Brazil

Brazil - Roraima Fires & Drought - LABR81

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Appeal
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Posted
Originally published


Brazil - Roraima Fires & Drought - LABR81
Appeal Target : US$ 374,379 ($100,000 Donated To Date)
- Total Project Value: US$ 1,633,379
Geneva, 15 May 1998

Dear Colleagues,

The state of Roraima in northern Brazil, situated along the border with Venezuela and the Republic of Guyana has been in a state of emergency due to the El Nino related drought and subsequent fires which have destroyed over 21% of the cultivated land. In addition to the destruction of crops, the indigenous people in Roraima are faced with critical problems in the drinking water supply of many villages. Rainfall has been irregular and the danger of continued drought is imminent, especially for the indigenous population that inhabits the area under cultivation, with its large fields of natural pasture where small herds of cattle are maintained that provide meat and milk to the communities.

As the pasture lands dried up, water courses became stagnant and the mosquitos that transmit malaria, and dengue fever - brought to the region by mine and timber workers - have affected indigenous people. In some villages 80% of the population contracted malaria.

ACT member, Coordenadoria Ecumênica de Servico (CESE- Ecumenical Service Coordination) has appealed to the ACT network for support to provide short term critical assistance in the Roraima region including relief food, agricultural seeds and the repair or development of drinking water sources. We request your urgent consideration of all possible funding and support for the vulnerable families affected by emergency in Roraima, Brazil.

Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

For further information, please contact:

ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (phone 41 22 791 6032 or mobile phone ++ 41 89 203 6055)
or
ACT Appeals Officer, Dirk Van Gorp (phone +41 22 791 6040)

ACT Web Site address: http://www.wcc-coe.org/act/

Rev. Myra Blyth
Director
WCC/Unit IV
Miriam Lutz
ACT Co-ordinator
Rev. Rudolf Hinz
Director
LWF/World Service
I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER INFORMATION

Coordenadoria Ecumênica de Servico - CESE (Ecumenical Service Coordination)

The Ecumenical Service Coordination (CESE), established in 1973, stands at the crossroads of relations between churches, social movements and international ecumenical aid agencies. CESE comprises five Protestant churches (Anglican Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist, Independent Presbyterian and United Presbyterian) and the Roman Catholic Church. CESE works throughout the country, with the Northeast and Northern Brazil as priority regions. It maintains its executive team in Salvador-Bahia, but also utilizes a network of collaborators in various parts of the country and consultants who take on particular tasks.

In terms of mandate, CESE is committed to the defence of human rights and to the affirmation of the full meaning of citizenship - going beyond civic rights and duties to include the full social and economic participation of all Brazilians. This includes those who often suffer from discrimination, such as Indigenous peoples and Afro-Brazilians, women in general, and the large number of children suffering abuse or at risk of it. Nationally, the highest priority is agrarian reform along with other issues affecting the poor rural population; but CESE is also concerned with the living conditions of the masses in the large urban centres, in an economic system that has for so long degraded the rural and urban environment and excluded much of the nation's population. CESE generally acts by facilitating the actions of community groups and the work done by NGOs and churches.

Through the Small Projects Fund (FPP), CESE makes "one-off" grants with the aim of encouraging and complementing the efforts of communities, popular organizations and support groups. Levels of funding vary according to the nature of projects, with most projects under US$6,000. The Fund has nine sub-programmes: Human Rights, Popular and Union Organization, Economic Development, Popular Health, Education, Culture, Church Renewal, Environment, and Emergencies. Other small projects are supported in the Programme for the Recovery of Lives (PRV) which evolved from its origins in a drought emergency to become a broader development programme.

As well as the work that relates directly to appraising, supporting and monitoring projects, CESE devotes a significant part of its human and financial resources to the promotion of contacts among groups and organizations, constructing alliances and discussing policies and priorities for action. CESE is also involved in international ecumenical networking and in educational and advocacy actions in the "North" that aim to extend international solidarity and make it more effective - to build what has been called an "international civil society".

II. IMPLEMENTING PARTNER INFORMATION

The Conselho Indígena de Roraima - CIR (Indigenous Council of Roraima)

The Conselho Indígena de Roraima (CIR, or Indigenous Council of Roraima) was legally established in December 1990. It is a non-profit organization which defends the rights and interests of indigenous peoples in the state of Roraima. It represents indigenous peoples of Roraima, is coordinated by Indians and emerges from a maturing process in the indigenous movement. The movement has been active since the 1970s in protecting the rights of indigenous communities throughout Brazil. CESE has been in partnership with CIR since its foundation by supporting small and specific project applications whose objectives were to maintain the organization, coordinate action by indigenous peoples in Roraima, and fund assemblies and events to implement and/or pressure for new public policies and against violations of constitutional rights.

III. DESCRIPTION Of The EMERGENCY SITUATION

Background - Overview

The state of Roraima is considered an area of national security because it is situated along the border with Venezuela and the Republic of Guyana. Indigenous people in Roraima have since 1990 been calling the state government’s attention to the need to supply water to villages. Rainfall has been irregular and the danger of drought imminent, especially for the indigenous population that inhabits the area under cultivation, with its large fields of natural pasture where the Indians maintain small herds of cattle that provide meat and milk to the communities. Fishing in this area is practically non-existent.

In the last two years, the rainy season, lasting from April to September, has brought insignificant rainfall as a consequence of El Niño. Since September 1997 some municipalities in the South of the state have suffered from drought. The pasture dried up, water courses became stagnant and the mosquitos that transmit malaria and dengue fever, brought to the region by mine and timber workers, have affected indigenous people. The impact on the Yanomami was especially heavy and in some villages 80% of the population contracted malaria.

In spite of the serious situation, Indians and small farmers continued to cultivate their fields in the hope that rain would fall at the right time. Traditional practice in the region is to burn small areas to clean the area to be planted. The drought conditions aggravated the fires, which spread out of control. However, there are signs that the major focuses of the fire were set by large landowners who wanted amnesty on agricultural credit they had obtained from local banks. The Federal Police in Roraima are currently investigating this allegation. The fire spread for four months. It was unfortunate that the state government declared a state of emergency only in January of this year. Although the President of Brazil had been duly informed, steps were not taken in time. The disaster became news only when the national and international press were alerted to the danger and the proportions of the disaster. In March the Roraima state government received help from a technical team from Argentina specializing in forest fires and from firefighters from the states of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Goiás. A rather rudimentary effort began to extinguish the fires. Fortunately, in the morning of March 31st, an unusually heavy rain fell steadily for six hours on the forest over the whole area affected by the fire.

A commission of federal congressmen, accompanied by representatives of the Ministries of the Army and the Environment, and a World Wild Life Fund representative, evaluated the situation. A UN commission also went to Roraima to study the situation and evaluate damage caused by the fire. Under pressure from the press and civic organizations, the Brazilian government agreed to accept help, after having initially refused financial aid from several international sources, including the World Bank and the UN on the basis that the fire was an issue of national sovereignty.

Description of Damages

In terms of the territory affected, there are various estimates. No study with any significant degree of reliability has yet been made. Official data from the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisa da Amazônia (INPA) estimates that 21.7% of the state’s cultivated land, pasturage and savannah was affected by the fire. According to INPA, this corresponds to 4% of Roraima’s total area. Damages are estimated at US$40 million. The fields comprise mainly cassava, maize and beans.
A total of 1,114 families, totalling 6,840 people, and 4,392 units of 0.25 ha. each have been affected.

Locations For ACT Appeal Response

Of the 182 indigenous communities in Roraima, the ACT/CESE-CIR project will work directly with 127.

IV. ACT APPEAL GOAL And OBJECTIVES

To provide short term emergency relief to the vulnerable indigenous people and other persons in the Roraima region who have been affected by the recent fires and drought. Assistance provided will include supplemental Relief Food, Food Security, Drinking Water Wells/Systems, and Medicine.

V. ACT APPEAL BENEFICIARIES

General Beneficiary Information

The drought and fire affected 182 indigenous communities in the state, belonging to the following tribes: Macuxi, Wapixana, Ingaricó, Taurepang, Yecuana, Wai-Wai, Waimiri-Atroari and Yanomami. Of the total of 38,600 Indians in the state of Roraima, 29,488 were affected by the drought and fire. About 19% of these are in a state of disaster (without water and food). There are serious cases of respiratory disease caused by inhaling smoke from the fire. The Wai-Wai were the least affected, as they are semi-nomadic. The Yanomami have been suffering from malaria and the situation has worsened with the fire.

Impact on Human Lives - deaths, dislocations, immediate needs for food, water and medicine. There have been no notifications of death. Dislocation occurred only among the Yanomami, who abandoned some fields and villages because of the smoke that reached the villages before the fire. The groups with the greatest need for food and water inhabit the cultivated area: Macuxi,Taurepang and Wapixana. Immediate assistance will be provided to villages in the cultivated region near Boa Vista, which was the most hard-hit.

The packages of food staples provided to the Yanomami will be made up of items that are part of their traditional diet and will be provided only to those being treated for malaria. Each family will receive assistance in proportion to the number of members.

Beneficiary Communities

Communities where water systems will be built or repaired

Region
Community
Family
Population
Water Mains
Serras
Flexalzinho
08
53
6,000 meters
Morro
30
186
4,000 meters
St. Liberdade
06
38
12,000 meters
Surumu
Machado
07
46
7,000 meters
S o Marcos
Curicaca
07
42
5,000 meters
Baixo Cotingo
Camará
30
180
7,000 meters
Total
88
545
41,000 meters
Communities that will benefit from artesian wells
Region
Community
Families
Population
Wells
Baixo Cotingo
Cararual
24
146
01
Constantino
13
74
01
Gavio
15
85
01
Raposa
Santa Cruz
49
298
02
Terrame
08
52
01
S o Marcos
Guariba
12
73
01
Ilha
15
93
01
Bala
09
71
01
Amajari
Uricuri
08
52
01
Três Coraçes
23
143
01
Mutamba
05
35
01
Taiano
Anta
15
90
01
Boqueiro
52
312
01
Livramento
10
61
01
Truaru
41
248
01
Serra da Lua
Marupá
33
194
01
Moscou
41
246
01
Manoá
70
425
01
Jabuti
26
158
01
Tabalascada
54
329
01
Total
523
3.185
21
Numbers of ACT/CESE-CIR Beneficiaries per Activity
  • Relief Food Distribution - 881 Families or 4405 persons for a 3 month period.
  • Food Security See Distribution - 881 Families or 4405 persons during a 3 month period.
  • Water Wells and Projects - 3730 persons in 26 Communities.

TOTAL ACT/CESE-CIR BENEFICIARIES = 12,540 Persons

VI. PROPOSED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE And IMPLEMENTATION

Description of Assistance

A Working Group was formed by CESE, CIR, the Diocese of Roraima and the Comiss o pela Criaço do Parque Yanomami (CCPY), in coordination with Oxfam-Recife. The group drafted a project entitled Campaign for Solidarity with Indigenous Peoples in Roraima Affected by the Drought and Fire, whose aim is to "propose emergency action to reduce the effects of the drought and fire on indigenous communities in the state of Roraima." Action programs encompassing a number of activities will be implemented in the areas of Food Security, Water Supply and Health. The Food Security program will distribute food staples, farm the land, reclaim areas by planting perennial crops, buy seeds, implements and pay for transportation; the Water Supply program aims to pay for technical services to advise on drilling artesian wells, building reservoirs and water mains; and the Health program will improve operation and services of village health posts, monitor malnutrition among the people affected, provide health workers to interact with indigenous nurses and traditional medical systems, and distribute medicine for malaria and prevention of infection of cuts and of insect and venomous animal bites.

The ACT/CESE-CIR appeal actvities comprise one part of the overall CIR project in the Roraima region. Additional food relief, food security, water and medical assistance is being implemented by CIR through the support of Oxfam, Caritas and ECHO. The ACT appeal projects are clearly identified and budgeted separately from the other donors and assistance. All partners and organizations are working in complete cooperation and coordination to address the overall emergency needs in the Roraima region.

Methodology

  • The ACT/CESE Project Officer, who has 15 years of experience working in the Amazon region has been working in Roraima with CIR and other supporting organizations since mid April 1998. The CESE Project Officer will continue to make monthly visits to Roraima to work with CIR and to monitor the ACT appeal projects.

  • A team was formed of Indians that represent the villages closest to Boa Vista to manage the purchase and distribution of merchandise. The team is supervised by the Campaign coordinator, Fr. Adalberto, of the Diocese of Roraima, and a bookkeeper.

  • The first purchase of food and seeds has been made and the products are stocked in two buildings belonging to CIR and the Diocese of Roraima. On 17 April, CESE provided $60,000 in funding from the initial donation of ACT member Christian Aid to begin emergency assistance.

  • Distribution to the villages will be by land, air or river transportation, according to optimum access to each community.

  • Oxfam will provide a water resource specialist for the Roraima Campaign, who will remain for a period of about four months. The Oxfam specialist is not directly supported by the ACT appeal budget, but will be of considerable assistance to the overall water resource projects, including those funded by the ACT appeal.

Implementation Description - Total Roraima Program Including ACT Appeal Projects
  • Distribute 11,693 packages of food staples to 3,524 families in 182 communities; 127 in the area where CIR is regularly active plus the other 55 affected areas (see table above).

  • Distribute 720 packages of food staples appropriate to the culture of the Yanomami, who are the most weakened and affected by malaria and unable to provide their own food.

  • Distribute cassava cuttings and bean, squash, rice and maize seeds to the Macuxi, Wapixana, Ingaricó and Taurepang Indians.

  • Supply fruit tree saplings to replant the areas affected.

  • Distribute agricultural implements to the Yanomami.

  • Build 22 artesian wells and install 22 water tanks in 21 indigenous communities from the following areas: Raposa Serra do Sol, Taiano, Amajari, Serra da Lua and S o Marcos.

  • Build 41 km. of water mains and 21 water tanks in areas near the mountains, to supply 6 communities.

  • Build 32 weirs in 8 regions.

  • Make it possible for health workers to visit areas affected.

  • Distribute weighing scales to 100 village health posts to monitor children s nutritional state.

  • Deliver malaria medicine and prevent infection of cuts and insect and animal bites (10,000 tablets of Mefloquine and 100 ampules of Polyvalent antiophidic serum).

VII. PROJECT ADMINISTRATION, FINANCE, MONITORING, REPORTING

Administration

ACT/CESE will have overall responsibility for the administration of ACT appeal activities. Day to day implementation and administration will be the responsibility of the CESE’s parter - CIR, who will be accountable to and supervised by the CESE Project Officer. Regular communications between CESE and CIR concerning all aspects of the ACT appeal project will be insured via phone, fax and Email. Additionally, the CESE Project Officer will travel to the Roraima region on a monthly basis to work directly with CIR and other project staff.

Financial Control

ACT/CESE will maintain overall responsibilty for the control and use of all ACT appeal funds. Funds will be provided to CESE’s partner - CIR, in accordance with submitted reports, verification of progress concerning ACT appeal projects, and the monthly monitoring visits by the CESE project officer. All financial systems and procedures will be in compliance with ACT policies. An external audit of all ACT appeal funds will be provided following completion of appeal activities.

Monitoring

Monitoring will be ensured through the monthly visits (approximately one week in length) to CIR in the Roraima region by the CESE Project Officer, who has 15 years of work experience in the Amazon region. Day to day monitoring of ACT appeal projects will be conducted by the CIR project staff through established mechanisms and procedures. These monitoring reports and other project information will be provided to ACT/CESE on a weekly basis.

Reporting

ACT/CESE will ensure all financial, narrative and statistical reporting is provided to the ACT Coordinating Office. Specific reports concerning only the ACT funded portions of the overall project will be provided in compliance with the ACT reporting guidelines. Additional general information concerning the overall program may also be included.

A mid term progress report on ACT appeal activities will be prepared by CESE-CIR during early July 1998 and submitted to the ACT Coordinating Office. Additionally, regular sit-reps and essential information will be informally provided throughout the appeal period by the CESE Project Officer.

Evaluation

ACT/CESE-CIR will conduct an evaluation of the ACT appeal assistance following the completion of the Appeal activities. This evaluation, including lessons learned, will be provided to the ACT Coordinating Office along with the final financial, narrative and statistical reporting requirements.

Details of Implementation Tasks

Distribution Team Tasks:

  • Ensuring that products arrive in the base centers on schedule;
  • Collecting reports on distribution of goods;
  • Presenting weekly reports;
  • Ordering goods to be delivered week in advance;
  • Coordinating delivery trucks and drivers;
  • Planning resources to ensure that food arrives at base centers every week;
  • Filling out forms and give them to truck drivers to be signed by those responsible at base centers (for control of shipment out of the warehouse and receiving of products at the base center). This form will be signed by the person responsible at each center and returned to the truck driver, who will return it to the person responsible for distribution;
  • Receiving and controlling distribution forms from each base center, signed by the beneficiary family;
  • Renting trucks when necessary;
  • Forecasting the quantity of products to be delivered during the week;
  • Requiring the relevant invoice whenever expenditures are made.

Storage Team Tasks:
  • Ensuring that stocks of merchandise are available in the warehouses as needed by the distribution team;
  • Maintaining daily control of receiving and shipping of merchandise;
  • Ensuring that trucks are loaded and unloaded according to schedule;
  • Supervising workers who load and unload trucks;
  • Requiring relevant invoices for all expenditures;
  • Presenting weekly reports on work done.

Purchasing Team Tasks:
  • Surveying product prices;
  • Deciding where and when to buy;
  • Signing delivery contracts with suppliers;
  • Maintaining constant contact with those responsible for the warehouses to see what is missing;
  • Informing coordinators of resources needed for purchase products a week in advance;
  • Requiring relevant invoices;
  • Presenting weekly reports.

Communications Secretariat Tasks:
  • Producing a weekly activities report to be distributed to the communities, related organizations and the general public;
  • Writing documents about CIR for the media.

Administrative Secretariat Tasks:
  • Providing general support to project teams;
  • Solving unforeseen problems;
  • Contributing to production of materials and activities reports to be distributed to the communities and the reports sent to funding agencies.

Financial Secretariat Tasks:
  • Producing the weekly financial report to be distributed in the communities, related organizations and the general public;
  • Producing daily accounts. CIR will ensure that weekly financial and activities reports will be made available to the communities and to the public in general and will adhere to the ACT Reporting Guidelines.

Base Centers:
  • Strategic places located in villages with a coordinator reponsible for distributing goods to families. The coordinator will fill out distribution and receiving forms, control the merchandise transported by truck, and sign the delivery notice.

VIII. IMPLEMENTATION TIMETABLE

This project is an emergency 5 month overall plan. The main part of the implementation by CESE-CIR in Roraima will occur during a 3 month period, with an additional 2 months for project assessment, set-up and reporting, closeout and evaluation matters.

ACT APPEAL PERIOD: 15 April 1998 - 15 September 1998

Activity
April/
May
June/
July
July/
August
Hiring company for artesian wells
X
Purchase of water tanks and PVC pipes
X
Purchase of food staples
X X X
Purchase of seeds and cuttings
X
Purchase of medicine
X
Transportation of food
X
X
X
Transportation of materials
X
Distribution of seeds and cuttings
X X
Construction of water mains
X X
Distribution of food staples
X X X
Purchase of flying time
X
Distribution of medicine
X
X
X
IX. COORDINATION

In addition to ensuring correct execution of the entire project, weekly meetings will be held by CIR and will include the Oxfam representative to evaluate the previous week’s work and to planthe tasks and resources needed for the week to follow.

A overall Coordinating Body composed of the general coordinators (CIR, the Diocese, CCPY and Oxfam) and by people responsible for distribution, storage and purchases and those responsible for the administrative and financial secretariats, will meet weekly to evaluate and plan activities.

X. APPEAL BUDGET

ESTIMATED APPEAL And PROJECT INCOME

Category/Description
Cash
Back Donor
In Kind
Total USD
ACT Network Donors
- Donation Received - Christian Aid
100,000
100,000
Other Project Donors
- Oxfam
136,000
136,000
- Oxfam/ECHO
332,400
332,400
- Movimundo/ECHO
332,400
332,400
- Mitterand Foundation/ECHO
332,400
332,400
- MSF/ECHO
110,800
110,800
- Caritas Brasila
15,000
15,000
Appeal & Project Income (As of 15 May 1998):
$ 1,359,000
PLANNED APPEAL & PROJECT EXPENDITURES
Category/Description
Type Unit
No. Units
Cost Real $
Other USD Budget
ACT USD Budget
CRISIS & POST CRISIS ASSISTANCE
Food Distribution 3 Months - Macuxi, Wapichana (3524 Families)
- Rice (20kg/mo)
kg
211,440
0,80
110,895
36,965
- Cassava (30kg/mo)
kg
317,160
1,00
207,996
69,332
- Oil (2kg/mo)
kg
21,144
1,30
18,020
6,007
- Salt (1kg/mo)
kg
10,572
0,50
3,466
1,155
- Beans (10kg/mo)
kg
105,720
1,00
69,310
23,103
- Dried Meat (5kg/mo)
kg
52,860
4,50
155,946
51,982
- Sugar (5kg/mo)
kg
52,860
0,65
22,526
7,508
Food Distribution 3 Months - Yanomani (20 Families)
- Rice (8kg/mo)
kg
2,880
0,60
1,510
- Cassava Flour (2kg/mo)
kg
720
1,0
629
- Beans (3kg/mo)
kg
1,080
1,0
944
591,242
196,052
Seed Distribution 3 Months - Macuxi, Wapichana (3,524 Families)
- Maize (10kg/mo)
kg
35,240
0,30
6,931
2,310
- Rice (3kg/mo)
kg
10,572
0,40
2,773
924
- Beans (5kg/mo)
kg
17,620
1,85
21,371
7,123
- Squash (1kg/mo)
kg
3,524
0,30
793
131
- Watermelon (1kg/mo)
kg
3,524
0,30
793
131
Seed Distribution 3 Months - Yanomani (20 Families)
- Maize (1kg/mo)
kg
120
0,30
31
- Watermelon (1kg/mo)
kg
120
0,30
31
- Squash (1kg/mo)
kg
120
0,30
31
- Fruit Tree Saplings (20kg/mo)
kg
2,400
0,60
1,259
34,013
10,619
Tools - Yanomani
- Machetes
ea
100
8,00
699
- Axes
ea
100
15,00
1,311
- 8" Lines
ea
100
4,00
350
- Hole Diggers
ea
100
10,00
874
- Fishhooks
ea
100
10,00
874
- Fishing Lines
ea
100
3,00
262
4,370
Artesian Water Wells
- Drilling 50 meter wells
ea
22
14,000
201,923
67,308
- Manual Pumps
ea
24
1,600
25,175
8,391
- Tools
ea
23
200
3,016
1,005
- Water Tanks
ea
23
500
7,539
2,513
- Cement
bag
70
8,00
368
122
Water Systems
- 65 Pipes
ea
667
20,00
8,746
2,915
- 50 Pipes
ea
1,334
16,00
13,993
4,664
- 40 Pipes
ea
1,000
14,00
9,179
3,059
- 32 Pipes
ea
2,667
9,00
15,737
5,245
- 25 Pipes
ea
667
5,00
2,186
729
- Water Taps
ea
35
7,00
161
53
- Valves
ea
30
15,00
295
98
- Water Tanks 3.01
ea
20
860
11,276
3,759
- Water Tanks 30.01
ea
1
8,000
5,245
1,748
- Connectors, Couplings, Etc
Lump
1
787
501
167
- Cement
Bag
60
8,00
315
105
Water Reservoirs
- 30x30x5 Weir
ea
32
1,000
20,979
6,993
326,634
108,874
Health
- Mefloquine 250mg
Pkg
10,000
1,20
10,490
- Antiophidic Serum
Amp
100
50,00
4,371
- Weighing Scales
ea
100
50,00
4,371
19,232
Other Assistance Projects
- To Be Designated-Not ACT
Lump
1
NA
168,049
Sub Total Direct Assistance:
$ 1,143,540
$ 315,545
MATERIAL TRANSPORT, STORAGE And HANDLING
Transport
- Truck Hire 3 Weeks (Food)
km
38,400
1,00
25,175
8,391
- Plane Hire (Food)
flight
15
1,300
12,784
4,261
- Plane Hire (Water)
flight
5
1,300
4,262
1,420
- Transport (Reservoirs)
km
25,600
1,50
25,175
8,391
Sub Total Transport, Storage, Handling:
$ 67,396
$ 22,463
ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS, SUPPORT COSTS
Staff Salaries - Roraima
- Accountant (1)
mo
3
1,680
3,306
1,100
- Warehouse Chief (2)
mo
3
1,200
2,360
787
- Staff Supervisors (2)
mo
3
840
1,652
551
- General Services Staff (16)
mo
3
3,840
7,553
2,517
- Drivers (2)
mo
3
960
1,888
629
- Cooks (2)
mo
3
840
1,652
551
- Secretary (1)
mo
3
420
825
276
- Press Officer (1)
mo
3
360
708
236
- CCPY Secretary
mo
3
480
944
315
Staff Salaries - CESE
- Project Officer (1 @ 33%)
mo
5
700
3,500
- General Administration Staff
mo
5
500
2,500
Vehicle Operations
- Diesel Fuel & Oil
Lump
1
19,050
12,490
4,163
- Tires
Lump
1
6,960
4,563
1,521
- Tire Tubes
Lump
1
840
550
184
- Vehicle Parts
Lump
1
3,600
2,360
787
- Repair Labor
Lump
1
6,000
3,934
1,311
Staff Travel - CESE Project Officer
- Airfare To Roraima
Rtrip
4
NA
4,800
- Housing & Meals
Trip
4
NA
1,400
- Travel in Roraima Region
Trip
4
NA
400
Communications - CESE Office
- Phone, Fax, Email
Mo
5
NA
1,500
Office Operations
- Office Expenses - Roraima
Mo
3
1,667
3,279
1,093
- Office Supplies - CESE Office
Mo
5
NA
250
Other
- Financial Audit Fees - ACT Projects
Lump
1
NA
3,000
- Evaluation Costs - ACT Projects
Lump
1
NA
1,000
- ACT Coord. Office Visits, Costs
Lump
1
NA
2,000
Sub Total Administration, Operations, Support:
$ 48,064
$ 36,371
TOTAL PROJECT EXPENDITURES:
$ 1,259,000
$ 374,379
Project Budget Summary
Total Appeal & Project Value (ACT & Other Donors)
$ 1,633,379
ACT APPEAL TARGET:
$ 374,379
Donations Confirmed (As of 15 May 98)
100,000
Backdonor Applications (As of 15 May 98)
Unconfirmed Pledges (As of 15 May 98)
Balance of Appeal Target Needed to Fund (Based on Above):
$ 274,379
APPEAL FACT SHEET

Appeal Number: LABR81

Appeal Name: Brazil - Roraima Fires & Drought

Date Issued: 15 May 1998

Project Completion Date: 15 September 1998

Project Description:

Provide short-term critical assistance to the victims of the El Niño related drought and subsequent fires in the State of Roraima, northern Brazil, along the border with Venezuela.

Fires caused the destruction of 21% of cultivated land, as well as problems of drinking water supply for many villages, added to this the irregular rainfall. As pasture land dried up, water courses became stagnant, bringing malaria and affecting up to 80% of the population in some of the villages.

ACT-CESE will provide relief food, agricultural seeds and repair or development of drinking water sources.

Implementing Partner
Activity Description

Appeal Target (USD)
ACT-CESE
Food and Seed distribution, tools, wells, water systems/reservoirs, health
315,545
Material transport
22,463
Administration and Support costs
36,371
TOTAL APPEAL TARGET: $ 374,379

Pledges can be communicated to ACT by using the Appeal Pledge Form

ACT - Action by Churches Together
Account Number: 102539/0.01.61
Banque Edouard Constant
Cours de Rive 11
Case postale 3754
1211 Genève 3
SWITZERLAND

APPEAL PLEDGE FORM

(Please fax to the ACT Co-ordinating Office - Fax:++41 22 791 6506)

Appeal Name: Brazil - Roraima Fires & Drought
Appeal Number: LABR81

Appeal Target: USD 374,379
Project Completion Date: 15 Sept. 1998

Contributing organization: ........................................
Telephone number:..............................

Contact person: ..........................................

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Signature
Date
1. Contributions to the ACT bank account: 102539/0.01.61
Amount
Expected
Other Details
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
and Source of Funding
eg Own Funds, Government, Other
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2. Contributions direct to an implementing partner:

Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Expected
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
.............................
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3. Applications to back donors - Governments, ECHO, etc:

Application
Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Made to
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
.............................
..........................
..........................
......................
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