Argentina

Argentina El Niño Floods - LAAR81

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published


Appeal Target : US$ 285,300
Geneva, June 22, 1998

Dear Colleagues,

Strong storms and abnormally heavy rains during April 1998 attributed to the El Nino Phenomenon have caused severe flooding in the northern regions of Argentina, particularly the Provinces of Entre Rios, Santa Fe, Corrientes, Misones, Chaco and Formosa. Torrential rains reached historic levels in many areas and caused the evacuation of thousands of families, as well as major damages to the agricultural sector and community infrastructure. According to government estimates, over 75,000 persons have been displaced by the flood waters and 290,000 persons have been affected.

ACT member, Federation of Evangelical Churches of Argentina (FAIE) has provided assistance to an estimated 3000 flood victims during the crisis phase of the emergency through it’s emergency committee (CEPE). Food, clothing and other materials were donated from member churches and related institutions and distributed throughout the flood regions. Church World Service (CWS) also donated $20,000 of blankets. Now that the flood waters have receded, FAIE-CEPE has appealed for ACT funding and support to implement a rehabilitation and reconstruction project which will target the critical needs of the vulnerable indigenous and Creole (mestizo) victims of the flooding. Staff from the ACT Coordinating Office has recently visited with FAIE-CEPE in Argentina to assist with needs assessment and program planning. We request your immediate consideration of all possible funding and support for these families. Please kindly send your contributions to the ACT bank account.

For further information, please contact:

ACT Co-ordinator, Miriam Lutz (phone 41 22 791 6032 or mobile phone ++ 41 89 203 6055)
or
ACT Appeals Officer, Dirk Van Gorp (phone +41 22 791 6040 or mobile phone ++ 41 79 433 0592)

Rev. Myra Blyth
Director
WCC/Unit IV
Miriam Lutz
ACT Co-ordinator
Rev. Rudolf Hinz
Director
LWF/World Service
I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER

Argentina Federation of Evangelical Churches (ACT/FAIE-CEPE)
- Ecumenical Committee for Emergencies -

II. IMPLEMENTING ACT MEMBER INFORMATION

FAIE (Argentina Federation of Evangelical Churches): FAIE is the ecumenical federation of various Churches in Argentina, and participates within the National Council of Evangelical Churches (CNCE), which also includes the Council of Pentecostal Churches and the Council of Free Evangelical Churches.

FAIE membership includes 25 denominations including WCC and LWF member churches:

  • Disciples of Christ
  • The Church of God
  • United Evangelical Lutheran Church
  • Evangelical Church Rio del la Plata
  • Evangelical Waldensian Church
  • Christian Bible Church
  • Evangelical Methodist Church
  • Anglican Church

CEPE (Ecumenical Committee for Emergencies): CEPE is the established mechanism within the FAIE structure to work with member churches and local partners during emergencies. CEPE members include representatives from the Disciples of Christ, Methodist, Church of God, Biblical Christian, and Evangelical Rio del la Plata Churches. CEPE’s local partners include the United Mission Council, the United Board of Missions, the Argentine Commission for Refugees, and Indigenous Peoples Organizations, as well as local churches and ecumenical structures.

During May 1998, CEPE joined with the Association of Evangelical Churches (ASIERA) and the Confederation of Pentecostal Churches (CEP) to form a national coordinating committee to coordinate and provide assistance to flood affected families.

III. DESCRIPTION Of The EMERGENCY SITUATION

Background

Beginning in late 1997 the Northwest and coastal region of Argentina have suffered heavy rain, hurricane-force winds and hail as a result of the El Nino phenomenon- The La Plata valley rivers rose to record levels, causing large-scale flooding. The main rivers affected in Argentina were the Parana and Uruguay, which flow south from Brazil and Paraguay. Other large rivers in the Northwest are the Bermejo, the Pilcomayo and the Negro. Between November and December 1997, the effects of the El Nino phenomenon appeared to be under control. But in March 1998 the rain and flooding increased, and in April the government declared the entire northeast region in a state of emergency. Also in April, there was unusually heavy rain in the Chubut province of Patagonia, where in a few hours the rainfall exceeded the annual average. The river Chubut burst its banks and flooded a number of areas including the city of Trelew.

During the initial crisis phase of the El Nino flood emergency, FAIE-CEPE has been providing and coordinating assistance - including food, clothing, medicines and blankets - in the Entre Rios, Chaco, and Santa Fe provinces. Funding and support has been provided by member churches, Church World Service (CWS), and private contributions.

Current Situation - Damages - Impact On Human Lives

The effects of the El Nino phenomenon have declined and the weather improved during May in the Northwest and the coastal regions. River levels fell markedly, and official figures now indicate the following situation as a result of the Nino phenomenon:

Chaco Province: The hardest-hit cities were Resistencia and Barranqueras. Evacuees at the height of the crisis numbered 17,500. Currently evacuees number 5727, mainly women and children. Earthen embankments are being raised to strengthen the Gran Resistencia river defense system. Further into the province, while there has been no major flooding, heavy rain has destroyed the cotton crop, which should have been harvested in April. Approximately 8000 indigenous people and small holders have been left without their chief means of survival. The few animals they possess - goats, cattle and pigs - are suffering epidemics.

Formosa Province: The hardest hit city was Formosa and approximately 6000 persons were evacuated. Out in the province, the marshlands around the River Bermejo, which provide the indigenous people with hunting and fishing grounds, have been flooded, and the strong current makes hunting and fishing impossible. Most of the cotton crop has also been destroyed.

Santa Fe Province: The hardest hit cities include Santa Fe, Santo Tome, and Reconquista. 18,400 persons were evacuated In the north of the province, but some people have now been able to return to their homes. Most of the sorghum, soya bean, rice and vegetable crops have been lost. Livestock has also been lost. The small land owners have been the most affected.

Misiones Province: 600 persons living near the riverside were evacuated in Posadas. The river level continued to rise during May in Puerto Iguazu. Forecasts are expecting situations similar to those along the course of the River Parana.

Corrientes Province: This is one of the areas hardest-hit by the rise in the river levels and heavy rains. The worst-affected cities include Corrientes, Goya, and Paso de la Patria. 15,000 persons were evacuated and considerable areas of the countryside have been flooded and the highways cut off. The government has promised loans for farmers.

Entre Rios Province: This area has also been badly flooded by the Rivers Parana and Uruguay. It has become a series of islands with isolated populations. 18,293 persons have been evacuated. The most damaged cities include La Paz, Gualeguaychu, and Villa Paranacito. The situation in the countryside is similar to that in Corrientes. The small land owners have lost their crops and livestock.

Buenos Aires Province: The hardest-hit area was the Delta - the mouth of the Rivers Parana and Uruguay. The population is now cut off on a series of islands. Approximately 300 persons were evacuated in the Delta zone. In the areas surrounding the cities of Campana, San Nicolas, Zarate, San Pedro, there are another 1300 people who have been displaced.

Patagonia - Southern Argentina Coast: The worst hit cities include Terlew, Rawson, Puerto Madryn, and Gayman. Several of these are on the banks of the River Chubut, which overflowed following heavy rain. The city of Trelew was flooded in a few hours, following rainfall equal to the annual average. Some of the poorer quarters of the city was largely destroyed and roads in the city have also been damaged.

Patagonia - Highlands: Early snowfall in the River Negro and Chubut provinces has cut off small rural villages and indigenous communities, which live mainly from wool production from their now reduced sheep flocks and from a small amount of cattle. Weather forecasts indicate a harsh winter. This will further isolate the communities, which will not be able to exchange their products for food or firewood, the only fuel they use. Children and old people are those who are suffering most.

Disaster and Emergency Statistics

Estimated Damage in the Northwestern and Coastal Regions of Argentina

  • 280,000 people directly or indirectly affected.
  • Approximately 700,000 people have been evacuated from their homes. Some have now returned as the weather improves, but flood damage to their homes and farms means they must start again in other areas.
  • Floods have covered 8 million hectares of farmland, which produced chiefly cotton, tobacco, rice, sunflower and vegetables, and grazing for livestock.
  • Those persons suffering the worst damage in the countryside are the indigenous persons and small land owners.
  • Losses of over $2 billion USD are estimated in the region.
  • 20 lives were lost. The number of deaths was kept to a minimum as a result of the efforts of emergency prevention networks set up by the authorities and civil society.

Locations for ACT Appeal Assistance
  • Chaco Province
  • Santa Fe Province
  • Entre Rios Province
  • Patagonia

IV. ACT APPEAL GOALS
  • Provision of Crisis Phase emergency assistance including food, blankets, clothing, hygienic items, household essentials and medical materials to vulnerable flood victims.

  • Provision of Post Crisis Phase emergency assistance including seeds, agricultural/food security inputs, housing repairs, and water/sanitation system repairs for vulnerable flood victims.

  • Provision of training, information and other emergency preparedness measures.

V. ACT APPEAL BENEFICIARIES

Number, Type and Location Of Beneficiaries

Beneficiaries will fall into two overall categories - Directly Affected and Indirectly Affected. The ACT appeal assistance will address the needs of both groups equally.

  • Directly Affected Beneficiaries: Will be those families actually displaced by the heavy rains and flooding, and who have suffered considerable damages to housing and agricultural lands.

  • Indirectly Affected Beneficiaries: Will be those persons and families whose vulnerability has increased due to the heavy rains and flooding. These are predominately Women Head of Households, Children, Day Labourers, Elderly, and Indigenous persons.

Chaco Province = 2700 Estimated Beneficiaries
  • 50% Rural Indigenous Population
  • 25% Rural Population
  • 15% Semi Urban Population
  • 10% Urban Population

Santa Fe Province = 900 Estimated Beneficiaries
  • 60% Rural Population
  • 40% Urban Population

Entre Rios Province = 1350 Estimated Beneficiaries
  • 40% Rural Population
  • 60% Semi Urban Population

Patagonia Region = 900 Estimated Beneficiaries
  • 40% Urban - Costera Population
  • 60% Cordillera Population

Total Estimated ACT Appeal Beneficiaries: 5850 Persons

Criteria To Be Utilized In Beneficiary Selection

Directly Affected

  • Vulnerable Families Whose Homes Were Damaged
  • Vulnerable Small Landowners Whose Agricultural Crops or Animals Were Lost

Indirectly Affected
  • Vulnerable Women Head of Households
  • Vulnerable Malnourished Children
  • Vulnerable Persons Suffering From Illness
  • Vulnerable Pregnant Women
  • Vulnerable Unemployed Day Labourers
  • Vulnerable Elderly Persons
  • Vulnerable Indigenous Persons

VI. PROPOSED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE And IMPLEMENTATION

Description of Assistance

ACT/FAIE-CEPE will provide assistance to the poorest urban and rural populations in areas where there are ecumenical churches and entities who are members of FAIE. This aid will be given on a short term and one time basis only and will go to families or groups which have not received help from the state or other civil society organizations.

Emergency Preparedness

  • Pastoral and community organization for emergency and post-emergency stages.
  • Printed training materials, information and videos concerning emergency.
  • Training of community and/or pastoral agents in prevention, organization and addressing emergencies.

Health
  • Workshops on preventing and treating diseases caused by the emergency.
  • Provision of pharmaceutical and traditional folk medicines.
  • Rehabilitation of the physical and emotional health of groups and people affected by floods, storms, snowstorms, etc.

Urban and Semi Urban Areas
  • Provision of supplemental food, clothing, blankets, medicines, household items, hygiene items.
  • Rehabilitation & Repair of housing and water/sanitation systems.
  • Temporary Shelters for children, unemployed, pregnant women, and the elderly.
  • Income generation projects for unemployed vulnerable flood victims.

Rural Areas
  • Provision of supplemental food, clothing, blankets, medicines, household items, hygiene items.
  • Rehabilitation & Repair of housing and water/sanitation systems.
  • Repairs and rehabilitation to farm infrastructure
  • Provision of seeds and fruit trees.
  • Restocking of food producing animals (sheep, goats, pigs, poultry, beekeeping)
  • Animal husbandry workshops: cattle - care of common parasites and diseases.
  • Income generation projects for unemployed women and day laborers.

FAIE-CESE Implementation Partners Per Region

Chaco Province

  • United Mission Council
  • Evangelical Church Rio del la Plata & Agencies
  • Disciples of Christ
  • United Lutheran Church
  • United Board of Missions
  • Church of God

Santa Fe Province
  • Evangelical Waldensian Church & Agencies
  • Evangelical Methodist Church & Agencies

Entre Rios Province
  • Christian Bible Church
  • Evangelical Waldensian Church & Agencies

Patagonia Region
  • Evangelical Methodist Church & Agencies
  • United Lutheran Church

VII. PROJECT ADMINISTRATION, FINANCE, MONITORING, REPORTING

Project Administration

The overall project administration will the responsibility of CEPE as directed by the CEPE Coordinator - Ms. Mabel Filippini and working through the established structure and board. The president of FAIE - Pastor Emilio Monti will provide additional oversight and assistance. A secretary located in the FAIE-CEPE office in Buenos Aries will provide project support. Day to day administration and project management will be accomplished through 3 regional coordinators to be hired by FAIE-CEPE during the appeal implementation period.

Project Finance Management and Controls

Financial management and control will centralized and will be provided by the CEPE Coordinator and an accountant located the FAIE-CEPE offices in Buenos Aries.

Project Monitoring

Monitoring of ACT appeal assistance will be insured through procedures established by the CEPE Coordinator, regional project coordinators, and the implementing churches and agencies in targeted regions and communities.

VIII. IMPLEMENTATION TIMETABLE

6 Months ( 01 July - 31 Dec 1998)

IX. COORDINATION

FAIE-CEPE is working in coordination with the National Council of Evangelical Churches, the Council of Pentecostal Churches, and the Council of Free Evangelical Churches. Additional coordination is accomplished through consultative discussions and meetings with government, community and civil defence authorities in the flood affected regions.

X. APPEAL BUDGET

ANTICIPATED APPEAL And PROJECT INCOME

Category/Description
Cash
Back Donor
In Kind
Total USD
ACT NETWORK DONORS
Confirmed Donations or Pledges
Applications And Considered
OTHER DONORS
Confirmed/Unconfirmed Donations
Total Anticipated Income To Date:
PLANNED APPEAL EXPENDITURES
Category/Description
Type Unit
No. Units
Unit Cost USD
Total USD Budget
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
- Training, Information, Materials
Lump
1
5,000
5,000
CRISIS PHASE ASSISTANCE (Food, Non Food, Medical, Hygiene, Other)
Chaco Province
- Rural Indigenous
Lump
1
7,500
7,500
- Rural Other
Lump
1
3,500
3,500
- Urban Lump
Lump
1
1,500
1,500
- Semi Urban
Lump
1
2,500
2,500
Santa Fe Province
- Rural Lump
Lump
1
3,000
3,000
- Urban Lump
Lump
1
2,000
2,000
Entre Rios Province
- Rural Lump
Lump
1
3,000
3,000
- Semi Urban
Lump
1
4,500
4,500
Patagonia Region
- Urban Costera
Lump
1
2,000
2,000
- Cordillera
Lump
1
3,000
3,000
POST CRISIS ASSISTANCE (Food Security, Housing Rehab, Water/Sanitation)
Chaco Province
- Rural Indigenous
Lump
1
50,000
50,000
- Rural Other
Lump
1
25,000
25,000
- Urban Lump
Lump
1
10,000
10,000
- Semi Urban
Lump
1
15,000
15,000
Santa Fe Province
- Rural
Lump
1
20,000
20,000
- Urban Lump
Lump
1
10,000
10,000
Entre Rios Province
- Rural
Lump
1
20,000
20,000
- Semi Urban
Lump
1
25,000
25,000
Patagonia Region
- Urban Costera
Lump
1
10,000
10,000
- Cordillera
Lump
1
20,000
20,000
242,500
TRANSPORT, WAREHOUSING, HANDLING
Truck, Vehicle, Other
Lump
1
15,000
15,000
CAPITAL EQUIPMENT(FAIE-CEPE Office)
Computer/Printer/Software/Modem
Each
1
4,000
4,000
PERSONNEL, ADMINISTRATION, OPERATIONS, SUPPORT
Project Staff Salaries & Benefits
- Regional Coordinators (3)
Mo
6
650
11,700
- FAIE-CEPE Accountant
Mo
6
250
1,500
- FAIE-CEPE Secretary
Mo
6
250
1,500
Project Staff Travel
- Coordinating & Monitoring Trips
Mo
6
500
3,000
Office Operations
- Office Supplies
Mo
6
100
600
Communications
- Telephone, Fax, Email
Mo
6
250
1,500
Financial Audit
- External Final Audit
Lump
1
3,000
3,000
Coordinating Office
- Staff Visitation, Assessment
Lump
1
1,000
1,000
23,800
TOTAL APPEAL EXPENDITURES:
$ 285,300
APPEAL FACT SHEET

Appeal Number: LAAR81

Appeal Name: Argentina El Nino Floods

Date Issued: 22 June 1998

Project Completion Date: 31 Dec 1998

Project Description:

  • Provision of Crisis Phase emergency assistance including food, blankets, clothing, hygienic items, household essentials and medical materials to vulnerable flood victims.
  • Provision of Post Crisis Phase emergency assistance including seeds, agricultural/food security inputs, housing repairs, and water/sanitation system repairs for vulnerable flood victims.
  • Provision of training, information and other emergency preparedness measures.

Implementing Partner
Activity Description
Appeal Target (USD)
FAIE-CEPE
Emergency Preparedness, Crisis & Post Crisis Assistance, Transport
257,500
FAIE-CEPE
Capital Equipment, Personnel, Admin, Operations & Support Costs
27,800
TOTAL APPEAL TARGET: $ 285,300

Pledges can be communicated to ACT by using the Appeal Pledge Form

ACT - Action by Churches Together
Account Number: 102539/0.01.61
Banque Edouard Constant
Cours de Rive 11
Case postale 3754
1211 Genève 3
SWITZERLAND

APPEAL PLEDGE FORM

(Please fax to the ACT Co-ordinating Office - Fax:++41 22 791 6506)

Appeal Name: Argentina El Nino Emergency
Appeal Number: LAAR81

Appeal Target: USD $ 285,300
Project Completion Date: 31 Dec 98

Contributing organization: ........................................
Telephone number:..............................

Contact person: ..........................................

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Signature
Date
1. Contributions to the ACT bank account: 102539/0.01.61
Amount
Expected
Other Details
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
and Source of Funding
eg Own Funds, Government, Other
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2. Contributions direct to an implementing partner:

Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Expected
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
Transfer Date
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3. Applications to back donors - Governments, ECHO, etc:

Application
Implementing
Appeal
Amount
Made to
Partner
Component
(indicate currency)
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