Monsoon Floods: Bangladesh Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT) - Situation Report N. 2 (as of 4 September 2017)

Report
from UN Resident Coordinator for Bangladesh
Published on 04 Sep 2017

This report is produced by the Humanitarian Coordination Task Team (HCTT) of Bangladesh in collaboration with humanitarian partners. It covers the period from 28 August to 3 September 2017. The next report will be issued on or around 11 September 2017.

Highlights

• Torrential monsoon rains have affected almost 40 million people in the entire South-Asia region including Bangladesh, India and Nepal. At least 1,200 people are known to have died, with thousands of houses, schools and hospitals destroyed.

• In Bangladesh, an estimated total of 101,683 houses are reported to have been destroyed and 619,834 have been partially damaged; 145 persons are known to have lost their lives due to the floods.

• The Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR) informs that 172 shelters in flood-affected areas are sheltering more than 46,000 people.

• Access to the most affected areas in the northwest continues to remain a challenge as roads are either severely damaged or submerged under flood water. It is estimated that around 11,000 km of roads, 500 bridges and culverts have been damaged.

8 million Affected people Affected Districts

145 Dead

101,683 Houses Destroyed

619,834 Houses Damaged

172 Shelters

Situation Overview

As of 3 September, the Government of Bangladesh reports that the floods have affected 32 districts in the northern, north eastern and central parts of the country due to the overflowing of the Brahmaputra-Jamuna river, affecting a total of more than eight million people. As water moves down toward the Bay of Bengal, several low-lying central areas have become inundated, such as Manikganj, Faridpur, Rajbari, Tangail, Madaripur, Comilla, and Shariatpur.

However, some of the most affected districts remain in the northwest. An estimated 101,683 houses are reported to have been destroyed and 619,834 are believed to have been partially damaged by the floods, while 145 people are known to have died. The Ministry of Disaster Management and Relief (MoDMR) has reported that as of 3 September, 172 shelters in flood-affected areas are sheltering more than 46,000 people.

Access to the most affected areas in the northwest continues to remain a challenge as roads are either severely damaged or submerged under flood water. It is estimated that around 11,000 km of roads, 500 bridges and culverts have been damaged. Nearly 100 km of rail lines, especially in the northwest districts of Dinajpur, Rangpur, Lemonhead, Gurugram and Thurman, have been damaged severely by the floods. Several dams have been damaged or broken. Many sluices and regulators are no longer functioning, and around 796 km of embankments have been eroded. Floods bring a risk of landslides in the hilly regions of Sylhet and the Chittagong Hill Tracts. Floods also exacerbate the ongoing risk of river erosion. With water level going down in the Jamuna, erosion has damaged 30 meters of the village protection embankment on the eastern side of Bangabandhu Multipurpose Bridge at Gorilabari in Tangail's Kalihati Upazila. Four unions in Jajira Upazila and Shariatpur, are under threat of river erosion.

Similarly, three unions under Noria Upazila are at risk, where at least 3,135 families have already lost their homes since the beginning of August.

According to the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) a total of 483 community clinics have been inundated/damaged countrywide. The Health Emergency Operation Center of the DGHS is reporting 12,370 cases of Acute Watery Diarrhea, 659 of Respiratory Infection, 366 of Skin Disease and 173 Eye Infections, registered in health centres of affected Upazilas.

HCTT partners are scaling up the emergency response in the flood-affected northern and central parts of Bangladesh. On 1 September 2017, the HCTT launched an Emergency Response Plan to complement the timely and effective response by the Government of Bangladesh. The plan is seeking USD $12 million to provide immediate humanitarian assistance to 330,000 people (45 per cent men, 55 per cent women, 51 per cent children) (66,000 HH) for the next 6 months (August 2017 – January 2018), primarily in the six most affected districts: Gaibhandha, Dinajpur, Kurigram, Amalpur, Nilphamari and Sirajganj.