Botswana + 2 more

Red Cross appeals for additional money as another cyclone threatens Mozambique

Source
Posted
Originally published
04/00 - Geneva. 3 March 2000
Hundreds of thousands of people are at risk as a third cyclone approaches Mozambique, warned the International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Cross Societies on Friday.

"Unless more money is given quickly, we are looking at a catastrophe," says Richard Hunlede, progamme manager for the appeal.

The International Federation is now appealing for 11.4 million Swiss francs to help Mozambique and its neighbouring countries, Zimbabwe, Botswana and Swaziland. They too are suffering from widespread flooding. An estimated 900,000 people in the region are now affected by floods and the death toll, already reaching several hundred, will
rise once rescue teams reach isolated areas.

The appeal, revised from 4.7 million Swiss francs reflects the growing scale of the disaster. The immediate priority remains the rescue of up to 100,000 people trapped by flood waters in Mozambique. But the money will also provide health care, shelter, clean water and sanitation and food for 85,000 people for seven months.

The Red Cross is also focusing on the prevention of an epidemic of cholera and other water-borne diseases. In Mozambique, it's working at several camps in Maputo and Gaza provinces. But throughout the country, the numbers of cases are already three to four times higher than normal.

The situation in the provinces of Gaza and Sofala will be aggravated with more water expected to sweep through into the country from overflowing rivers and lakes in neighbouring Zimbabwe and Zambia at the weekend.

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For further information or to arrange interviews please contact:
Jemini Pandya, Information Officer Tel: (41 22) 730 4214
Mobile : (41 79) 416 3881

The International Federation, the ICRC and the National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies together constitute the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

More information about the Federation can be found at www.ifrc.org, including photos and text Direct from the Field.