Burkina Faso + 6 more

West and Central Africa: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (18-24 January 2022)

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BURKINA FASO

MILITARY SEIZES POWER, 1.6M PEOPLE FLED ACROSS THE COUNTRY

On 24 January, the military made an announcement on state television saying it has seized power and overthrown President Roch Kaboré. An army officer declared that the deteriorating security resulted in the military takeover. Kaboré had been facing growing discontent over his inability to address non-state armed groups. His whereabouts are unclear, but the army officer declared that the detained persons are safe.

The coup comes a day after troops seized barracks, and gunshots were heard in the capital, Ouagadougou. The country is facing a fast-growing crisis and unprecedented levels of violence. Before the coup, the Humanitarian Response Plan pointed to some 3.5 million people in need of urgent assistance, but this number will likely rise as the intensification of violence continues to push tens of thousands of people into a humanitarian space. Over 1.6 million people have been forced to flee across the country, making it the largest caseload in the Central Sahel. Humanitarian organizations remains committed to stay and deliver lifesaving humanitarian assistance.

NIGERIA

ARMED GROUP KILLS TWO, ABDUCTS FOUR IN LATEST ATTACK IN CHIBOK LGA

On 20 January, non-state armed group (NSAG) operatives killed two civilians in Pemi village,
Chibok local government area (LGA), south of Borno state. They abducted four women during the raid, which temporarily displaced hundreds of residents, set ablaze houses and churches, and looted food supplies from homes and shops. This was the fifth attack in the last three weeks in which NSAGs have increased their attacks on civilian communities across southern Borno State.

CAMEROON

70,000 PEOPLE FLEE VIOLENCE AND CLASHES IN THE FAR NORTH

Since 5 December, inter-community clashes in the Logone Birni district, in the Logone et Chari division, Far North region, have prompted 70,000 people to flee, including over 35,000 seeking refuge in neighboring Chad. Clashes are also impacting people in the Mayo-Sava, Diamaré, and Mayo-Danay divisions where some displaced people are staying in makeshift shelters with limited access to water and health services, while others are being hosted by local communities. At least 44 people were killed, and some 120 villages were set ablaze during the clashes. Humanitarian organizations are mobilizing to provide assistance in camps located in Logone et Chari and Diamaré divisions, in response to the critical needs of internally displaced persons (IDPs). Meanwhile, about 1,800 IDPs have returned to their homes, despite the dire need for shelter.

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

CLASHES DISPLACE 756 IN THE HAUTEKOTTO PREFECTURE

On 16 and 17 January, clashes between armed groups near Aïgbando village, HauteKotto prefecture, forced 756 people to flee to Boungou 1 in the same prefecture. Several dozens of civilians were injured, and houses were looted and set ablaze during the clashes. Displaced people have diverse critical needs. Humanitarian organizations have mobilized to provide timely assistance.

NIGER

OVER 1,000 MALIAN MIGRANTS STRANDED

The closure of borders between West African countries and Mali as a result of the recent sanctions imposed by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) has had a severe impact on migration. Currently, 1,070 Malian migrants are stranded in Niger, unable to return home, awaiting authorization from Niger's Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation.
Humanitarian organizations supporting migrants reported that some are already experiencing uncertainty about their future, with psychosocial consequences.

Disclaimer

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.