Haiti

Secretary-General's remarks at Wreath-laying Ceremony marking the Tenth Anniversary of the Earthquake in Haiti [EN/FR]

Source
Published
Origin
View original

Bilingual, as delivered:

Nous sommes réunis aujourd'hui pour honorer la mémoire des centaines de milliers d'Haïtiens qui ont perdu la vie dans le tremblement de terre dévastateur du 12 janvier 2010 et pour exprimer nos condoléances et notre solidarité aux millions de personnes qui continuent de subir les effets de cette tragédie.

Lorsque le tremblement de terre a frappé, de nombreux Haïtiens entamaient la nouvelle année avec un sentiment renouvelé d'optimisme et de confiance dans l'avenir de leur pays.

En quelques secondes, leurs espoirs sont devenus poussière.

Des villes ont été détruites, des centaines de milliers de personnes ont été tuées et des millions de vies ont changé pour toujours.

Je n'oublierai jamais le choc et la tristesse à travers le monde et dans l'ensemble des Nations Unies à mesure que l'ampleur de la tragédie est devenue claire.

Une opération humanitaire sans précédent a sauvé des vies au cours des premiers jours et des premières semaines, grâce au travail, main dans la main, des organisations d'aide internationales et des premiers intervenants haïtiens et partenaires locaux sur le terrain.

Mais le tremblement de terre a créé de nouvelles menaces sérieuses pour la sécurité, la stabilité et la prospérité d'Haïti. Se remettre des nombreuses blessures infligées par une telle catastrophe – blessures physiques, émotionnelles, sociales et financières – représenterait un grand défi pour n'importe quelle nation.

Following one of the darkest days in its history, Haiti drew on the courage and determination of its people and the assistance of its many friends. Roads were cleared, homes were rebuilt, schools were reopened, businesses got back to work.

Among the many challenges, the United Nations deeply regrets the loss of life and suffering caused by the cholera epidemic. I welcome the significant progress that has been made towards eliminating the disease. We are also committed to resolving pending cases of sexual exploitation and abuse.

The magnitude of the tragedy was such that it took many years for any sense of normality to return. Today, insecurity and slow economic growth are contributing to rising social tensions and a deteriorating humanitarian situation. I urge Haitians to resolve their differences through dialogue and to resist any escalation that could reverse the gains of the past decade.

The United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti and the 19 agencies, funds and programmes present in the country will continue to work in partnership with the Haitian people on their path to recovery and prosperity.

Today we also remember the 102 colleagues, from thirty different countries, who died in Haiti – the single greatest loss in the United Nations history.

I have just paid my respects at the moving new memorial, “A Breath”, that has been brought here from Port-au-Prince. I thank the sculptor, Davide Dormino, and everyone who helped to transport it. I was particularly impressed by the inclusion of rubble from the Hotel Christopher, where so many of our colleagues perished.

Those who died were in Haiti to help build stability and prosperity and consolidate peace and security, with international, national and local partners. Among them were policy advisers, political officers, humanitarians, development specialists, security officers, soldiers, lawyers, drivers and doctors.

When the quake hit, many United Nations personnel took part in search and rescue operations and carried injured people into the United Nations compound. Some had the heartbreaking duty of accompanying the body of a colleague home to their loved ones, for burial or cremation.

A loss of this scale leaves permanent reminders and scars, on Haiti and on the United Nations. It binds us together and we will never forget.

Today, we renew our deepest condolences to the families and friends of the victims, and our sympathy for those whose lives continue to be affected by this tragedy.

We also renew our commitment to honour the legacy of those we have lost, by working alongside the people and Government of Haiti, and with the country’s friends and supporters throughout the international community.

Together, we will safeguard Haiti’s future and build lives of peace, prosperity and dignity for all Haitians.

Kenbe fèm. [Stay strong/keep going.]

Thank you.

Mesi anpil [Thank you.]

And now let us pause for a moment of silence in memory of those who died.

*****
All-English

We are here together today to honour the memory of the hundreds of thousands of Haitians who lost their lives in the devastating earthquake on the 12th of January 2010, and to express our condolences and solidarity with the millions who continue to suffer the impact of this tragedy.

When the earthquake struck, many Haitians were starting the new year with a sense of renewed optimism and trust in the future of their country.

In a few seconds, their hopes turned to dust.

Cities were destroyed, hundreds of thousands of people were killed, and millions of lives were changed for ever.

I will never forget the shock and sadness across the world and throughout the United Nations as the scale of the tragedy became clear.

An unprecedented humanitarian operation saved lives in the first days and weeks, as international aid organizations worked with Haitian first responders and local partners on the ground.

But the earthquake created serious new threats to Haiti’s security, stability and prosperity. Recovering from the many wounds it inflicted – physical, emotional, social and financial – would challenge any nation.

Following one of the darkest days in its history, Haiti drew on the courage and determination of its people and the assistance of its many friends. Roads were cleared, homes were rebuilt, schools were reopened, businesses got back to work.

Among the many challenges, the United Nations deeply regrets the loss of life and suffering caused by the cholera epidemic. I welcome the significant progress that has been made towards eliminating the disease. We are also committed to resolving pending cases of sexual exploitation and abuse.

The magnitude of the tragedy was such that it took many years for any sense of normality to return. Today, insecurity and slow economic growth are contributing to rising social tensions and a deteriorating humanitarian situation. I urge Haitians to resolve their differences through dialogue and to resist any escalation that could reverse the gains of the past decade.

The United Nations Integrated Office in Haiti and the 19 agencies, funds and programmes present in the country will continue to work in partnership with the Haitian people on their path to recovery and prosperity.

Today we also remember the 102 colleagues, from thirty different countries, who died in Haiti – the single greatest loss in the United Nations history.

I have just paid my respects at the moving new memorial, “A Breath”, that has been brought here from Port-au-Prince. I thank the sculptor, Davide Dormino, and everyone who helped to transport it. I was particularly impressed by the inclusion of rubble from the Hotel Christopher, where so many of our colleagues perished.

Those who died were in Haiti to help build stability and prosperity and consolidate peace and security, with international, national and local partners. Among them were policy advisers, political officers, humanitarians, development specialists, security officers, soldiers, lawyers, drivers and doctors.

When the quake hit, many United Nations personnel took part in search and rescue operations and carried injured people into the United Nations compound. Some had the heartbreaking duty of accompanying the body of a colleague home to their loved ones, for burial or cremation.

A loss of this scale leaves permanent reminders and scars, on Haiti and on the United Nations. It binds us together and we will never forget.

Today, we renew our deepest condolences to the families and friends of the victims, and our sympathy for those whose lives continue to be affected by this tragedy.

We also renew our commitment to honour the legacy of those we have lost, by working alongside the people and Government of Haiti, and with the country’s friends and supporters throughout the international community.

Together, we will safeguard Haiti’s future and build lives of peace, prosperity and dignity for all Haitians.

Kenbe fèm. [Stay strong/keep going.]

Thank you.

Mesi anpil [Thank you.]

And now let us pause for a moment of silence in memory of those who died.

****

Nous sommes réunis aujourd'hui pour honorer la mémoire des centaines de milliers d'Haïtiens qui ont perdu la vie dans le tremblement de terre dévastateur du 12 janvier 2010 et pour exprimer nos condoléances et notre solidarité aux millions de personnes qui continuent de subir les effets de cette tragédie.

Lorsque le tremblement de terre a frappé, de nombreux Haïtiens entamaient la nouvelle année avec un sentiment renouvelé d'optimisme et de confiance dans l'avenir de leur pays.

En quelques secondes, leurs espoirs sont devenus poussière.

Des villes ont été détruites, des centaines de milliers de personnes ont été tuées et des millions de vies ont changé pour toujours.

Je n'oublierai jamais le choc et la tristesse à travers le monde et dans l'ensemble des Nations Unies à mesure que l'ampleur de la tragédie est devenue claire.

Une opération humanitaire sans précédent a sauvé des vies au cours des premiers jours et des premières semaines, grâce au travail, main dans la main, des organisations d'aide internationales et des premiers intervenants haïtiens et partenaires locaux sur le terrain.

Mais le tremblement de terre a créé de nouvelles menaces sérieuses pour la sécurité, la stabilité et la prospérité d'Haïti. Se remettre des nombreuses blessures infligées par une telle catastrophe – blessures physiques, émotionnelles, sociales et financières – représenterait un grand défi pour n'importe quelle nation.

Au lendemain de l'un des jours les plus sombres de son histoire, Haïti a pu compter sur le courage et la détermination de son peuple et l'aide de ses nombreux amis. Des routes ont été déblayées, des maisons ont été reconstruites, des écoles ont été rouvertes, des entreprises ont repris leurs activités.

Parmi les nombreuses difficultés demeurant, l’ONU regrette profondément les pertes en vies humaines et les souffrances causées par l’épidémie de choléra. Je salue les progrès importants qui ont été accomplis vers l’élimination de la maladie. Nous sommes également déterminés à résoudre les affaires d’exploitation et d’atteintes sexuelles en cours d’examen.

L’envergure de la tragédie a été telle qu’il a fallu de nombreuses années pour retrouver un sentiment de normalité. Aujourd’hui, l’insécurité et la faible croissance économique contribuent à un durcissement des tensions sociales et à la détérioration de la situation humanitaire. J’exhorte les Haïtiennes et les Haïtiens à résoudre leurs différends par le dialogue et à résister à toute escalade qui pourrait compromettre les acquis de ces dix dernières années.

Le Bureau intégré des Nations Unies en Haïti et les 19 organismes, fonds et programmes présents dans le pays continueront de travailler en partenariat avec le peuple haïtien vers le relèvement et la prospérité.
Mesdames et Messieurs, chers collègues, chers amis,

Aujourd’hui, nous rendons également hommage à la mémoire des 102 collègues, originaires de 30 pays différents, qui ont perdu la vie en Haïti – la plus grande perte de l’histoire de l’ONU.

Je viens de me recueillir devant le monument émouvant, « A Breath », qui vient d’arriver de Port-au-Prince. Je remercie le sculpteur, Davide Dormino, et tous ceux qui ont aidé à transporter son œuvre. J’ai été particulièrement impressionné par l’inclusion de débris de l’hôtel Christopher, où tant de nos collègues ont péri.

Celles et ceux qui ont ainsi trouvé la mort étaient en Haïti pour instaurer la stabilité, favoriser la prospérité et consolider la paix et la sécurité, avec des partenaires internationaux, nationaux et locaux. Il y avait, parmi ces femmes et ces hommes, des conseillers en matière de politiques, des spécialistes des questions politiques, des travailleurs humanitaires, des spécialistes du développement, des agents de sécurité, des soldats, des avocats, des chauffeurs et des médecins.

Lorsque le séisme a frappé, de nombreux membres du personnel des Nations Unies ont pris part aux opérations de recherche et de secours et ont transporté des blessés dans le complexe des Nations Unies. Certains ont eu la tâche déchirante d’accompagner le corps d’un collègue défunt ou d’une collègue défunte auprès de ses proches, pour l’inhumation ou la crémation.

Une perte de cette ampleur laisse des souvenirs indélébiles et des cicatrices permanentes, que portent Haïti et l’ONU tous deux. Elle nous lie et jamais nous ne l’oublierons.

Aujourd’hui, nous renouvelons nos plus sincères condoléances aux familles et aux amis des victimes, ainsi que notre sympathie envers celles et ceux dont la vie reste touchée par cette tragédie.

Nous renouvelons également notre engagement à honorer la mémoire de celles et ceux que nous avons perdus, en œuvrant aux côtés du peuple et du Gouvernement haïtiens, et avec les amis et les alliés du pays dans l’ensemble de la communauté internationale.

Ensemble, nous allons préserver l’avenir d’Haïti et construire des vies de paix, de prospérité et de dignité pour toutes les Haïtiennes et tous les Haïtiens.

Kenbe fèm. [Bon courage / continuez.]

Merci.

Mesi anpil [Merci.]

Et maintenant, observons un moment de silence à la mémoire de ceux qui sont morts.