Bangladesh + 1 more

UNICEF Bangladesh Humanitarian Situation Report - 30 August 2017

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments

Situation in Numbers

358,602
# Children in need of humanitarian assistance

708,743
# People in need
(UNICEF projection according to inter-agency SitReps, MIRA and BBS census 2011)

UNICEF Appeal 2017
US$9.45 million

Highlights

  • Influx of Undocumented Myanmar Nationals (UMNs) has restarted following the attacks on the Myanmar Border Guard Police posts in the Rakhine state on 25 August 2017. According to the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) update, 18,445 people is estimated to have entered in Bangladesh as of 30 August 2017. The ISCG will be sharing a response plan with donors with a forecasted caseload of 120,000 new influx.

  • For the pre-existing UMNs, UNICEF requires US$20.7 million to implement its 2017-2018 response plan for Rohingya children. For 2017 alone, UNICEF is seeking US$9.45 million to address the needs of Rohingya children and their families. Considering the renewed influx, it is expected that funding requirement will be increased.

  • An estimated 12,276 ( 58.5%) out of a targeted 20,979 Undocumented Myanmar Nationals (UMNs) children aged 4-14 years, both pre-existing and newly arrived, have access to basic non-formal education in all makeshift settlements.

  • 10,263 children (44 %) out of a targeted 23,500 have access to recreational and psychosocial support. Out of 325 targeted unaccompanied and separated children, UNICEF assisted in reunifying 40 with their families.

  • A total of 35,734 children (87%) out of a targeted 41,072 from both UMNs and host communities were screened for malnutrition. A total of 103,611 Children aged 9-59 months were vaccinated against Measles and Rubella (MR) in makeshift settlements and hard-to-reach host communities. 15,200 (29.8%) people out of targeted 51,000 have access to safe drinking water and 9,700 people were provided with improved sanitation facilities against a target of 25,000.

  • 17,450 (34.22%) people out of targeted 51,000 have access to safe drinking water and 9,700 people were provided with improved sanitation facilities against a target of 25,000.

  • UNICEF continues to lead sectoral coordination in Nutrition, Child Protection (more commonly known as Child-Centred Care in Cox’s Bazar) and co-leads in Education with Save the Children. Though UNICEF leads the WASH cluster at national level, the NGO Action against Hunger (ACF) leads the sub-national sector in Cox’s Bazar.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

As of 30 August, it is estimated that 18,445 Undocumented Myanmar Nationals (UMNs) have entered in Bangladesh following attacks on the Myanmar Border Guard Police posts in the Rakhine state.1 The new influx families are either in open air or staying with relatives or other known people. Gathering in ‘no-man’s land’ also continued from the inside of Rakhine State. Stranded people at the border have made temporary shelters in no-man’s land in between Tumbru and Gundum border at the ‘0’ line. Thousands of people have been there for more than three days. 90 per cent of the new arrivals are children, women and the elderly. It is reported that the new arrivals are traumatized, frightened, tired and require immediate humanitarian assistance.

The new influx of 18,445 Rohingya adds to the previous influx of 74,000 from last October 2016, coupled with another 300,000-500,000 of pre-existing Undocumented Myanmar Nationals (UMNs), and 32,000 registered Rohingya refugees. Cox’s Bazar district of Bangladesh is confronted to a dire humanitarian crisis. The district is one of the most vulnerable districts, not only for its poor performance in child-related indicators but as well for its vulnerability to natural hazards.

To address the on-going humanitarian needs of the Rohingya population in Bangladesh, UNICEF seeks US$20.7 million to provide Child-Centred Care (Child Protection), Education, Nutrition, WASH and Health support to 358,602 children for two years through direct interventions and by strengthening local governance systems. The response includes life-saving needs for the new influx, recovery support and medium-term development activities including resilience to natural disasters. Considering the renewed influx, the humanitarian needs is expected to increase.