Angola

Humanitarian Action for Children 2021 - Angola

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published
Origin
View original

Attachments

HIGHLIGHTS

  • An estimated 1.6 million people in Angola are facing food and nutrition insecurity due to climate shocks. Projected normal to below normal rainfall in the northwest and increased chances of above normal rainfall in the southeast will negatively impact the population, in terms of their health and nutrition and access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), education and child protection services.

  • Health emergencies, including polio, cholera and the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic will increase humanitarian needs and deepen the complexity of the situation in Angola in 2021.

  • UNICEF's humanitarian action in Angola will include the provision of essential drugs, vaccines, nutrition and WASH supplies and infection prevention and control support; as well as education, child protection, gender-based violence and communication for development services, including risk communication and community engagement.

  • UNICEF is appealing for US$14.3 million to respond to humanitarian needs in Angola in 2021.

HUMANITARIAN SITUATION AND NEEDS

An estimated 1.6 million people in Angola are facing food and nutrition insecurity due to climate shocks. Given the poor rainfall projections for 2020/2021 – normal to below normal rainfall in the northwest and increased chances of above normal rainfall in the southeast – Angola is at heightened risk of flooding and resulting population displacement, loss of crops, reduced household income, limited humanitarian access and increased risk of waterborne diseases, including diarrhoea and cholera. As a result, the food and nutrition security situation is likely to deteriorate in parts of the country.

Overall, the 2021 humanitarian outlook is complex. More than 38,000 children under 5 years need treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM); over 702,000 people affected by emergencies are expected to need access to water; over 346,000 people will need sanitation; and nearly 187,000 will need hygiene promotion support. Angola is also prone to health emergencies such as measles, malaria, yellow fever, cholera, malaria and polio, with confirmed outbreaks of circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2. As of September 2020, Angola was responding to seven outbreaks, with 142 cases of vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2, including 124 circulating cases.

In addition, the COVID-19 pandemic is severely impacting the country. By the end of September 2020, there were nearly 4,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19 (nearly 2,400 active), 152 deaths and 715 people in institutional quarantine. Nearly 92 per cent of cases (nearly 3,700) are in Luanda province. The pandemic is undermining service delivery capacities in the health, education, child protection, nutrition, WASH and other socio-economic sectors, and as a result, liming continuous access to these services, including gender-based violence prevention, risk mitigation and response. Due to COVID-19-related school closures, an estimated 30,000 children need education support.

Government-imposed restrictions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have had a significant impact on vulnerable families, undermining livelihoods, leading to loss of family income, increasing risks of violence, including gender-based violence, and heightened child protection concerns, particularly due to school closures. Limited humanitarian access has also slowed the timely provision of humanitarian assistance to communities in need and may challenge the drought response. This, combined with sharp rises in food prices at local markets, school closures and increasing protection risks may also exacerbate the food insecurity and nutrition crises. In addition, the 6,000 refugees in Luanda North continue to require integrated support.