areas served by ACT/YAO coincide with the areas served by GMIT including Kupang Area, South Central Timor, North Central Timor, Belu and Alor. During 13 years of YAO service, a large number of trained community development motivators or cadres have spread throughout the service area including some other provinces in Eastern Indonesia.

These motivators or cadres have various skills according to the type of their training, such as Village Development Monitors, Heath Monitors, Soil Conservation, Participatory Rural Appraisal, Gender, Community Self-Help Development, Bamboo Skills, Basic Training, Small Business Management and Strategic Planning. Other than at the central institution, training is also carried out at the area level according to the needs of the community. In 12 areas of service, there are now 26 study centres, 9 candidate centres and 61 work groups. Activities developed by the groups are horticulture, animal husbandry, fishing, savings and loans, mixed farming, long term plants and other service activities. YAO also has experience in managing emergency response programs, such as the tidal wave disaster in Alor (1991), the tidal wave in Maumere (1992) and the landslide in Tunbaun (1997) by organising the community that has experienced the disaster, identifying the problems, looking for alternative solutions and assisting the community experiencing the disaster giving support and enthusiasm for life so that the emergency aid can be managed along with the follow-up aid. After the disaster a program can be planned for the post disaster situation.

III. DESCRIPTION of the EMERGENCY

Background and current drought situation - Sulawesi (ACT/CWS/CCI)

Indonesia is currently suffering the effects of a severe drought which is seriously affecting the food security of its vulnerable populations. Although drought is common in many areas of Indonesia, this year’s lack of rainfall is considered much more disruptive than previous years due to the El Niño weather phenomenon. The abnormal weather pattern had affected rainfall and land fertility. According to the World Bank, the drop in rainfall has been as high as 30% in many areas of Eastern Indonesia (Nusa Tenggara Timur and Nusa Tengarra Buarat) with smaller drops also accompanied by rain fall that is off normal seasonal cycles. In South Sulawesi the normal rainfall has dropped more than 50%, according to the FAO/WFP, from approximately 2,000 mm in 1995 to about 700 mm in 1997. Traditional November/December rains are falling as late as April/May, causing massive disruptions in planting cycles and crop yield.

The effect of two anomalous weather conditions caused by El Niño, drought and unseasonable rains, has caused the traditionally rice rich Province of South Sulawesi to suffer a drop in crop output in both the most fertile and less fertile districts. According to the March 1998 World Bank Report, the 1997 rice crop in Indonesia was smaller than 1996. In South Sulawesi there was a 4% drop in total paddy yield in 1997 and a predicted additional 5% drop for 1998.

The Indonesia Central Bureau of Statistics announced that Indonesia’s un-husked rice output dropped by 3.62 percent from 51.1 million in 1996 to 49.25 million tons in 1997, and total area under cultivation in Indonesia was reduced by 4.3% from 11.57 million to 11.07 million.

Based on CWS assessment information and Government of Indonesia (GoI) Ministry of Agriculture estimates 10.2% of paddy area planted in South Sulawesi was completely ruined and an additional 4% has far lower yield in 1997. The limited rains that have fallen since the beginning of the year have been more disruptive than helpful. Usually the rains fall in a gradual manner. These rains have been abrupt and forceful with much of the water unable to be absorbed by the land due the excessive runoff. Many farmers interviewed had not planted in the past two to three weeks. Those who had planted can not expect a harvest until August or September. Most farmers are afraid to plant during this unseasonable rainfall because their crops might not survive or be productive, and they want to save their resources in hope of a good November/December planting.

In addition to suffering a major drought, Indonesia’s economic crisis has caused the price of staples to double in price over a one-year period. One year ago the price of one kilo of rice in South Sulawesi was between 700-800 rupiah. Today, the price is about 2,000 rupiah. The inflation of food prices has severely effected the poor and marginalized populations. Statistics collected prior to the current economic crisis and drought indicated that, in Tana Toraja, 40% or more of the population were living below the poverty line in 3 out of 8 sub-districts (the Government of Indonesia uses "one meal per day" as one of several criteria for measuring poverty line). Nearly 25% of the entire population in the district was below the poverty line and another 51.52% were at risk of falling below the poverty line. This demonstrated the potentially devastating effects of the crisis on food security for this area.

The situation in Sulawesi in general, and South Sulawesi in particular, is serious, with certain areas on the island experiencing food security disaster conditions.

The table below is a sample of the most effected villages in the sub-districts surveyed. Information from discussions with local NGO’s and officials from the CARE South Sulawesi field office, supported by GoI (Family planning office) statistics, indicate that there are villages in every district in South Sulawesi at risk of food security disaster.

Province
District
Paddy Area under cultivation affected by Drought Situation 1997
District Population
Population Identified by GoI Family Planning as "under poverty line"
Population Identified as Seriously Drought Affected
South Sulawesi
Takalar
52.8%
207,537
4,415
7,200
South Sulawesi
Jeneponto
34%
306,554
7,784
4,500
South Sulawesi
Tana Toraja
13%
477,164
120,674
7,300
South Sulawesi
Polmas
26%
87,5677
21,581
5,000**
Central Sulawesi
Tinemba*
4,312
Central Sulawesi
To be determined
3,500*
Southeast Sulawesi
Kendari
3,500
Southeast Sulawesi
To be determined
2,000*
Total
37,312
* Although CWS were not able to assess the situation in Central and Southeast Sulawesi, information from the World Bank report, national media, CWS local partners and local GoI statistics indicate that the situation is worse there due to the dispersion of population, relative inaccessibility and difficult terrain. Estimated beneficiary numbers are based on interviews and reports conducted by CWS. CWS will complete a more detailed survey of these areas in order to determine the exact needs of the population there.

** The Polmas District has one of the largest numbers of people below the poverty line and is at risk. CWS could not perform a detailed assessment of the district, but obtained solid data on the number of people in need from interviews and reports on the area. All the evidence suggests that there is urgent need for immediate aid intervention on the island of Sulawesi.

Background and current situation - South Central Timor (ACT/YAO)

This is the third time in eight years that drought and flooding has caused hardship and suffering to the people of the costal area of the South Beach of South Central Timor Area. In 1991, high rainfall created severe flooding and erosion. Basic food crops were destroyed and the harvest failed. Animals and saleable produce, as an alternative income, were also under threat. In 1993, there was a long dry season with only a little rainfall. All crops were destroyed. Gardens which were replanted several times failed, and there was no harvest.

The 1993 disaster has recurred in 1997/98. The changes in climate since 1991 have severely damaged harvests and the people do not have reserves of food. Furthermore, they no longer have alternative sources of income from either animals or saleable produce, and they are therefore unable to buy food.

People have now resorted to eating putak flour (Icorypa elata Rozb) which is really used as fodder for cattle and pigs. This diet very much affects the health of pregnant women, mothers who are breast feeding, and children. The situation is worsening.

According to the weather forecasts, after the El-Niño disaster there will be a La-Nina disaster. If this forecast eventuates the people’s situation will become even worse in 1998/99. In addition, the situation has been made worse with the unstable economic situation. The continuing monetary crisis has raised the prices for main food products so high that the people cannot buy them.

In the present situation there are 8 villages with about 10,000 people (2,000 families) that have been affected by this disaster in 1997/98.

IV. GOAL And OBJECTIVES

ACT/CWS/CCI proposes to address the situation in both Central and South Sulawesi through a comprehensive program of Food for Work. This program will address the need of communities in distress by:

  • increasing food available through importation of rice until the next harvest;
  • ensuring that children under 5 and lactating mothers do not fall into a state of severe malnourishment and
  • strengthening rural infrastructure related to food security including access to markets, roads and bridges, irrigation and access to potable water.

CWS/CCI’s primary intervention strategy will be Food for Work (FFW) projects targeting the most severely drought-affected villages. CWS/CCI will, together with the Churches of Tana Toraja, and the Church of Central Sulawesi, work together to facilitate the assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation of the community based public works projects.

Food for Work projects will include the following types of activities:

  • road/bridge repair,
  • water conservation engineering,
  • construction of water catchment systems,
  • tree planting and
  • terracing.

The proposed grain ration of rice will provide approximately 45% of the total caloric needs for a family of five:
Target Population
Ration (Rice)
Methodology
One able-bodied household member per family
2 kg/person/day x 20 work days/month = 40 kg/month
Take home ration
A seeds and tools distribution project will also be implemented that will target 2,500 families, approximately 1/3 of the total number of beneficiary families. This intervention is planned to reduce the people’s dependency on foreign aid and facilitate the return to previous production. 12,500 beneficiaries will receive seeds and tools as part of this program.

ACT/YAO aims to alleviate the suffering of the people in 8 villages who have been most affected by the drought, and to rehabilitate the environment by soil conservation.

For the short term, the activities to be implemented will be through a food for work program and will consist of the clearing of fields, making fences, and by giving a daily remuneration. For the long term, there will be repairing of irrigation channels, attempts at stopping erosion, establishing water sources, and agro-forestry. It is hoped that the productivity of the fields can be improved for sustainable agriculture.

In addition it is planned to provide some nutritional packages for babies, pregnant women and lactating mothers, along with a health service.

V. APPEAL BENEFICIARIES

ACT/CWS/CCI: the total number of beneficiaries to be reached by the program will be 49,812.

  • 37,312 beneficiaries will be targeted per month through the Food for Work projects
  • 12,500 beneficiaries will receive seeds and tools in a one-time distribution.
  • The initial focus will be on the 24,000 beneficiaries identified by the assessment team that reside in South Sulawesi, the most populous province on the Island. This population lives in approximately 17 villages in four districts. Takalar, Jeneponto, Tana Toraja, Polmas.
  • 7,812 beneficiaries will be targeted in two districts in Central Sulawesi. Tinemba has been identified as one of the districts while the second one is still to be determined.
  • 5,000 beneficiaries will be targeted in Southeast Sulawesi for food aid in two districts. Kendari is one district and the other has yet to be determined.

ACT/YAO: the target community to receive the benefits directly from these activities will be 2,000 heads of families (10,000 people). They are the community members of 8 villages - Noemuke, Naip, Kiufatu, Tuafanu, Toineke, Oebelo, Oehani and Taus in the coastal district of the South Beach, South Central Timor Area.

The beneficiaries targetted are the people who have directly experienced the drought and do not have an alternative source of income for sustaining life. They will be people whose harvests have failed, and who are far from the health services, such as community health centres or branch community health centres, and whose land is more than 50% in a critical condition.

VI. ADMINISTRATION, FINANCE, MONITORING, REPORTING

ACT/CWS/CCI: CWS management staff and consultants will carry out monitoring and evaluation of the project work using accepted guidelines. At the completion of the project a financial audit will be carried out by an outside firm.

ACT/YAO: Project administration will be carried out by Yayasan Alfa Omega and the Director of GMIT will be responsible for the project.

There will also be a local committee consisting of 5 people and who are local village government, religious and cultural leaders, and 5 trained motivators or cadres living in the location of the activities. The tasks of the local committee, along with the task force will be to prepare community members, assist in the implementation of activities, and carry out monitoring and evaluation.

Monitoring of the project will be carried out three times, at the beginning, middle and end of the project activities under the responsibility of the project implementor.

VII. IMPLEMENTATION TIMETABLE

ACT/CWS/CCI: This is a proposed program for 12 months. Optimally the program will commence July 1, 1998 and run until June 30, 1999, in order to meet the immediate needs of the most vulnerable populations. All indications show that the most vulnerable populations will be at highest risk from now until the annual November and December planting season, and continue to be at risk until the harvest in April 1999.

The other criteria for determining the time frame could also include:

  • continued drop in rain fall,
  • continued rain fall during non-traditional planting months,
  • crop failure,
  • nutritional status and
  • livelihood security.

These factors have to be monitored in order to see if the proposed interventions are adequate.

ACT/YAO:

  • July 1998 - gather information, decide on village priorities and write up and submit a proposal.
  • August 1998 - co-ordination meeting with local committees and division of roles, responsibility, social preparation, decision on timetable of activities with community members.
  • September 1998 to April 1999 - preparation of materials for supporting activities, approaching local public health centre and tractor owners, implementation of activities - cleaning locations, making fences, ploughing fields, planting turi seeds, distribution of nutrition packages and health service, monitoring.
  • May 1999 - evaluation of activities, activity reports and audit.

VIII. CO-ORDINATION

ACT/CWS/CCI: Every effort will be made to co-ordinate activities with other NGO’s such as CRS, CARE, WFP, and others as well as UN Organizations. This will be done through participation in the drought coordination committee to avoid overlap and duplication. There is also a local NGO Forum. This "network" was set up in order to comply with the Indonesian Government’s requirements that such projects be implemented by local non-governmental organisations. The church is not recognised as an NGO, therefore, the churches formed their own local NGOs which are registered with the Government Department of Social Welfare as local NGOs. CWS is working in South Sulawesi with local partners, and has contacts with the local GO community as well as local religious communities. The local churches will be fully integrated into the implementation of the project, and have already given invaluable advice and help with the initial situation assessment. There are many church members already involved in the field who are unparalleled in their knowledge of the people and area. "Village motivators" who have received training in basic rural development skills and have returned to their villages will be an important source of information, and can probably be involved in the implementation of food-for-work activities.

ACT/YAO: From the beginning and throughout the program, those taking part will be village government, religious and cultural leaders, cadres or motivators and community members in the districts to receive moral support and guidance.

IX. APPEAL BUDGETS

ACT/CWS/CCI

ANTICIPATED APPEAL INCOME
USD
ACT Members
ACT Implementing Partner - CWS
112,300
Request to ACT Network
189,812
Other Donors
USAID - Cash (seeds, tools, salaries, admin., etc.)
759,672
USAID - Commodities (rice)
1,755,180
Total Appeal & Estimated Income from all sources
2,816,964

.

Description
Type of Unit
No. of Units
Unit Cost
Budget USD
Food Commodities - USAID:
Rice rations for one able-bodied household member per family. Ration of 2 kg per person per day x 20 work days per month = 40 kgs per month
metric tonne
3,582
490
1,755,180
sub total
1,755,180
In-Country Transport, Storage, Handling:
Customs clearance
metric tonne
3,582
13.00
46,566
Loading and unloading
metric tonne
3,582
2.60
9,313
Storage
metric tonne
3,582
1.95
6,985
Transport
metric tonne
3,582
20.80
74,506
sub total
137,370
Food for Work Support
Tools, equipment, construction materials for community projects: Measured in units of 8,000 person days per unit 18.29 metric tonnes = 1 unit
unit
198.8
460
91,464
sub total
91,464
Seeds and Tools:
12,500 beneficiaries - 5 per family
per family
5,000
14
70,000
sub total
70,000
Training and Technical Assistance:
CWS
person
5
1,000
5,000
Counterpart
person
33
909
30,000
Needs assessment
lump sum
29,000
sub total
64,000
Consultants - 3:
Fees - 4 consultants for 45 days each
per consultant
4
13,584
54,336
Per diem
per day
4
1,811
7,246
Accommodation
per day
4
2,717
10,867
International travel - USA to Jakarta
per trip
4
1,600
6,400
Local travel
each
4
500
2,000
sub total
80,849
Personnel Costs:
Salaries - CWS expatriate staff
person
3
33,332
99,996
Salary - US Coordinator
person
1
49,998
49,998
Salary - CWS National staff
person
27
4,400
118,800
Insurance - expatriate staff
person
3
12,065
36,194
Housing - expatriate staff
person
3
14,200
42,600
Insurance - national staff
person
27
1,457
39,340
Severance pay - national staff
person
27
270
7,302
sub total
394,230
Staff Travel:
International
per return trip
6
2,000
12,000
Re-location allowance
per person
3
500
1,500
In-country
per field visit
172
237
40,771
sub total
54,271
Operational and Administration Expenses:
Rent and utilities
per month
12
2,706.66
32,480
International communications
per month
12
1,066.66
12,800
Communications
per month
12
1,041.66
12,500
Furniture and equipment
lump sum
15,000
Office supplies, maintenance
per month
12
1,500
18,000
Vehicle rent (2)
per month
12
1,050
12,600
Vehicle running costs
per month
12
1,000
12,000
Motorcycle running costs
per month
12
225
2,700
sub total
118,080
Capital Purchases:
Motorcycles - new
each
8
1,000
8,000
Computers
lump
15,000
Photocopier
each
1
1,500
1,500
Camera
each
1
700
700
Furnishings
lump
6,320
sub total
31,520
Evaluation and Audit:
Evaluation
lump sum
10,000
Audit
lump sum
10,000
sub total
20,000
TOTAL ANTICIPATED EXPENDITURE
2,816,964
ACT NETWORK APPEAL REQUEST
USD 189,812
ACT/YAO
ANTICIPATED APPEAL INCOME
USD
ACT Members
Request to ACT Network
177,245
Other Donors
Local Donations
4,562
Total Appeal & Estimated Income from all sources
181,807
EXPENDITURE:
Description
Type of Unit
No. of Units
Unit Cost
Budget Rup
Budget
USD
Food Assistance:
Milk / beans for mothers & babies
packages
400
25,000
10,000,000
760
Transportation
per village
8
500,000
4,000,000
305
sub total
14,000,000
1,065
Agricultural Assistance:
Clearing fields/fence constr.
per family
2,000
450,000
900,000,000
68,436
Plowing fields - 1 ha
per family
2,000
500,000
1,000,000,000
76,040
300 kg turi seeds per field
per 30 kg
20,000
3,000
60,000,000
4,562
sub total
1,960,000,000
149,038
Medical Assistance:
Medicines
per village
8
250,000
2,000,000
153
Honorar/transp. for doctor
per village
8
1,500,000
12,000,000
912
sub total
14,000,000
1,065
Transport, Storage and Operational Costs:
Prep. work/communities
per person
10
350,000
3,500,000
266
Salaries for superv. (10)
per month
10
2,500,000
25,000,000
1,901
Staff travel (10)
per month
10
1,500,000
15,000,000
1,141
Honoraria (2)
per month
10
2,000,000
20,000,000
1,521
Honoraria (2)
per month
10
1,500,000
15,000,000
1,141
Honoraria (8)
per month
10
4,000,000
40,000,000
3,042
Local Comm. - honor.(10)
per month
10
500,000
5,000,000
380
Local Comm. - travel (10)
per month
10
1,500,000
15,000,000
1,141
Stationery & office suppl.
per month
10
500,000
5,000,000
380
Telephone, fax, postage
per month
10
750,000
7,500,000
570
Salaries/benef - YAO staff
per month
10
22,943,000
229,430,000
17,446
Eval. & monit.(5 visits)
per person
10
1,250,000
12,500,000
950
Audit fees
lump sum
10,000,000
760
sub total
402,930,000
30,639
TOTAL ANTICIPATED EXPENDITURE
2,390,930,000
181,807
ACT NETWORK APPEAL REQUEST
USD 177,245
Exchange rate: USD 1.00 = Rup. 13,151

TOTAL APPEAL REQUEST FROM ACT NETWORK: 367,057

APPEAL FACT SHEET

Appeal Number: ASID81

Appeal Name: Revised Indon. El Niño Drought Crisis Appeal

Date Issued: 17 August 98

Project Completion Dates: ACT/CWS/CCI - 30 June 1999, ACT/YAO - 31 May 1999

Project Descriptions:

Church World Service/Communion of Churches of Indonesia will provide a comprehensive Food for Work program with rice provided through USAID, ensuring that children under 5 and lactating mothers do not suffer from malnourishment, and will provide seeds, tools and training to strengthen infrastructures.

Yayasan Alfa Omega will implement a food for work program for 8 villages most affected by the drought. In addition, health services will be provided and nutritional packages for babies, pregnant women and lactating mothers will be distributed.

Implementing Partner
Activity Description

Appeal Target (USD)
CWS/CCI
Food for Work, seeds, tools, training
189,812
YAO
Food for Work, medical assistance, nutritional packages.
177,245
TOTAL APPEAL TARGET: $367,057

Pledges can be communicated to ACT by using the Appeal Pledge Form

ACT - Action by Churches Together
Account Number: 102539/0.01.61
Banque Edouard Constant
Cours de Rive 11
Case postale 3754
1211 Genève 3
SWITZERLAND

APPEAL PLEDGE FORM

(Please fax to the ACT Co-ordinating Office - Fax:++41 22 791 6506)

Appeal Name: Indonesia - El Niño Drought Crisis (Revised Appeal)
Appeal Number: ASID81

Appeal Target: USD 367,057
Project Completion Date: 30 June 1999

Contributing organization: ........................................
Telephone number:..............................

Contact person: ..........................................

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Signature
Date
1. Contributions to the ACT bank account: 102539/0.01.61
Amount
Expected
Other Details
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
and Source of Funding
eg Own Funds, Government, Other
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2. Contributions direct to an implementing partner:

Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Expected
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
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3. Applications to back donors - Governments, ECHO, etc:

Application
Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Made to
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
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