Ethiopia + 6 more

WFP Emergency Report No. 04 of 2000

Source
Posted
Originally published
This report includes: A) Ethiopia B) Djibouti - drought C) Democratic Republic of Congo D) Angola E) Zambia - airlift for Angolan refugees F) Colombia - war displaced G) Ecuador.
From Jean-Jacques Graisse, Assistant Executive Director. Available on the Internet on the WFP Home Page at http://www.wfp.org/ or by electronic mail from Deborah.Hicks@wfp.org or Natasha.Nadazdin@wfp.org (fax 39 06 6513 2854).

For information on resources, donors are requested to contact Aleesa.Blum@wfp.org or Marius.deGaayFortman@wfp.org at WFP Rome, telephone 39 06 6513 2004 or 06 6513 2250. The address of WFP is Via Cesare Giulio Viola 68, Parco dei Medici, 00148 Rome, Italy.

This issue of the Emergency Report was prepared by Natasha Nadazdin.

PART I - HIGHLIGHTS

(Details below in Part II)

A. ETHIOPIA

1. Update - information as of 26 January

a) FAO/WFP Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission report for 1999 published in Rome on 26 January 2000; Ethiopia's cereal import requirement for 2000 estimated at 764,000 (metric) tons, expected to be covered by food aid; Report estimates some 7.8 million persons will need food aid due to severe food shortages; recommended follow-up mission to assess next belg crop and finalize meher estimates for 1999 in April.

b) Full text of the Report to be available shortly at FAO home page http://www.fao.org go to Economics, then GIEWS, then select Special Reports and Alerts.

c) On 21 January Government of Ethiopia appealed for 899,000 tons of food aid to assist 8 million persons (including war-displaced).

d) Current WFP emergency operations: EMOP 6143 for victims of crop failure and EMOP 6080 for internally displaced populations; in addition, WFP provides food aid to Somali, Sudanese and Kenyan refugees in Ethiopia.

B. DJIBOUTI

1. Assistance to nomadic populations affected by drought

a) New WFP emergency operation (EMOP 6196) to assist nomadic populations affected by drought; from January through June, WFP to provide some 6,300 tons of food aid for 100,000 persons in the districts of Djibouti, Ali-Sabieh, Tadjourah, Obock and Dikhil at total WFP cost of USD 2.7 million.

C. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

1. Update - information as of 26 January

a) On 24 January WFP appealed for unimpeded access by humanitarian organizations to people in need of relief aid in D.R. Congo; WFP created a fourth corridor in south-east to feed IDPs in Northeastern Katanga and South Kivu.

b) To date, WFP emergency operation (EMOP 6110) launched last June received only 34 percent of full requirements.

c) On 24 January UN Security Council discussed implementation of D.R. Congo peace accord.

D. ANGOLA

1. Update - information as of 26 January

a) Security: On 24 January, three vehicles of demining NGO Halo Trust ambushed on Quilengues-Chongoroi road, Huila; three died and three injured.

b) WFP airlift operations: Kuito airport reopens on 27 January, after being closed for repairs; Government authorizes placement of a WFP-chartered aircraft at Lubito, which will facilitate deliveries to Balombo and Ganda.

c) General: WFP plans to deliver a total of 15,500 tons of food aid to approximately 1.1 million beneficiaries in January; in December WFP delivered some 4,200 tons of food and 1,020 tons of non-food items by air; some 6,100 tons of food and 40 tons of non-food items delivered by road.

d) On 22 January an inter-agency assessment mission visited Cangandala, south of Malange; some 10,500 IDPs will receive WFP food aid as of February.

E. ZAMBIA

1. Airlift for Angolan refugees - information as of 26 January

a) WFP-chartered aircraft continues airlifting food and refugees between Kalabo and Mongu in a joint WFP/UNHCR operation; some 1,200 refugees, out of total 7,000 in the area moved to Mongu from Kalabo.

F. COLOMBIA

1. Assistance to war displaced - information as of 26 January

a) A two-year WFP protracted relief and recovery operation (PRRO 6139) for 227,000 internally displaced persons in Colombia planned to start in February; WFP requirement is USD 8.9 million, while Government committed USD 11.1 million; WFP received no pledges as yet; donors urged to respond.

b) In attempt to exert pressure on Government for more support, IDPs took over UNHCR premises in 1999, and those of ICRC in January 2000; after a brief suspension, ICRC partially resumes assistance.

G. ECUADOR

1. General situation - information as of 26 January

a) WFP operations in Ecuador not affected by the political crisis of 21/22 January; WFP food stocks in Quito, used for its development projects, can be borrowed for an emergency situation; two WFP development projects currently active: support to school feeding and mother/child health and development.

b) Continuing concern at two active volcanoes threatening to erupt: Tungurahua and Guagua Pichincha; UN/NGO working group established to watch volcano situation.

PART II - DETAILS

A. ETHIOPIA

1. UPDATE - information as of 26 January

1.1 FAO/WFP Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission report

a) According to the FAO/WFP Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission report for 1999 published in Rome on 26 January 2000, Ethiopia's cereal import requirement for 2000 will be at some 764,000 (metric) tons, most of it expected to be covered by food aid. National cereal and pulse production is forecast at 10.72 million tons, 6 percent down from last year. The Report forecasts striking differences in food supplies during year 2000 between the normal deficit areas and the surplus-producing ones where crops are good (Gojam, Arsi, Wollega). It is estimated that some 200,000 tons of grain for food aid will be possible to purchase locally. Poor belg rains and a late start of the main rains (meher) resulted in poor land preparation, late planting, a reduction in planted area and heavy weed infestations. But the main rains were mostly heavy and well distributed, continuing well into October, thus benefiting late sown crops. A follow-up mission to assess the next belg crop and to finalize the meher estimates for 1999 is recommended for April.

b) The reduction in production from last year is most severe in Tigray (35 percent decline) but the southern region is also forecast to be down by 12 percent. Amhara region is 5 percent lower and Oromia is forecast at 1 percent lower than 1998. The greatest reduction is the 26 percent fall in sorghum production, with maize down 13 percent and barley slightly down.

c) The increased import requirement of 764,000 tons is expected to be covered almost entirely by food aid to support 7.8 million people affected by severe food shortages resulting from droughts, waterlogging and other weather related hazards.

d) The final FAO/WFP Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission report issued in Rome updates previous preliminary figures released in Adis Ababa. The full text of the Report will be available shortly at the FAO home page http://www.fao.org go to Economics, then GIEWS, then select Special Reports and Alerts.

1.2 On 21 January the Disaster Prevention and Preparedness Commission (DPPC) of the Government of Ethiopia released its relief appeal for 2000. Food assistance is requested for just over 8 million persons experiencing food shortages due to natural (primarily rain failure) and man-made factors (conflict with Eritrea). The food assistance requirement is estimated at approximately 899,000 metric tons, including food aid needs for people displaced by the conflict with Eritrea. In addition, assistance is requested by the Government to meet non-food requirements in various sectors.

1.3 The UN Country Team is expected to issue its consolidated appeal on 28 January.

1.4 Current WFP operations in Ethiopia:

a) WFP is currently implementing two emergency operations: EMOP 6143 for victims of crop failure and EMOP 6080 for internally displaced populations. In anticipation of the new UN appeal, WFP is currently preparing proposals for two new emergency operations, each to cover a nine-month period from April to December 2000.

b) Furthermore, WFP provides food assistance to Somali, Sudanese and Kenyan refugees in Ethiopia under its protracted relief operation (PRO 5241.03). In December, WFP with UNHCR and the Ethiopian Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA) provided approximately 3,550 tons of food assistance

to some 252,300 refugees.

B. DJIBOUTI

1. ASSISTANCE TO NOMADIC POPULATIONS AFFECTED BY DROUGHT

1.1 On 19 January WFP approved a new emergency operation (EMOP 6196) to

assist nomadic populations affected by drought. During a period of six months

from January through June, WFP will provide some 6,300 tons of assorted food

commodities for 100,000 persons. The total WFP cost for this operation is USD

2.7 million.

1.2 WFP food assistance is meant to support the Government's efforts to

improve the nutritional situation of the populations affected by drought, to

stop further degradation of living conditions and reduce massive migrations

from rural to overpopulated urban areas. A total of 100,000 persons in the

districts of Djibouti, Ali-Sabieh, Tadjourah, Obock and Dikhil are estimated

to need food assistance. Some 5,000 of them are children under five years of

age, pregnant women or nursing mothers who need supplementary feeding.

C. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

1. UPDATE - information as of 26 January

1.1 On 24 January WFP appealed for safe and unimpeded access by humanitarian

organizations to all people in need of food aid and other relief supplies in

D.R. Congo. WFP managed last week to create a fourth corridor in

south-eastern D.R. Congo to deliver food aid by barge to the town of Kalemie

from Kigoma, Tanzania, across Lake Tanganyika. This route will allow WFP to

feed IDPs in Northeastern Katanga and South Kivu. Vast areas of the country

still remain inaccessible to WFP and other aid agencies because of continued

insecurity.

1.2 Current WFP emergency operation (EMOP 6110) has received only 34 percent

of its full requirements. The operation was launched in June 1999 to provide

food assistance to 350,000 internally displaced and vulnerable persons at a

cost of USD 30 million. This emergency appeal will be extended and even more

food will be required.

1.3 The UN Security Council, at its session of 24 January, discussed the

implementation of D.R. Congo peace accord, signed in Lusaka in July 1999. The

UN commitment to support the peace process was confirmed, but the compliance

of the parties was said to be their primary responsibility. UN currently has

79 unarmed military liaison officers in the D.R. Congo, of the 90 authorized

by the Council. After the session, ten African presidents and foreign

ministers held a series of talks with the Secretary-General and Security

Council members on 25 January.

D. ANGOLA

1. UPDATE - information as of 26 January

1.1 Security:

a) On 24 January, three vehicles of the demining non-governmental

organization (NGO) Halo Trust were ambushed on the road Quilengues-Chongoroi

in Huila. Three people died and three were injured. Other ambushes of

vehicles were reported in the provinces of Huambo and Benguela.

b) Increased tension is reported south of Kuito Kuanavale, in Kuando

Kubango. Intense military movements continue on the Namibian border and in

many other areas of the province. UNHCR indicates that the number of Angolan

refugees in Namibia had increased to 9,000.

1.2 Airlift operations:

a) Kuito airport, closed for repairs since 14 January, reopened on 27

January. Although the airport was closed for a total of 19 days in January,

WFP distributions proceeded as planned, because necessary stock

pre-positioning had been made in December. Reopening of the airport will

facilitate future WFP deliveries to the area.

b) Last week, the Angolan Ministry of Transport authorized the placement of

a WFP-chartered cargo aircraft at Lobito airport. For the past two months,

only the pressing needs of beneficiaries attending nutritional and

therapeutic centres, school canteens and collective kitchens in Balombo and

Ganda could be covered by WFP through rotations of a small Beechcraft from

Catumbela. The nutritional situation of the population was rapidly worsening,

with a global malnutrition rate of 21.1 percent among internally displaced

persons (IDPs) in Ganda as reported by ACF. Larger quantities of food

commodities will now be transported to Balombo and Ganda.

1.3 General: WFP plans to deliver a total of 15,500 tons of food aid to

approximately 1.1 million beneficiaries in January. In the period 16-23

January, WFP has transported 625 tons of food and 21 tons of non-food items

by road. During the same period WFP delivered some 700 tons of food aid and

560 tons of non-food items by air, much below the average due to many

airports/airstrips being closed for repairs during the week. In December WFP

delivered some 4,200 tons of food and 1,020 tons of non-food items by air; in

the same period WFP delivered some 6,100 tons of food and 40 tons of non-food

items by road.

1.4 Malange: After the security assessment mission confirmed accessibility

to the municipality of Cangandala, south of Malange, an inter-agency

assessment mission composed of ten UN and NGO agencies and Provincial

Government Representatives took place on 22 January. The purpose of the

mission was to evaluate the type and degree of humanitarian intervention

required for the 10,500 IDPs concentrated in the municipality. The mission

concluded that food aid intervention was needed. The IDPs will receive WFP

food as of February.

1.5 Benguela - floods: Following the initial mission to Chongoroi on 17-18

January, another joint WFP/MINARS/UCAH/UNICEF mission travelled to Dombe

Grande on 20-21 January to assess needs of flood-affected population. WFP

will support 6,000 people who have lost their crops. WFP's support is

intended to be provided at least until the next harvest in August. Part of

the beneficiaries will be IDPs who worked on farms which are now flooded.

E. ZAMBIA

1. AIRLIFT FOR ANGOLAN REFUGEES - information as of 26 January

1.1 A WFP-chartered aircraft continued airlifting food and refugees between

Kalabo and Mongu in a joint WFP/UNHCR operation. More than seven thousand

Angolans have poured into Zambia in recent weeks to escape renewed fighting

in Angola. Many areas where refugees are have become inaccessible due to

floods. To date, some 1,200 refugees, out of the 7,000 estimated to be in the

area, have been moved to Mongu from Kalabo.

1.2 The humanitarian situation in Kalabo has improved but concerns remain

about the welfare of refugees in Sinjembela district on the border, an area

not safe for planes to fly into because of its proximity to conflict zones in

Angola.

1.3 The recent refugee influx brings the total arrivals since October to

20,930. It is estimated that there are at least 160,000 Angolan refugees in

Zambia.

F. COLOMBIA

1. ASSISTANCE TO WAR DISPLACED - information as of 26 January

1.1 The WFP protracted relief and recovery operation (PRRO 6139) for the

war- displaced population in Colombia is planned to start in February. On 17

January WFP and the Government signed a letter of understanding which sets

out the details of implementation. WFP requirement for this operation is USD

8.9 million, while the Government has committed USD 11.1 million. As of 20

January no pledges have been made by donors. WFP urges the donor community to

contribute.

1.2 The long-term objectives of PRRO 6139 are to alleviate the needs of the

displaced in Colombia (restore human capacity and enhance social cohesion,

support settlement, resettlement and return, facilitate reintegration into

society, mitigate the impact of future crises and contribute indirectly to

the peace process). The operation will serve 227,000 IDPs, with special

emphasis on women and children, over the period of two years.

1.3 Forced displacement has increased both in number of people displaced and

in total number of expulsion and host towns due to the intensity of the long

non-declared war and the attacks against the unarmed civil population. Most

vulnerable are women and children. Some 53 percent of the displaced are women

and girls and 32 percent of these women are heads of households. Some 70

percent of the displaced are children.

1.4 The Government's Social Security Network (Red de Solidaridad Social) is

providing cash grants, food aid and will give micro-credits with low interest

rates to IDPs.

1.5 In order to exert pressure on the Government to provide more support,

IDPs had taken over UNHCR premises in 1999, and those of ICRC in January

2000. They request credit for productive projects, resettlement, housing and

medical services. After a brief suspension, ICRC has partially resumed its

assistance.

1.6 On 13 January peace talks were resumed between the Government and the

guerrilla group FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) and further

contacts are being made with the National Liberation Army (ELN).

G. ECUADOR

1. GENERAL SITUATION - information as of 26 January

1.1 WFP operations in Ecuador have so far not been affected by the political

crisis of 21/22 January. The new President Gustavo Noboa, who was the

Vice-President in the previous Government, emphasized in his opening speech

to the Congress on 26 January that his Government will give priority to

social investments.

1.2 The political turmoil comes at a time when Ecuador is facing its worst

economic crisis of the last 50 years. All social indicators show a

deterioration in health and education fields. Poverty is affecting almost 50

percent of the population whose purchasing power has dramatically been

eroded. Unemployment is 17 percent.

1.3 WFP has food stocks in Quito, used for its development projects, which

could be borrowed if necessary in an emergency situation. WFP is currently

implementing two development projects: support to school feeding and

mother/child health and development. The latter is in its final phase and all

food has been delivered except for a last shipment of canned fish from Japan.

1.4 Two new WFP projects are being designed: a quick action project to

respond to the social emergency and another project to support the peace

process in the border area with Peru (a bi-national project with resources to

be shared by both countries). Each of these projects will have a food cost of

about USD 3 million.

1.5 There is continuing concern about two active volcanoes which are

threatening to erupt. One of them, Tungurahua, is located about 100 miles

from Quito. The area in the state of alert and populations have been

evacuated (emergency food assistance has been provided to these populations

from existing local resources). The second one, Guagua Pichincha, is in the

immediate vicinity of Quito, facing the city. Last year, the Quito area

experienced three major ash falls. A UN/NGO working group has been

established under the coordination of CARE to watch the volcano situation.

Note: all tonnage figures in report above refer to metric tons

(End WFP Emergency Report No. 04 of 2000 - January 27, 2000)