Cuba + 3 more

Latin America & The Caribbean Weekly Situation Update (26 September - 2 October 2022) as of 3 October

Attachments

CUBA: HURRICANE IAN

KEY FIGURES

100K+ HOUSES DAMAGED IN PINAR DEL RÍO PROVINCE

400K+ PEOPLE FACING WATER SUPPLY ISSUES IN LA HABANA

Preliminary reports estimate that Hurricane Ian affected more than 3 million people and left at least three dead as it ripped across western Cuba on 26 and 27 September. The most severe damages have been reported in infrastructure and buildings, including scores of houses, hospitals and schools, as well as agriculture, electricity and telecommunications services, with the provinces of Pinar del Río, Artemisa and the Special Municipality Isla de la Juventud being hardest hit.

After Ian’s impact, an islandwide blackout left the country’s approximately 11.4 million inhabitants without electricity. Power across the island is being gradually restored, although the process is expected to be more complicated in the worst-affected areas in the west. In the capital, La Habana, more than 400,000 people are currently facing water supply issues.

In Pinar del Río, the worst affected province, some 95 per cent of the population – more than 553,800 people – are still without electricity and it could take nearly three weeks to restore power across the province. More than 100,000 homes in Pinar del Río have suffered varying degrees of damage – around 60 per cent of houses in the province – with at least 228 households in evacuation centres still unable to return to their homes.

Across the province, more than 100 family health clinics, five hospitals and nearly two dozen other health facilities have been damaged. Pinar del Río is home to 75 per cent of the country's tobacco production – a key export for Cuba – and about 40 per cent of the nation’s bean production. According to news outlets, around 90 per cent of tobacco crops in 12,000 curing barns have been destroyed. The devasting impacts in the tobacco industry will deal a heavy blow to livelihoods, making early recovery and livelihood support critical response activities.

The Government of Cuba says it will cover 50 per cent of the costs for construction materials, water tanks and mattresses purchased by affected people, and bank loans or subsidies will be provided to those who lack the economic means to purchase these essential items. UN agencies are mobilizing pre-positioned relief supplies to support Government response efforts, including food, health and WASH-related items. Ian’s impact comes at a difficult moment for Cuba as the island continues to grapple with the compounding impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ripple effects of the war in Ukraine.

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.