CAR + 1 more

UNICEF Central African Republic Humanitarian Situation Report, 1 - 31 March 2016

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Highlights

  • Newly elected Central African President Faustin Archange Touadera was officially sworn into office on March 30, and named his former campaign director as his Prime Minister. The second round of legislative elections was conducted peacefully on March 31 with only a few minor incidents reported across the country.

  • The Population Movement Commission (CMP) set the total number of IDPs at 421,283 at the end of February 2016 as compared to 435,165 the previous month, or a decrease of 13,882 people (3%).

  • There has been an increase in security incidents against humanitarian actors in CAR, with a total of 11 incidents reported throughout the country in March.

  • More than 80 cases of sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) involving international forces and peacekeepers were reported in Dekoa in Kemo prefecture. UNICEF sent staff to conduct preverification of the allegations on 13-22 March and participated in inter-agency missions deployed to the area to assess available services, further substantiate the allegations and start providing response to victims.

  • Nearly 74,000 children received teaching and learning materials and over 500 school directors were registered in the EduTrac realtime data collection system.

  • In Bangui, water distribution and the drilling of boreholes allowed UNICEF to improve the access to water for 15,646 displaced persons.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

Newly elected Central African President Faustin Archange Touadera was officially sworn into office on March 30 and named his former campaign director as his prime minister. While he is working to form a new government, the overall electoral process is still ongoing: the second round of legislative elections was conducted on 31 March. Elections were conducted peacefully with only a few minor incidents reported across the country. Final results are expected to be released shortly.
During the reporting period, a sharp increase in incidents targeting public spaces (a grenade thrown in a small restaurant injuring 12 people including four UN agency staff) and IDP sites (three people injured in an armed attack against an IDP site with only the intervention of international forces preventing major damage) has been observed in Bambari. The latest violence has had a direct negative impact on the return dynamics that were observed in the area since the beginning of the year.

There has also been an increase in security incidents against humanitarian actors (NGOs): a total of 11 incidents were reported throughout the country in March.

Since December 2015, the slightly decreasing trend in the overall number of IDPs in the country has persisted. The Population Movement Commission (CMP) set the total number of IDPs at 421,283 as of end of February 2016 as compared to 435,165 the previous month, or a decrease of 13,882 people (3%). This reduction is mainly due to return movements observed in specific IDP sites located in the interior (Batangafo, Bouca, Kaga Bandoro), which is greater than the current displacement taking place in the northwestern and eastern part of the country.

In the northwest, in Ouham-Pendé, mounting tensions between communities in Paoua region were reported. Fighting linked with transhumance among armed elements continue in the west and northwest, forcing the displacement of local communities westwards towards Koui and Bocaranga.
UNHCR led an inter-agency mission to Bambouti in southeastern CAR (in Haut Mbomou prefecture, with a population of 950 people) to assess the situation of an estimated 8,000 South Sudanese refugees fleeing fighting in Western Equatoria.

The influx, which began in November 2015, is currently ongoing. From a humanitarian perspective, elements of concerns are: i) high number of refugees versus a small local population; ii) remote location with severe access constraints; iii) the absence of basic social services; and iv) the upcoming rainy season, which will further limit access to this remote area.