Honduras + 8 more

Latin America & The Caribbean Weekly Situation Update (24-30 January 2022) As of 31 January 2022

Attachments

KEY FIGURES

86M PEOPLE LIVE IN EXTREME POVERTY IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN  

Source:

Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC)  

REGIONAL: EXTREME POVERTY   

In the recently-published Social Panorama of Latin America, the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC) estimates that the number of people living in extreme poverty in the region increased by around 5 million between 2020 and 2021, bringing the total number of people facing extreme poverty to a staggering 86 million.
Extreme poverty rose from 13.1 to 13.8 per cent in the past year, representing a 27-year setback in the fight for its eradication.   

Despite a slight decline in overall poverty, more than 200 million people are still poor in the region today. The health and socio-economic repercussions of the pandemic continue to disproportionately affect those already most vulnerable in the region, including women and children, rural communities and indigenous peoples.   

ECLAC says that the modest economic recovery of 2020 is not enough to mitigate the deep economic and social scars left by the pandemic, calling on governments to maintain cash-based support – which was slashed by more than 50 per cent in the first 10 months of 2021 compared to the corresponding period in 2020 – strengthen social protection systems and facilitate a safe return to in-person classes in 2022.    

KEY FIGURES  

2.2M PEOPLE FACE CRISIS LEVEL (IPC PHASE 3 OR ABOVE) FOOD INSECURITY 

Source:

Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC)

HONDURAS: FOOD INSECURITY    

According to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) report for December 2021-August 2022, more than 2.2 million Hondurans – 24 per cent of the population analyzed – will continue to face crisis levels of food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 or above) through February 2022, including 241,000 in Emergency (IPC Phase 4). In the coming months, the already dire food security situation in the country is expected to worsen, driven largely by a chronic lack of employment, depletion of food reserves, increasing prices and international supply chain crises. Crisis levels of food insecurity are expected to rise between June and August 2022, when 2.6 million people – up 18 per cent from February 2022 – are projected to be classified in IPC Phase 3 or above, with both the lean season and the peak of cyclonic activity in the Atlantic (AugustSeptember) just around the corner.   

Seventeen of Honduras’ 18 departments are classified in IPC Phase 3, with Gracias a Dios (43 per cent in IPC Phase 3 or above), Lempira (32 per cent) and La Paz (30 per cent) exhibiting the highest levels of severity. These departments, among the hardest hit by twin storms Eta and Iota in 2020, have large numbers of extremely vulnerable indigenous populations, who face unique food and nutrition challenges.

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.