India

India - Flood relief in Bihar, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


ASIN83
The months of July, August and September - the monsoon period, spells floods for the rural Indian population. It is a routine part of their lives and the rural communities have developed mechanisms to cope with the inevitable floods which occur every year. Initially, the current floods too were viewed as a normal annual phenomenon. However, the rains and floods this year exceeded all normal limits both in terms of intensity and time frame. The flood situation was being observed from late July and by the middle of August it was clear that the flood damages this year are unlike any in the recent past.

Heavy rains in the catchment areas occurred between the second and third week of July and flooding started around the 4th week of July. Flood waters have not begun to recede which means that most of these areas have been under water for almost a month now.

Per the UN Resident Coordinator in New Delhi, "it is estimated that some 22,700 villages in 167 districts have been affected, covering an area of approximately, 6.4 million hectares, of which an esimated 2.9 million hectares of crop land have been lost. The housing sector was also seriously affected, with some 670,000 housees partially/completely damaged."

ACT Members LWF-India and CASA, in a coordinated effort, will provide relief assistance in Bihar, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh States by distributing food and non food items to a varying number of families.

Your immediate attention and support for these programmes will be highly appreciated.

Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

We would appreciate being informed of any intent to submit an application for EU funding, and the subsequent results. We thank you in advance for your kind cooperation.

For further information, please contact:

ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (phone 41 22 791 6032 or mobile phone ++ 41 89 203 6055)

ACT Web Site address: http://www.act-intl.org

Rev. Myra Blyth, Director, WCC/Unit IV

Miriam Lutz, ACT Co-ordinator

Rev. Rudolf Hinz, Director, LWF/World Service


ACT/LWF-INDIA

I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER

LWF/Department of World Service - India Programme (ACT/LWF-India).

II. IMPLEMENTING MEMBER

Lutheran World Federation/World Service - India Programme (ACT/LWF-India) is a relief and development organisation, established with the mandate to alleviate the suffering of distressed groups irrespective of caste, religion, gender or political affiliation.

III. DESCRIPTION OF THE EMERGENCY SITUATION

Widespread Flooding: Torrential rains in the catchment areas of several rivers originating the adjoining Nepal and flowing through North Bihar have inundated 23 out of the 55 districts in the northern India state of Bihar. Malda district, in West Bengal, further downstream on the river Ganga from Bihar, has also been severely inundated. In Bihar, an estimated 10 million people living in more than 61,000 villages have been affected. Most parts of Malda district are under water and around 1 million people have been displaced. No official figures on the extent of damages caused by the floods have been released by the Government of Bihar. In Malda, 1,323 villages have been affected, destroying more than 14,000 houses. Another 34,000 houses have been severely damaged. Standing crops on more than 60,000 hectares have also been damaged.

IV. LOCATION OF DISASTER

23 Districts in north and central Bihar the state neighbouring West Bengal, where one district, Malda has been affected. Rural, semi urban and urban areas of these districts have been affected. Standing crops, houses, drinking water sources, roads, embankments, irrigation systems and other infrastructure have been damaged and/or destroyed. LWF-India will work in 4 of the worst affected districts, i.e. Madhubani, Darbhanga, Supaul and Bhagalpur in Bihar and Malda in West Bengal.

V. DESCRIPTION OF OVERALL DAMAGES

Bihar, in the northern part of India is facing the worst floods in recent times. Incessant rains since the middle of July have inundated 26 out of the 55 districts of Bihar. Over 10 million people have been affected, with 221 human lives lost. Approximately 2.5 million people from the districts of West Champaran, Madhubani, Darbhanga, Supaul, Bhagalpur, Khatihar, Purnea and Kishangunj remain marooned, with little or no relief materials reaching them. This has affected 7150 villages over an area of 3,203,000 hectares and 1,345,000 hectares of cropland.

River and canal embankments have been breached in over hundreds of locations. Irrigation and drainage canal systems have reportedly collapsed. Road and rail transport and telecommunication facilities to the region have been shattered and the region remains virtually cut off from the rest of the country. No firm figures are available on the number of deaths caused by the floods. Official sources put the number of deaths at 189 but unofficial sources indicate that it could be many times more. Gastroenteritis and other water borne diseases have broken out in epidemic form. Visits to the local hospitals in Darbhanga have confirmed that there has been an outbreak of cholera in the region.

There has been no let up in the rains. All the rivers including the Ganga, continue to rise alarmingly. Vehicle movements are stopped either because the roads have been breached by flood waters or because people from flooded villages have taken shelter on the roads.

People live under makeshift temporary shelters on the roads and embankments. Very little relief materials are reaching the marooned people. Only accessible areas close to the towns, have received some relief assistance. The fate of the many in the remote and inaccessible areas is unknown.

If the situation in the accessible areas is a true reflection of the damages caused by the floods, it must be immense. For instance, on the 80 kilometer drive between Muzzafarpur and Darbhanga towns, on either side of the road, one sees only miles and miles of water with occasional tree tops visible above the water level. The overall estimate is that floods have destroyed standing crops and property worth Rs. 1.380 million.

In Darbhanga district alone, an estimated 1.5 million people in 15 blocks and 148 gram panchayats are fully affected. Present official estimates indicate that approximately 23,000 houses have also been destroyed. The situation in the other districts is equally grim.

In Malda district, more than 1,300 villages and one million population are seriously affected. Since the Ganga has breached embankments in several places and is still flowing above the high danger level mark, the situation is threatening. Flood waters have entered Malda town, the district headquarters. Villagers have taken shelter on roads and embankments, but the national highway is also under water in several places. This could possibly be one of the worst floods faced by Malda in recent times.

VI. BENEFICIARY INFORMATION

Socially and economically deprived families from the rural population affected by floods will be the target group.

The projected targets are more an expression of LWF-India capacity than a reflection of the overall needs. Since large areas and population groups have been affected, the needs are immense. But with the limited resources, LWF-India will work in the worst affected districts in selected villages with a concentration of marginalised population groups. While all sections of the population have suffered, these groups, by virtue of their inherent socio-economic deprivation are less likely to recover quickly without external assistance. They will represent LWF-India target groups.

VII. NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES & DESCRIPTION OF TARGETED ASSISTANCE

Temporary Shelter : 10,000 plastic sheets (polythene, 4 m x 3 m) will be distributed, one to each displaced family who have taken shelter on roads, embankments and high grounds.

Food Rations : dry rations will be distributed to 10,000 displaced families on a weekly basis for two weeks at the rates listed below. Average family size is estimated to be six persons per family.

  • Beaten Rice (chira) - 5 kgs per family per week
  • Molasses - 1 kg per family per week
  • Bengal gram - 5 kgs per family per week

Supplementary Nutrition : The programme will provide one supplementary meal a day to 10,000 persons (comprising children under 6, pregnant and nursing mothers) for one month. The emergency meal will consist of one glass of milk (approximately 30 grammes of milk powder) and one high protein biscuit per person.

Family Assistance : Most families have lost all their belongings in the floods. There is an urgent need to distribute clothes for daily wear. Since winter is just around the corner, some warm clothing in the form of blankets will also be distributed.

10,000 families will each receive:

  • 2 blankets
  • 1 packet of candles
  • 5 boxes of matches

10,000 sarees for women, 10,000 dhotis/lungis for men and 10,000 sets of children's dresses will also be distributed.

Medical Aid : Medical camps will be organised in villages to detect and treat cases of water borne diseases, particularly gastroenteritis etc. General sanitation drives will be conducted in villages to clean up the debris. Bleaching powder and lime etc., will be used to prevent the spread of diseases. Around 50,000 cases are expected to be treated.

Drinking Water : Twenty tubewells with raised platforms and hand pump heads above the high flood level mark will be sunk. Each disaster shelter will be provided with 2 tubewells. The depth of the wells will vary between 80-90 meters. Approximately 2,700 meters of GI pipes and 20 India Mark II handpump heads will be required. Construction of platforms will require 240,000 bricks and 6 tonnes of cement. The tubewells will benefit around 1,000 families.

Community Disaster Shelter-cum-schools : 10 community disaster shelters-cum-schools will be built, one each in 10 villages. Existing government recognised primary or middle schools with temporary buildings and structures will be rebuilt and upgraded to serve also as disaster shelters during floods. These buildings will have raised plinths, brick masonry walls and reinforced cement concrete roof. Each shelter will have adequate sanitation facilities, separate toilets for men and women as well as two tubewells to provide safe drinking water.

Each unit will have a covered area of approximately 15,00 sq.ft. When used as a school, a unit can accommodate around 300 children and as a flood shelter accommodates up to 500 persons. To construct the 10 units, the major items required are bricks (560,000 numbers), cement (300 tonnes) and steel rods (28 tonnes).

The shelter-cum-schools will be constructed in Malda, where ACT/LWF-India has in the recent past, assisted flood affected families to build improved design flood resistant houses. These improved design houses have withstood the fury of the floods and the construction of the shelters will further improve the disaster preparedness capabilities of these communities. Village communities will provide voluntary labour to construct the buildings and help to transport construction materials. Disaster preparedness and management training programme will also be organised in these communities.

House Repair Materials : 1,000 families of agricultural labours, members of the scheduled caste and scheduled tribal communities, will be provided precast reinforced cement concrete pillars, bamboo poles, sawn timber and some roofing materials to rebuild, repair and strengthen their traditional houses to prevent them from collapsing in future floods. A part of the roofing materials, normally tiles and wood for doors and windows will be salvaged from the damaged houses. Walls will be constructed by the families using traditional materials. LWF-India personnel will closely monitor the house reconstruction activities.

House building assistance will be extended to flood victims in Bihar. Consequently, some modification in the design may become necessary to suit the local conditions, customs and culture. To build the houses, materials required will be 12,000 RCC pillars, 40,000 number of bamboos, 6,000 cft of timber, 400,000 tiles and 150 tonnes of cement.

VIII. PROCUREMENT

All items other than high protein biscuits will be procured locally in compliance with ACT/LWF- India guidelines and policy. High protein emergency biscuits which have been gifted by other ACT Members in the past are available.

IX. PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE & METHODOLOGY

Using internal resources, ACT/LWF-India has initiated relief activities such as distribution of temporary shelter materials and dry food rations in the last week of August. All relief operations will be completed within three months.

Rehabilitation activities such as construction of community disaster shelter-cum-schools, sinking of tubewells and distribution of house building materials will be initiated from December, 1998 by when flood waters would have receded and land adequately dry and firm for construction. These activities will be concluded within 9 months i.e. by August, 1999. Thus the total project span will be 12 months, from September 1998 to August 1999.

Personnel : The project activities will be implemented by a team of 45 people including 6 women volunteers. On completion of the relief activities in three months, the number of staff will be reduced to 25 persons who will carry out the rehabilitation part of the programme.

X. GENERAL

The houses which are proposed to be built will have better flood resistant capabilities than the traditional houses built by rural communities. The design of the house has been developed by LWF-India based on its experience of working with flood affected population. In the last couple of years, LWF-India has built several hundred houses of this design in Malda district. The Rapid Assessment and other survey teams have found that these houses have withstood the impact of the severe floods this year. In fact in many villages apart from permanent cement concrete structures, these are the only houses which have not collapsed. As anticipated, the mud plinths and walls made of bamboo and mud have been damaged but the roof and the structure remain steady and strong. Consequently, the rural families will require only limited time and efforts to rebuild their homes quickly. In Bihar too the same design will be used with minor modifications if necessary to suit the local environment.

XI. ACT APPEAL BUDGET / LWF-INDIA

ESTIMATED PROJECT INCOME

So far, no other donor or agencies have been approached for support. Items distributed have been drawn from the emergency stock pile, supplemented with some local purchases using internal resources.

PROJECT EXPENSES

Description
Type of units
Number of units
Cost/unit INR
Total Cost INR
Total USD
Temporary shelter:
Plastic sheeting
each
10,000
290.50
2,905,000
70,000
Sub-total
2,905,000
70,000
Food:
Chira (pressed rice)
Gur (jaggery)
Raw Bengal gram
Protein biscuits - existing stock
Milk
kg
kg
kg


kg
100,000
40,000
25,000


9,000
12.45
14.94
20.75


78.85
1,245,000
597,600
518,750
0
709,650
30,000
14,400
12,500
0
17,100
Sub-total
3,071,000
74,000
Family Assistance:
Blankets
Lungis/Dhotis
Saris
Children garments
Candles
Match boxes
each
each
each
each
pkts
pkts
20,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
50,000
83.00
62.25
62.25
52.00
14.94
0.83
1,660,000
622,500
622,500
520,000
149,400
41,500
40,000
15,000
15,000
12,530
3,600
1,000
Sub-total
3,615,900
87,130
Medical Assistance: approx.50,000 cases
Antibiotics
Anti diarrhoeal
Sanitation, water purification
General medicines
lump sum
lump sum
lump sum
lump sum
487,625
78,850
327,850
134,875
11,750
1,900
7,900
3,250
Sub-total
1,029,200
24,800
Water and Sanitation:
India Mark II hand pump
Strainers - brass
Plug cutter
G I-PVC pipe 4" diam.
G I-PVC pipe 1.5" diam.
1 1/4" diam. G I pipe
Sockets
Cement
Bricks
Stone chips
each
each
each
metres
metres
metres
each
bags
pieces
c.ft.
20
40
20
500
1,800
400
20
120
24,000
600
4,150
332
83
415
103.75
103.75
145.25
157.70
2.80
33.75
83,000
13,280
1,660
207,500
186,750
41,500
2,905
18,924
67,200
20,250
2,000
320
40
5,000
4,500
1,000
70
456
1,620
488
Sub-total
642,969
15,494
Shelter:
Concrete pillars - 11ft
Concrete pillars - 8 ft.
Bamboo poles 9" x 30 ft
Bamboo poles 3" x 25 ft
Timber rafters
Roof tiles
Ridge tiles
Cement
Stone chips
Nails, coal tar, etc.
Sand
each
each
each
each
c.ft.
each
each
bags
c.ft.
lump sum
c.ft.
8,000
4,000
20,000
20,000
6,000
400,000
45,000
3,000
15,000


20,000
269.75
228.25
49.80
29.05
302.95
4.15
4.98
157.70
33.75


20.75
2,158,000
913,000
996,000
581,000
1,817,700
1,660,000
224,100
473,100
506,250
830,000
415,000
52,000
22,000
24,000
14,000
43,800
40,000
5,400
11,400
12,199
20,000
10,000
Sub-total
10,574,150
254,799
Community Shelters-Cum Schools - 10:
Bricks
Sand
Cement
Stone chips
Steel rods
Lime
Paint
Supporting items
Size wood
Centering planks
piece
c.ft.
bags
c.ft.
kg
kg
litres
lump sum
c.ft.
sets
560,000
60,000
6,000
18,000
28,000
2,000
250


550
5
2.80
10.03
157.70
33.75
20.75
6.25
155.62


415.00
29,050
1,568.000
601,800
946,200
607,500
581,000
12,500
38,905
62,250
228,250
145,250
37,783
14,501
22,800
14,639
14,000
301
937
1,500
5,500
3,500
Sub-total
4,791,655
115,461
Construction Labour:
Shelter construction - pillars
Water wells - masonry
School/shelter - masonry
Carpentry
each
each
each
each
1,000
20
10
10
600
7,470
62,250
10,375
600,000
149,400
622,500
103,750
14,458
3,600
15,000
2,500
Sub-total
1,475,650
35,558
Transport:
Shelter materials
Water well materials
School/shelter materials
each
each
each
1,000
20
10
500
450
6,000
500,000
9,000
60,000
12,048
217
1,446
Sub-total
569,000
13,711
Staff Salaries:
Co-ordinators - 2
Accounts assistants - 2
Civil engineer - 1
Social workers - 20
Social workers - 10
Women volunteers - 6
Support staff - 3
month
month
month
month
month
month
month
12
12
9
3
9
9
12
16,600
12,450
6,225
83,000
41,500
24,900
6,225
199,200
149,400
56,025
249,000
373,500
224,100
74,700
4,800
3,600
1,350
6,000
9,000
5,400
1,800
Sub-total
1,325,925
31,950
Operational Costs:
Office rent
Warehouse, storage
Local transport
Staff travel
Electricity
Telephone, fax
Office supplies
month
month
month
month
month
month
month
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
4,150
2,075
8,300
8,300
2,075
8,300
10,375
49,800
24,900
99,600
99,600
24,900
99,600
124,500
1,200
600
2,400
2,400
600
2,400
3,000
Sub-total
522,900
12,600
Vehicle Costs:
Mini trucks - 1
Motor cycles - 6
Hire charge for boats - 4
month
month
month
12
12
2
12,450
12,450
62,250
149,400
149,400
124,500
3,600
3,600
3,600
Sub-total
572,700
13,800
Other:
Training for Disaster Prep.
Evaluation
person
lump sum
1,200

166

199,200
124,500
4,800
3,000
Sub-total
323,700
7,800
TOTAL EXPENDITURE 31,419,749
757,103

TOTAL APPEAL BUDGET EXPENSES ACT/LWF-India: $ 757,103

Exchange rate: 1 USD = 41.50 INR


ACT/CASA

I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER

Church’s Auxiliary for Social Services (CASA)

II. IMPLEMENTING MEMBER

CASA has a history of responding to emergencies and disasters since 1947. CASA’s response is regardless of considerations of caste, colour, creed, religion, language or community. Operating on an all-India basis, CASA handles 60-70 emergencies -both natural and man-made - per year. CASA has a decentralised disaster preparedness plan. This system has been created through the establishment of a wider and more effective infrastructure network and capacity building programme for CASA staff, representatives of the Churches, and identified partner organisations, both at the disaster management and grassroots level, who can at short notice respond to call for assistance in consultation with, and on behalf of, the Churches in India. This network is backed by relief materials pre-stocked at CASA’s warehouses at strategic locations throughout the country. The quantum of relief supplies stored at these locations at any given point of time is decided on the basis of hazard mapping done by CASA, and is subject to constant review and update.

III. LOCATION & DESCRIPTION OF THE EMERGENCY SITUATION

UTTAR PRADESH

The flood situation in eastern Uttar Pradesh has affected 39 districts out of which Gorakhpur and Shahjahanpur districts are the worst affected with the total death toll mounting to more than 600. In Gorakhpur district the floods have been caused by the overflowing of the Rapti and Ghagra rivers flowing much above the danger mark. Rail and road links to the affected areas continued to be snapped while army hs been called in to assist the local administration in the worst hit areas of Gorakhpur district. Out of a total number of 156 flood embankments, 21 have been breached while 22 others have been declared sensitive.

Flash floods in the Ramganga river and some smaller rivers have caused a severe flood situation in Shahjahanpur district. More than 24 villages of Jaitipur block have been inundated.

The State Government has acknowledged that relief measures have proved inadequate as only 26.3% of the total region affected by the flash floods has been covered. Total area affected in Uttar Pradesh is estimated at 2,312,000 hectares, covering a population of 9,890,000, a crop area of 1,194,000 hectares and 85,441 houses.

BIHAR

The flood situation in Bihar is equally grim with as many as 10 districts in the grip of severe flooding. After discussion with LWF-India, which is also taking up flood relief programmes in some of the affected parts of Bihar, CASA has decided to concentrate relief efforts on Sitamarhi district, parts of which are among the worst affected areas of Bihar State. The situation has been caused by flash floods of the river Candak and its tributaries. A total number of 42 villages with a population of 73,025 (15,525 families) have been affected. Out of this population, 10,975 families live below the poverty line. The loss to agriculture is estimated at Rs. 245 lakhs. The relief measures instituted by the Government have proved to be extremely inadequate so much so that there have been demonstrations by the flood victims against Government inaction resulting in police firing in which 5 people died.

WEST BENGAL

In West Bengal all major rivers, i.e. Ganga, Mahananda and Fulahar are flowing above the danger mark. The three North Bengal districts of Malda, Jalpaiguri and Murshidabad are the worst affected. A population of over 10 lakh has been affected. The Army, along with the civil administration, is engaged in rescue operations. It is estimated that a total of 56,624 houses have been partially or fully destroyed by the floods. Standing crop in 75,355 hectares have been destroyed. As already stated, CASA will not work in the district of Malda since LWF-India is already working there. CASA is in the process of identifying the worst hit areas of the other districts for its relief programme.

Unless relief is provided on a priority basis to the affected people in both these states, the situation will rapidly worsen.

IV. BENEFICIARY INFORMATION

Most of the affected people have lost their belongings and suffered grave damage to their houses. The damage in the rural areas as well as the urban is severe. The affected people belong to all sections of the society including urban and rural artisans, non-skilled workers, small and marginal farmers, landless labourers, etc.

V. DESCRIPTON OF TARGETED ASSISTANCE & TIME FRAME

CASA is targeting its humanitarian aid at 4,000 families who have lost most of their belongings and are now living in the relief camps set up by the district administration and state government. They are in desperate need of clothes, domestic kitchen utensils, bedsheets and blankets.

CASA will be distributing 500 sets of relief material in Gorakhpur district in collaboration with Shramik Bharati one of its partners NGOs in Uttar Pradesh.

In Shahjahanpur district, CASA will be distributing 500 sets of relief material in association with NAVE Institute located at Shahajahanpur. The programme in Bihar, which will cover 1,000 families, will be implemented by CASA directly. In West Bengal too CASA will be extending relief to 2,000 families under a programme being taken up by CASA directly. 500 homeless families in the flood affected areas of this state will also be provided with tarpaulins for construction of temporary shelters.

The time frame for implementation will be till 20th of September, 1998.

VI. IMPLEMENTATION METHODOLOGY

The relief programme will be implemented directly by CASA with the assistance and cooperation of two partner NGOs i.e. Shramik Bharati in Gorakhpur district and NAVE Institute in Shahajahanpur district. The programmes at Bihar and West Bengal will be implemented directly.

Villages and Community leaders will help to organise the survey and identification of the beneficiaries along with the partner NGO's, local church leaders and Government machinery.

VII. GENERAL

The flood waters have seriously damaged the mud and thatch houses common in most of the villages. Means of livelihood from agriculture and livestock are critically affected. The village communities will take a long time to recover from this disaster. Shortage of local food resources and a steep rise in price of essential commodities cannot be ruled out.

VIII. COORDINATION

Discussions have taken place between LWF-India and CASA to coordinate the overall relief programme in order to avoid duplication. As LWF-India is operating in West Bengal and Bihar, CASA will work in a very small way in these two states. For instance, CASA will not operate in Malda area, which is being extensively covered by LWF-India.

Grassroot level NGOs, district authorities and elected representatives of the people from Bihar and West Bengal have requested LWF-India to implement relief programmes. The cooperation and services of these organisations and individuals will be used to identify the worst affected areas and village communities. In Bihar, where there are possibilities of looting of relief materials by people desperate for food and shelter, the network of local NGOs will be used to implement relief programmes. These NGOs under local leadership will be in a better position to use their goodwill and local influence to prevent looting of materials.

IX. ACT APPEAL BUDGET / CASA

ESTIMATED PROJECT INCOME

PROJECT EXPENSES

Description
Type of Units
Number of Units
Cost/Unit INR
Total Cost INR
Total USD
Emergency Relief
Relief Sets:
Saree
Dhoty
Blankets
Kitchen utensils


Piece
Piece
Piece
Set


4,000
4,000
4,000
4,000


85
45
100
140


340,000
180,000
400,000
560,000


8,193
4,337
9,639
13,494
Sub-total
1,480,000
35,663
Tarpaulins
Piece
500
770
385,000
9,277
Transportation & Handling
Long-distance & local
Lump sum
95,000
2,289
Implementation & Admin. Costs
Staff salaries - 7
Honorarium for vol. - 20
Hotel accomm. for 7 staff
Food for 7 staff
Fuel & maint. - 2 vehicles
Tel./Fax etc.
Per day
Per day
Per day
Per day
Per day
Lump sum
20
20
20
20
20

1,351
800
1,750
100
1,600

27,020
16,000
35,000
2,000
32,000
16,780
651
386
843
48
771
404
Sub-total
128,800
3,103
TOTAL
2,088,800
50,333

TOTAL APPEAL BUDGET EXPENSES ACT/CASA - $ 50,333

APPEAL FACT SHEET

Appeal Number: ASIN83 - Appeal Name: Flood Relief in Bihar, W.B. & U. Pradesh

Date Issued: September 1, 1998 - Project Completion Date: LWF 31 Aug. 99

CASA 20 Sept. 98

Project Description:

Heavy rains during the monsoon period (July-September) exceeded the normal limits and flooded the districts of Bihar, West Bengal and Uttar Pradesh.

ACT Members LWF-India and CASA are assisting the rural populations by distributing food and non food relief items to a varying number of families.

Implementing Partner
Activity Description
Appeal Target (USD)
ACT/LWF-India
Food, shelter, relief items, medical assistance, water & sanitation
757,103
ACT/CASA
Relief sets
50,333

TOTAL APPEAL TARGET: $ 807,436

___________________________________

*** Pledges can be communicated to ACT by using the Appeal Pledge Form *** ________________________________________

ACT - Action by Churches Together

Account Number: 102539/0.01.61
Banque Edouard Constant
Cours de Rive 11 - Case postale 3754
1211 Genève 3, SWITZERLAND


APPEAL PLEDGE FORM
(Please fax to the ACT Co-ordinating Office - Fax:++41 22 791 6506)

Appeal Name: Flood Relief in Bihar, W.B. & U. Pradesh

Appeal Number: ASIN83

Appeal Target: USD 807,436

Project Completion Date: LWF: 31 Aug. 99 - CASA: 20 Sept. 98

Contributing organization: ........................................
Telephone number:..............................

Contact person: ..........................................

.....................................
.....................
Signature
Date
1. Contributions to the ACT bank account: 102539/0.01.61
Amount Expected Other Details
(indicate currency) Transfer Date and Source of Funding
eg Own Funds, Government, Other
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2. Contributions direct to an implementing partner:

Implementing Appeal Amount Expected
Partner Component (indicate currency) Transfer Date
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3. Applications to back donors - Governments, ECHO, etc:

Application Implementing Appeal Amount
Made to Partner Component (indicate currency)
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