Bolivia

Bolivia: Preliminary results from impact assessment on floods/drought helps WFP target those most in need of food aid

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published


From WFP-ODM Emergency Situation Report 29 August 2001
The Ministry of Agriculture, with the support of WFP and FAO, is carrying out an impact assessment of the floods and drought that occurred during the first quarter of the year. The conclusion of the assessment has been delayed due to social unrest in the rural areas and a drastic reduction of the Ministry’s personnel (because of an institutional reform).

Preliminary findings, however, will help WFP in targeting those most at risk of food insecurity.

Department
Cultivated area destroyed (hectares)
Number of affected families
% Poverty
La Paz
7,730
9,897
70.80
Chuquisaca
2,825
1,279
77.00
Oruro
3,950
6,484
80.43
Beni
889
550
77.70
Cochabamba
3,153
9,621
71.10
Potosi
3,022
6,608
80.20
Santa Cruz
86,327
150
58.60
Pando
2,105
500
80.90
Tarija
570
559
66.60
TOTAL
110,571
35,648

If industrial crops produced by large and medium farmers, particularly in Santa Cruz, are disregarded, results indicate that some 39,799 hectares of crops produced by mostly subsistence farmers have been lost.

Most of the people affected by the massive flooding that broke a 58-year record live in the western part of the country (La Paz, Cochabamba, Potosí and Oruro), mainly in the highland plains (altiplano). This area shows the highest poverty incidence in the country, and in some municipalities more than 30% of the total population was affected.

Department
Municipality
% Poverty
La Paz Pucarani
96.6
Chacarilla
99.0
Oruro Corque
95.4
Salinas de Garci y Mendoza
98.3
Totora
91.1
Chipaya
93.8
Andamarca
97.4
Huachacalla
95.1
Sabaaya
92.1
Potosí Belen de Urmiri
97.8

Staple family food basket items have been hard hit by the disaster: potato (6,677 Has), maize (4,540 Has) and quinoa (2,167 Has). It is estimated that, in some regions, particularly in the highland plains, 20% of the potato crops has been lost. In other areas, where crops were cultivated on the riverbanks, crops were completely destroyed.

Since in the most affected region crops are cultivated only once a year (October to May), the next harvest is expected for May 2002. Until then, subsistence farmers who were significantly affected by the disasters will be in facing food insecurity.

WFP has focused its relief efforts in the areas of La Paz, Potosí, Oruro and Cochabamba. More than 23,000 families have been assisted with more than 1,000 MT of food, which was distributed immediately after the emergency for a period of approximately 30 days. However, further distributions have had to be called off due to shortage of food stocks.

In areas where the FFW development programs are active, affected families will be supported with regular resources and with the additional contribution of DFID Bolivia to Basic Activity 01. However, a large number of affected people not residing in this area remain without assistance.

This EMOP currently faces a shortage of 4,500 MT (wheat equivalent).