Bangladesh + 1 more

Humanitarian crisis management programme: Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh - Situation Report #12: Fire incident (22 March - 12 April 2021)

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published
Origin
View original

Damage and loss

61,191 PEOPLE AFFECTED

12,413 SHELTERS DAMAGED

1,611 COMMUNITY FACILITIES DAMAGED

1,517 WASH FACILITIES

54 DAMAGED LEARNING CENTRES DAMAGED

16 CHILD FRIENDLY SPACES DAMAGED

13 DEATHS

563 PEOPLE INJURED

45,122 PEOPLE DISPLACED

Response highlights till date

203,000 litres of drinking water provided

2,224 people received emergency medical support

32,032 people received psychological first-aid

94,194 meals provided for lunch and dinner

287 separated children reunited with their parents

Overall humanitarian context and needs

The fire in the Rohingya camps has forced families to abandon their houses and seek shelter elsewhere. The populations affected have spent the last four years rebuilding their lives. They lost everything in the fire and are currently living in makeshift tents and temporary community centres.

As a response partner, BRAC has been providing emergency assistance and protection to 60,000 people of the Rohingya community who lost their shelters and belongings in the fire. BRAC has also supported 150 families of the host community with temporary shelter items. The ongoing recovery phase still requires repairing and renovating infrastructures and shelters, ie the WASH facilities, healthcare services, and children and women-friendly spaces. There are still critical needs for relief items for families affected. Moreover, protection items like night lights are still limited that restricts mobility among women and girls. Safety measures at the temporary facilities and the fire debris still scattered across the camps also need to be addressed urgently.

The populations affected have been through immense trauma from the fire incident. Four other small fires broke out in the camps after 22 March 2021, heightening the state of fear and anxiety amongst the camp dwellers. In addition, the COVID-19 impacted mobility of humanitarian actors and increased health risks among both the populations affected and the humanitarian workers. More rigorous disaster preparedness, risk mitigation, ecological restoration, and close monitoring of the forecasting of any rapid changes in the situational weather need to be considered for future response planning and programming.