Angola + 5 more

WFP Emergency Report No. 15 of 2000

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published
This report includes: A) Horn of Africa drought: Ethiopia and Djibouti B) Angola C) Mozambique D) East and Central Africa: Burundi and Democratic Republic of Congo.
From Francesco Strippoli, Senior Humanitarian Advisor. Available on the Internet on the WFP Home Page at http://www.wfp.org/ or by e-mail from Natasha.Nadazdin@wfp.org . For information on resources, donors are requested to contact Aleesa.Blum@wfp.org or Marius.deGaayFortman@wfp.org at WFP Rome, telephone 39 06 6513 2004 or 06 6513 2250. Media queries should be directed to Trevor.Rowe@wfp.org telephone 39 06 6513 2602. The address of WFP is Via Cesare Giulio Viola 68, Parco dei Medici, 00148 Rome, Italy.

PART I - HIGHLIGHTS
(Details below in Part II)

A. HORN OF AFRICA - DROUGHT

1. Ethiopia - information as of 14 April

a) UN special envoy to Horn of Africa Catherine Bertini currently visiting the region.

b) Some 60 percent of cereal requirements of WFP drought operation pledged; further quantities pledged by donors through NGOs; over 200,000 tons borrowed by various agencies from the Emergency Food Security Reserve (EFSR) over the last few months.

c) WFP pipeline adequate to meet needs until July, except for blended foods; lean period begins in June, together with summer rains that may render many roads impassable; WFP urgently needs food deliveries for timely pre-positioning of food aid stocks before rains.

d) Due to delayed belg rains, belg crops will not be harvested in time to prepare land for meher crops.

e) Pastoral areas in critical condition; gu rains expected at the end of March have not started; WFP chairs coordination meetings and watches food security situation in Bale and Borena zones of Oromiya region.

f) WFP preparing a budget revision for the current drought operation to accommodate increasing food aid requirements.

2. Djibouti

a) WFP approves operation to repair road between the port of Djibouti and the Ethiopian border at the WFP cost of USD 3.8 million; port of Djibouti the only one used for food aid shipments for Ethiopia; another WFP operation to improve port infrastructure in Djibouti already under way.

B. ANGOLA

1. Update - information as of 12 April

a) Kuito airport: WFP may have to suspend food deliveries to Kuito due to deteriorating condition of landing strip; in the city over 200,000 people depend on WFP food aid; necessary quantities cannot be shipped by road due to insecurity and state of bridges; current stocks sufficient for two weeks; WFP currently prioritizing distribution only to most vulnerable; local authorities indicate serious repairs cannot be made before the end of rains.

b) Total shortfalls for WFP operations from April to September expected to amount to 18,838 tons; further announcement of large contributions needed to avoid breaks in the pipeline.

c) On 7 April WFP passenger air service receives a new contribution of USD 1 million which allows it to continue.

d) Security situation in Angola remains tense; inter-agency security meetings now held on daily basis at WFP Luanda with the participation of WFP,OCHA, UNICEF and the UN Field Security Officer (UNFSO).

C. MOZAMBIQUE

1. Update - Cyclone Hudah - information as of 10 April

a) An OFDA/WFP/INGC/DFID evaluation mission flew to Zambezia province affected by cyclone Hudah; localized flooding caused some damage to infrastructure; food rations will be needed for a short period for those directly affected - between 1,000 and 2,000.

b) WFP looking for resources for air assets to remain in operation until end April - currently funding available only until 22 April; after departure of Spanish and Portuguese aircraft, air assets reduced to 28 aircraft, 18 helicopters and 10 fixed wing aircraft.

c) Over 1,400 tons of WFP commodities delivered during the week by air, boat and road to affected provinces of southern and central Mozambique.

D. EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA: BURUNDI AND DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

1. Burundi - information as of 13 April

a) An inter-agency mission, including WFP, visited 11 regroupment sites in Bujumbura Rural province identified for dismantling; of 23 sites claimed to be dismantled, five fully dismantled, two partially; security in some areasnot sufficient for safe return.

b) Government announced second phase of dismantling involving nine sites hosting about 125,000 people by end April, security permitting.

c) Peace talks in Arusha resumed on 10 April; UN special envoy for the Great Lakes region Berhanu Dinka met with President Pierre Buyoya on 12 April.

2. D.R. Congo - IDPs in South Kivu - information as of 11 April

a) A number of inter-agency field missions undertaken in South Kivu end March - beginning April; humanitarian agencies examining ways to prevent food shortages by providing food aid to IDPs and host populations where necessary.

b) WFP travelled to Kabare and Walungu to prepare food distribution for IDPs from Kalonge, Bunyakiri and Sabunda.

c) Humanitarian access expanded north of Bukavu to Kalehe, Nyabibwa, west of Ninja, south-west of Burhinyi and south to Uvira.

PART II - DETAILS

A. HORN OF AFRICA DROUGHT: ETHIOPIA AND DJIBOUTI

1. ETHIOPIA - information as of 14 April

1.1 The UN special envoy to Horn of Africa Catherine Bertini is currently visiting the drought-stricken Ethiopia to assess how UN can further support the Government in its effort to assist drought-affected populations. During her stay in Ethiopia, the WFP Executive Director Bertini met the Ethiopian Prime Minister, observed the humanitarian situation and the logistical problems of supplying the country's food aid needs this year.

1.2 To date, some 56 percent of cereals and 29 percent of blended food requirements have been pledged of the global annual food needs for Ethiopia. While donor response to the WFP emergency operation (EMOP 6218) has been generous (as of 11 April over 60 percent of the cereal requirements have been pledged), bilateral donor support to the Government has been relatively poor (some 51,000 metric tons). In addition, approximately 84,000 metric tons have been pledged by donors through international NGOs. Over 200,000 tons have been borrowed by various organizations from the Emergency Food Security Reserve (EFSR) over the last few months, however, only about 17,000 tons of this have been repaid. Given anticipated repayments, the stock of the EFSR is expected to be approximately 300,000 tons by August.

1.3 In general, WFP resources in the pipeline are adequate to meet needs until July with the exception of blended foods. At the same time stocks in the EFSR are expected to be approximately 300,000 metric tons and will possibly be used for borrowing. However, the lean period begins in June, with the onset of summer rains that may render many roads impassable. Therefore WFP urgently needs food deliveries for timely pre-positioning of food aid stocks before the rains.

1.4 The Government's Disaster Preparedness and Prevention Commission (DPPC) has planned to purchase 100,000 tons of food, but to date contracts have been awarded for 73,000 tons, out of which approximately 5,000 tons have been delivered.

1.5 Rainfall:

a) There is now a general consensus that the belg rains have failed. In addition, the rains expected at this time in the pastoral areas have not yet started. Consequently, needy populations will be requiring assistance for a longer duration than originally planned.

b) Most belg producing areas received rainfall in the last week of March after delays of four to six weeks. Given these minimal rains, crop production prospects remain low due to late onset of rains and hence delayed harvest. Where belg is the only harvest, if crops are not harvested in June or early July, the main rainy season (meher) will cause water logging, difficulties with harvesting and therefore spoilage of crops. In areas where there are both belg and meher harvests, it will not be possible to harvest belated belg crops in time to prepare the land for meher crops. However, the current rains will contribute significantly to pasture and replenishing drinking water both for human consumption and livestock.

c) The pastoral areas, particularly the Somali region and the lowlands of Bale and Borena of Oromiya region continue to be in critical condition. Gu rains which are expected at the end of March have not started. WFP has been chairing coordination meetings with NGOs. WFP is also participating in a group formed to follow the food security situation in Bale and Borena zones of Oromiya region. In these areas, the top priorities remain appropriate water and health interventions and supplementary food. To this end, WFP has dispatched a 10,000-gallon bladder for Denan, one of the worst affected areas in the Somali region, and 6 locally produced 5000-liter plastic tanks to, Gudhis, another area similarly affected in Somali region.

d) As rains are late, WFP is revising its contingency plans and sharing them with other agencies to prepare for the possible increase in needs in the event that belg and gu rains fail. Furthermore, a budget revision to the current drought operation is being prepared to accommodate increasing food aid requirements.

1.6 WFP has put together a number of proposals to request additional donor financing for nutritional surveys, upgrading of transportation infrastructure to improve accessibility to badly affected areas thereby facilitating the delivery of relief assistance, and funds to transport non-food items.

2. DJIBOUTI

2.1 WFP has recently approved a special operation to repair the road connecting the port of Djibouti with the Ethiopian border at the WFP cost of USD 3.8 million. The port of Djibouti remains the sole port of entry for goods destined for Ethiopia, as the Ethiopian Government does not accept to use the port of Assab, Eritrea. Before the start of the border conflict between Ethiopia and Eritrea in May 1998, 85 percent of Addis Ababa's international trade passed through the Eritrean port of Assab. To get their food supplies to the people who desperately need it, the UN agencies can only use Djibouti -- and to a lesser extent Berbera. WFP has already started its support to the rehabilitation of the port infrastructure in Djibouti.

B. ANGOLA

1. UPDATE - information as of 5 - 12 April

1.1 Kuito airport:

a) WFP may have to suspend food deliveries for lack of access to the city of Kuito where over 200,000 people depend on WFP survival rations. Up to now, the only safe and reliable means to deliver food to the city has been by airlift. The deteriorating condition of the landing strip makes it increasingly unsafe for aircraft to land and take off and there is no other feasible alternative for transporting food into the city. The minimum monthly food requirement of beneficiaries in Kuito is 3,000 tons. WFP has tried to transport by road, but the security conditions and the state of the bridges makes it impossible to deliver the necessary quantities. The only viable alternative is to repair the landing strip in Kuito.

b) Current WFP food stocks in the city will last no more than two weeks. Unless the airport is not repaired within that period of time, it will be impossible to distribute full monthly rations to the 203,000 beneficiaries due to receive food at the beginning of May. WFP has already begun to prioritize distribution of the increasingly scarce food supplies to only the most vulnerable people.

c) The local authorities have indicated that serious repair works would not be effected until the rain season is over. On 12 April, WFP representatives met with ENANA, the Angolan company in charge of airports and air navigation, to discuss runway conditions and urge for a speedy repair of the runway. In March, a total of 85 percent of the WFP distribution plan was covered. With the further deterioration of the runway, only 60 percent of the needs are expected to be covered in April, even if road transport to Kuito can be used.

1.2 The runways of several other airports are in a bad condition, namely Huambo, Negage, Luena, Kuito Kuanavale. From 1 to 5 April, WFP Angola has delivered a total of 1,245 tons of food commodities and 52.4 tons of non-food items by air. From 1 - 4 April, WFP Angola has transported 88 tons of food products by road.

1.3 Kwanza Norte: Last week, following the attack of Calulo (Kwanza Sul), massive displacements of population occurred to Dondo, approximately 60 km North East of Calulo, in Kwanza Norte Province. According to the latest figures provided by World Vision International (WVI), 10,321 IDPs from Calulo have now been verified and registered in Dondo. Making use of stock reserves in Dondo and in N'dalatando, WFP was able to meet the immediate food needs of these displaced at full rations for this month.

1.4 Namibe: Last week, representatives from the Catholic Relief Services (CRS) and WFP visited Camucuio, Cassimbas, Lola and Namibe to register the 8,763 IDPs already assisted by WFP and the IDPs recently arrived in those locations. The registration exercise is needed as CRS, WFP's implementing partner in Namibe since 1 April, has taken over this responsibility from MINARS.

1.5 Total shortfalls from April to September are expected to amount to 18,838 tons, the major shortfalls being cereals and pulses, 16,321 tons and 1,699 tons respectively. In view of the time which elapses between a confirmation of contribution and the actual arrival of the commodities in country, announcement of large contributions are therefore needed now to avoid such imminent breaks in the pipeline.

1.6 On 7 April, the Office of the Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID) confirmed a contribution of USD 1 million for the WFP Special Operation ANG 5857.01 Passenger Air Service used by most of the humanitarian aid community to travel inside Angola.

1.7 The security situation in Angola remains tense and continues to limit humanitarian movements. As of 12 April, inter-agency security meetings are being held on a daily basis at WFP Luanda with the participation of WFP, OCHA, UNICEF and the UN Field Security Officer (UNFSO). Weekly security reports will be prepared by the UNFSO for the Security Management Team.

C. MOZAMBIQUE

1. UPDATE - information as of 9 April

1.1 An OFDA/WFP/INGC/DFID evaluation mission flew to areas affected by the cyclone Hudah in Zambezia province on Sunday, where they met with the Government representatives of Zambezia province. Localized flooding had affected some stretches of road but there was no permanent damage and they will be accessible once the water dries up. It was not felt that there would be any need for extended free food distribution in the area, maybe some rations for a short period for those directly affected. It was estimated that between 1,000 and 2,000 people might have been affected. WFP will continue to monitor the situation with local authorities.

1.2 Cyclone Hudah first made landfall briefly in Moma district in Nampula province on 7 April before it continued southwards finally coming onshore at Pebane in northern Zambezia province. It moved northwards and dissipated over Nampula province during the night of 8 April. Coastal areas were affected by strong winds and torrential rain.

1.3 After the departure of the Spanish and the Portuguese aircraft, air assets are now reduced to 28 aircraft, 18 helicopters and 10 fixed wing aircraft. WFP is making efforts to raise resources to allow the air assets to remain in operation until the end of April. At current levels and with current funding, the air-cell can run until 22/23 April. Efforts are also being made to obtain a more detailed timetable of road rehabilitation from the Government of Mozambique, in order to better plan delivery by truck.

1.4 Over 1,400 tons of WFP commodities were delivered during the week by air, boat and road to the five affected provinces of southern and central Mozambique. WFP has delivered over 7,400 tons of food since the beginning of the flood response.

D. EAST AND CENTRAL AFRICA: BURUNDI AND DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

1. BURUNDI - information as of 13 April

1.1 WFP participated in a four-day inter-agency evaluation mission conducted in the 11 regroupment sites in Bujumbura Rural province which had been identified for dismantling. The objective was to review the extent to which sites had been dismantled and to assess the needs of the population concerned. Of the 23 sites claimed to be dismantled, five are fully dismantled, two partially. In the rest, security situation on the hills of origin does not permit a safe return at this time.

1.2 The Government announced a second phase of dismantling to be carried out throughout April involving nine sites hosting about 125,000 people. In a press conference recently held by the President, it was reported that he estimated all the regroupment sites would be dismantled within two months. However, it was also reported that the agenda planned for the second dismantling plan could be modified due to bad security situation in some areas of Bujumbura Rural province.

1.3 A follow-up meeting for the ninth round of talks in Arusha resumed on 10 April under the mediation of the international mediator for Burundi Nelson Mandela. UN special envoy for the Great Lakes region Berhanu Dinka met with President Pierre Buyoya on 12 April and joined in peace talks during his two-day visit to Burundi.

2. D.R. CONGO - IDPs IN SOUTH KIVU - information as of 11 April

2.1 A number of inter-agency field trips took place in the third week of March in Kaziba in order to assess the condition of internally displaced persons and to determine the most adequate humanitarian action. On 28 March, another inter-agency mission, lead by the UN Humanitarian Coordinator, travelled to Kalehe, an area with a great potential for agricultural production, hosting more than 16,000 IDPs and risking to face food supply problems. The humanitarian agencies are examining the ways to prevent food shortages by providing food aid to IDPs and to the host population where necessary. WFP will support the agricultural production in this area, the results of which should be felt also in the neighbouring areas.

2.2 On 6 April, a WFP team travelled to Kabare and Walungu to prepare a food distribution for the IDPs from Kalonge, Bunyakiri and Sabunda.

2.3 Over the recent weeks, humanitarian access has been expanded north of Bukavu all the way to Kalehe, Nyabibwa (120 km), west of Ninja (100 km) and south-west of Burhinyi (80 km) and south to Uvira (135 km). ICRC has distributed half-rations of food, and some non-food items in some of these areas since the access was gained. Security in Uvira and more southwards remains a concern, as well as in the area of the Upper and Middle Plateau.

2.4 WFP has planned to distribute food aid to 40,000 IDPs each month, mainly along the Bukavu-Nyabibwe road, beginning in April.

Note: all tonnage figures in this report refer to metric tons

(End WFP Emergency Report No. 15 of 2000 - April 14, 2000)