Rohingya influx overview: Key changes during 2018 monsoon season

Report
from Assessment Capacities Project
Published on 25 Oct 2018 View Original

Monsoon Impact

The monsoon season in Bangladesh runs from June to September, preceded and succeeded by cyclone seasons, running from April to May and from October to November.

Primary data available from March, before the beginning of the first cyclone season in 2018, and from July, midmonsoon, allows for a first analysis of the impact of the cyclone/monsoon season so far.

Notable changes between March and July include:

• a decrease in navigability within the camps
• changes in the perception of safety concerns regarding shelters, with refugees being increasingly concerned about unstable structures and landslides
• increased problems accessing water and latrines.

To date, over 55,000 Rohingya refugees in the camps have been affected by incidents related to the monsoon/cyclone season. Out of 246,000 refugees at risk of landslides, 26,400 have been relocated.

The Basic Needs Gap Index illustrates that needs vary greatly across the camps, with some areas being more affected than others by gaps in key sectors.

Overview

The monsoon season in Bangladesh runs from June to September, preceded and succeeded by cyclone seasons, running from April to May and from October to November.1 Primary data available from March, before the beginning of the first cyclone season in 2018, and from July, mid-monsoon, allows for a first analysis of the impact of the cyclone/monsoon season so far. Notable changes include a decrease in navigability within the camps, changes in the perception of safety concerns regarding shelters, and increased problems accessing water and latrines.

During the peak monsoon months of June and July, the monthly average rainfall in Cox’s Bazar is 802.38mm and 915.45mm, respectively (ACAPS 19/03/18). The worst rains in Cox’s Bazar occurred on 25 July, when 463mm of rain fell in a single day. Between 22 July and 10 August, 979mm of rainfall were recorded (ISCG 25/08/2018).

This period of increased rainfall is not reflected in data from NPM round 11, as data collection ended on 22 July. In total, since mid-May to date, over 55,000 refugees have been affected by cyclone/monsoon-related incidents 2 such as landslides. Over 6,000 were displaced. One person was killed and 55 were injured (ISCG 15/10/2018).

The impact of the monsoon goes beyond Cox’s Bazar. As in most years, rainfall and flooding have been reported across the country, affecting hundreds of thousands of people. In July, various districts including Sylhet in the northeast Rangamati and Khagrachhari in the southeast, as well as Kurigram, Lalmonirhat, and Jamalpur in the northwest, were affected by flooding, with 100,000 people affected in Sylhet alone (Dhaka Tribune 05/07/2018, 08/07/2018; ACAPS 21/05/2018).

As of NPM Round 11, collected in July 2018, mid-monsoon, the camps with the highest basic needs index are Camp 20E, Nayapara RC, and Camp 5 (see Table 1). The camps with the largest populations with high basic needs are Camp 5, Nayapara RC, and Camp 8E. Map 1 shows the distribution of basic needs gaps at the level of majhee blocks to highlight variations within camps. The index takes into account indicators that measure people’s access to health, water, sanitation, food and shelter/NFI services and supplies (see Methodology section for an overview of all indicators).