Angola + 8 more

Affected Populations in the Great Lakes Region (Displaced - Dispersed - Refugees)

Format
Situation Report
Source
Posted
Originally published


SUMMARY TABLE
Updated version as of 23 October 1998

1) REPUBLIC OF CONGO (RoC-Brazzaville)

LOCATION
ORIGIN FIGURE
COMMENT
Loukolela
Rwandan 3,700
Refugee figure. Majority are young males with minimal interest in repatriation.
Liranga
Rwandan 500
Refugee figure. As above.
Ndjundou
Rwandan 2,024
Same as above.
Impfondo
Rwandan 670
Refugee figure.
Kintele
Rwandan 4,000
Refugee figure.
Impfondo
Burundian 74
Same as above.
Various areas
Burundian 200
Refugees located at various camps.
Pointe Noire
Angolan 20,000 *
Approximate refugee figure.
Pointe Noire
Cabindan 700
New arrivals as of August 1998.
Various areas
Congolese 200,000
Estimated displaced population.
Various areas
Congolese 1,000
Unaccompanied Children (UAC) figure.
Refugee figures provided by UNHCR. UAC figure by UNICEF.
Refugee Population:
Displaced Population:
UAC Population:
Total Affected Population:
31,868
200,000
1,000
232,868
General Humanitarian Situation

Insecurity continues in the Pool region of the Republic of Congo (RoC). A UNICEF-supported national nutrition survey in September was suspended due to insecurity and government employees working on the survey have since been reported missing. On 25 September armed assailants attacked a railway station on the Pointe-Noire - Brazzaville line. The line remains closed and has resulted in shortages of bread and fuel and the doubling in price of many basic goods in Brazzaville.

Refugee Situation

There are currently 20,000 Angolan refugees in Pointe Noire. Of this number only 6,000 are assisted by UNHCR and are located in the three camps of Komi, Mavoadi and Kondi. The remaining 14,000 are urban refugees living in and around Pointe-Noire town.

UNHCR reports the arrival two months ago of 700 new caseload Cabindan refugees who are currently located in the Niara region. There has been a small influx of refugees from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) of some 100 people.

At the end of September the RoC government requested UNHCR to find another host country for the 11,000 Rwandan refugees. It was reported that several hundred of these refugees had crossed into the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) to join the forces of President Kabila.

Unaccompanied Children (UACs)

According to UNICEF, many children in remote areas have, over the last 18 months, remained un-vaccinated. Renewed insecurity in parts of the country has led to inadequate access to food supplies, also jeopardizing the success of the reopening of the school year.

2) DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO (DRC)

LOCATION
ORIGIN FIGURE
COMMENT
Kinshasa
Congolese 150
Refugee figure. The bulk of the Congolese/Brazzaville refugees have been repatriated. Kinkole camp was officially closed on 25 February. The remaining 150 refugees are currently being screened by UNHCR.
Kinshasa
(Kinkole camp)
Other 580
Refugee figure: Mixed caseload of refugees from Angola and Central African Republic.
Mutwanga town
Mwenda (N. Kivu)
Ugandan 4,330 *
Approximate refugee figure. Number located by UNICEF and MSF-H while on mission to the region: 23-28 October 1997. Aid agencies believe that up to 23,000 Ugandans may be living in the dense forest areas of North Kivu.
Eastern DRC
Congolese
(ex-Zaïrian)
118,000
Current working figure for displaced population. Breakdown: North Kivu: up to 40,000 long-term displaced from 1993, 25,000 in Goma and Rutshuru from 1996-97 and 30,000 newly displaced on the border between Goma and Rutshuru (Rutshuru long-term and Masisi 1996-97). Masisi unable to monitor. South Kivu: 23,000.
Eastern and
Central DRC
Rwandan 37,000 **
Approximate refugee figure. It is estimated that approximately 37,000 Rwandan refugees, unverified by UNHCR, are located throughout eastern and central DRC.
Mbandaka
Mbuji-Mayi
Burundian 400
Approximate refugee figure.
South Kivu
Congolese
(Ex-Zaïrian)
50,550
Congolese repatriated by UNHCR from Tanzania.
Uvira/Fizi zone
Burundian 12,000
Estimated refugee figure. 3,000 Burundians were recently identified in Mboko, (apparently 1972 caseload)
Eastern DRC
Rwandan 1,900
Unaccompanied children (UAC); figures include some Burundian and Ugandan children. North Kivu: 1,327 Rwandans (registered by SCF).
Mbandaka
Mbuji Mayi
Rwandan 1,115
UAC: includes Burundian and Ugandan children. In Mbandaka: 615; Mbuji Mayi: 500.
Uvira
Congolese (Ex-Zaïrian) 200
UAC figure.
Shabunda
(Eastern DRC)
Rwandan/
Burundian
273
Figure for Rwandan and Burundian UACs registered by SCF of which 25-30 Burundian, the rest Rwandan. (An estimated total of between 600-1000 UACs exists in Shabunda).
North Kivu
Congolese
(Ex-Zaïrian)
700
ICRC active UAC reference cases. (The Provincial Social Affairs office December 97 report cites 267 UACs and 6,060 children in difficult situations in Goma. Following figures also reported for Masisi: Kitshanga: 101; Ngungu: 75; Lushebere: 65; Luabo: 30.
Province Oriental
Congolese
(Ex-Zaïrian)
10,000
Affected population as a result of the floods in and around Kisangani during late December 97.
Province Oriental
(Boga)
Ugandan 4,000
Government refugee figure in Boga (near Beni) provided during an inter-agency assessment mission between 5-12 May 1998.
Province Oriental
Sudanese 61,000
Sudanese refugees in Aru and Dungu areas.
Bas-Congo
(Lower Congo)
Angolan (Cabindan) 25,000
Cabindan refugees in Matadi area.
Bas-Congo
Angolan 500
New caseload Angolan refugees.
Katanga province
Angolan 50,000
30,000 new Angolan refugees have been reported in Kisenge, Katanga province. Kisenge was already hosting 20,000 Angolans.
Refugee figures provided by UNHCR, except the Ugandan figures by MSF and UNICEF and Boga figures by local authorities. Displaced population figures provided by OCHA Kinshasa. Figures for UAC provided by SCF-UK, except the North Kivu figure provided by ICRC. Figure for flood victims by UNDP, Kinshasa.
Refugee
Population:
Displaced Population:
UAC
Population:
Returnee Population:
Total Affected
Population:
194,960
128,000
4,188
50,550
377,698*
The above total figure does not take into account the 23,000 Ugandan refugees thought to be in eastern DRC.

* Due to the current crisis in the DRC, the above figures for affected populations have not been amended.

Current Situation

Several meetings took place in the month of September aimed at finding a solution to the current crisis in the DRC. Kabila attended the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) Summit in Durban on 2 September which was followed on 3 September by separate meetings between Kofi Annan, the OAU secretary general and the Rwandan and Ugandan delegations. At DRC peace talks in Victoria Falls held from 7-8 September and attended by the rebel delegation, the rebels who called for but were not party to direct negotiations with Kabila, rejected a cease-fire agreement put together by the heads of state. On 12 September talks organised by the OAU began in Addis resulted in an agreement on "draft modalities" for implementing a cease-fire. The rebels also rejected this while the Ugandan and Rwandan delegations walked out. On 15 September a SADC summit in Mauritius recognized the legitimacy of the intervention of Angola, Zimbabwe and Namibia in the DRC. At a pro-Kabila summit organised by Gabonese President Bongo on 24 September, Chad, Central African Republic, Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon, Angola, Namibia and Gabon condemned the "aggression against the DRC". During the course of September Kabila visited Chad, Gabon and Libya to garner support from regional leaders.

On 11 September the rebels captured Shabunda (South Kivu). Three days later Mayi-Mayi and Rwandan Hutu Interahamwe attacked rebel held Goma, but were repelled. Rebel claims that 2,000 Sudanese soldiers were sent to government military headquarters in Kindu to support Kabila allegedly with Libyan financial backing, were denied by the Sudanese and DRC governments. On 22 September rebels claimed that they had gained control of Isiro (Province Orientale). At the end of September Chad announced that it sent 1,000 troops to support Kabila.

On October 14 the town of Kindu, eastern DRC was confirmed to have fallen to the rebels. Rebel forces are now moving towards Mbuji-Maji.

Humanitarian Situation

The humanitarian situation in Kinshasa has improved considerably, however there is still a shortage of food and fuel, with basic commodities at double the pre-war prices. According to WFP the number of assisted malnourished children has increased by 40 percent since July. WFP is providing food to 30,000 children in feeding centres and orphanages, as well as to another 13,000 vulnerable people. The DRC government has requested WFP to provide food assistance for 500,000 residents affected by fighting in Kinshasa. WFP assistance is currently being targeted to 120,000 of the neediest people.

About 3,000 - 4,000 rebels soldiers remain in the western province of Bas-Congo and are threatening security along the Matadi-Kinshasa road.

A UN mission led by OCHA into Uvira and Kalemie, eastern DRC took place between 7-8 October to assess the humanitarian situation of displaced people in the area. The mission estimated that there were about 8,000-10,000 displaced Banyamulenge in Kalemie and Uvira who had fled the Vyura area of Katanga province following attacks on their villages. Although no severe humanitarian crisis was evident, the population has limited access to food and health facilites with water and sanitation situation in the IDP camp reportedly poor. The UN is currently examining ways of providing assistance to these and other affected groups in the area.

South Kivu province, especially the Shabunda area, is currently being hit by a cholera epidemic. There have been over 80 new cholera cases and 30 cholera-related deaths reported daily in treatment centres in the Shabunda area. Outbreaks have also been reported in Mwenga and Walungu, South Kivu. There is a considerable shortage of drugs and treatment facilities. A further cholera outbreak has been reported in Nyankunde area, Province Orientale near the Ugandan border. As of 30 September 120 cases and 22 deaths had been reported. Although some cholera drugs are available, a lack of transport coupled with insecurity are hindering the movement of supplies to treatment centres.

At the end of September forces of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) arrived in the Dungu area of Province Orientale, reportedly looting dispensaries, vehicles and food supplies. Sudanese refugees in camps near Dungu, Province Orientale have since been forced back to southern Sudan by SPLA soldiers who went through settlements sheltering some 41,000 Sudanese refugees. The refugees are moving to Yambio, Western Equatoria, Sudan. As of 15 October, WFP in Yambio reported that 14,241 Sudanese returnees from the DRC had been registered by local authorities. Of this number 10,995 are from Yambio County, 3,015 are from Maridi County, 153 are from Tambura County, and 78 are from Yei County. About 1,000 refugees continue to cross the border every day. The returnees are reported to be in good health. WFP is currently distributing 36 MT of cereals from World Vision International stocks, until the arrival of 150 MT of WFP commodities dispatched by road from Koboko, Uganda.

Population Movement from DRC

Following are details of population movements from the DRC into neighbouring countries since the beginning of September 1998:

Country
Number of DRC refugees
Comment
Tanzania
12,296
As of 18 October the influx of Congolese refugees into Kigoma.
Burundi
6,474*
As of 16 October the number of Congolese refugees registered in Cibitoke camps.
Rwanda
514
Of this number 217 are located at the Bugarama way station, Cyangugu and 297 are dispersed in public buildings in Kamembe and Cyimbogo communes.
RoC
100
The number of new caseload Congolese refugees in Pointe-Noire since the beginning of the DRC conflict.
* All registration of refugees from the DRC in Cibitoke has been temporarily halted due to cases of double registration, until a more suitable system is devised.

2) TANZANIA

LOCATION
ORIGIN FIGURE
COMMENT
Kigoma
Burundian 156,632
Refugee figure.
Kigoma
Other 2,979
Refugee figure. Mixed marriages caseload: Rwandans and Burundians.
Kigoma
Congolese
(DRC)
47,019
Refugee figure.
Ngara (Lukole A&B)
Burundian 108,595
Refugee figure.
Ngara
(Mwisa Karagwe)
Rwandan 36
Refugee figure reflecting Rwandans seeking asylum. The authorities are still reviewing their status.
Ngara (Mbuba Reception Centre)
Rwandan 4,375
Rwandans received, registered and assisted at Mbuba transit facility, Ngara.
Mkuyu, Handeni District
Somali 3,000
Refugee figure.
Kigwa
Other 1,004
Refugee figure. Mixed population of Congolese, Ugandan, Burundian, Angolans.
Various
Tanzanian 1,885
Figures for UAC: 509 in Ngara district, 562 in Kibondo district and 814 in Kasulu district.
Refugee figures provided by UNHCR. Figures for UAC provided by UNICEF, Dar es Salaam.
Refugee Population:
UAC Population:
Total Affected Population:
323,640
1,885
325,525
Refugee Situation

The influx of Congolese refugees into Tanzania as a result of the rebellion in the DRC has continued. As of 18 October a total of 11,289 Congolese have arrived in Kigoma with a large number fleeing Kalemie and Fizi, eastern DRC. The group from Fizi confirmed reports that there are still many Congolese in both Ubwari and Kazimia peninsula waiting to cross into Tanzania.

There has also been a considerable influx of Burundians into Tanzania. Since the beginning of August a total of 3,046 Burundians have been received in Tanzania. Meanwhile, a number of Burundian refugees continue to return home from Tanzania under a voluntary repatriation programme. During the first week of October 109 Burundians from camps in Kibondo and 608 from Ngara were assisted in their return to Burundi.

The figures for the Kigoma District camps have been updated as of September 30, following a verification exercise by UNHCR.

Small numbers of Rwandans continue to be received at Mbuba transit centre, Ngara. There are currently 4,375 Rwandan refugees at this location.

4) RWANDA

LOCATION
ORIGIN
FIGURE
COMMENT
Kibuye
(Kiziba Camp)
Congolese
(DRC)
14,507*
Refugee figure.
Byumba
(Gihembe Camp)
Congolese
(DRC)
16,964*
Refugee figure. Transferred from Gisenyi (Mudende camp) to Byumba Prefecture.
Cyangugu
Congolese (DRC)
217
Refugee figure. Congolese refugees located at Bugarama way station.
Various
Burundian
574
Refugee figure. Registered in camps in the following prefectures: Cyangugu, Gikongoro, Butare and Umutara.
Gisenyi
Rwandan
186,547
Displaced figure.
Ruhengeri
Rwandan
324,000
Displaced population; approximate figure.
Kibuye
Rwandan
8,000
Displaced population; as above.
Gitarama
Rwandan
6,000
Displaced population.
Various
Rwandan
5,343
Figure for UACs located in 45 centres throughout the country.
Various
Rwandan
125,530
Approximate detainee figure. Detainees living in prisons and cachots.
Figures for refugees provided by UNHCR, Kigali. Displaced figures for Ruhengeri provided by Concern Int’l, for Gisenyi provided by WFP and IRC. UAC figures provided by UNICEF, Kigali. Detainee figure by ICRC, Kigali.
Refugee Population:
Displaced Population:
UAC
Population:
Detainee Population:
Total Affected
Population:
32,262
524,547
5,343
125,530
687,682
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

The number of IDPs in north-western Rwanda has increased dramatically over the last month. This increased displacement is a result of increased RPA counter-insurgency activities through the hills of the north-west. They also consist of people who have recently emerged from the forests to which they had fled. According to WFP, the number of beneficiaries in Gisenyi prefecture have gone up by over 54,000 since August. In Ruhengeri the number of WFP beneficiaries has increased by over 56,000. In Cyeru, Ruhengeri prefecture, 69,000 almost the entire commune’s population, has been displaced from their homes. On visual inspection, malnutrition is apparent in many of the newly displaced.

Refugee Situation

Since the beginning of the conflict in the DRC 514 Congolese refugees have arrived in Cyangugu prefecture. 217 are located at the Bugarama way station and 297 are dispersed in public buildings in Kamembe and Cyimbogo communes. These refugees are to be transferred to Nyagatare Transit centre in Cyangugu. The Burundian refugees in Musange Transit centre were transferred to Kigeme camp on September 2. Following the voluntary repatriation of 701 Burundians on September 10, Kibangira camp, Cyangugu was closed.

* The populations for Kiziba and Gihembe camps are estimates; UNHCR is planning registration.

Unaccompanied Children (UAC)

There are currently 1,200 UACs with no address, with another 2,639 awaiting reunification and 1,504 living in sites. It must be stressed that an estimated 45,000 households in Rwanda are headed by children. These children have been separated from their families during fighting, are orphans due to AIDS, as a result of the genocide, or have parents who are currently serving prison sentences.

Detainees

Of the 125,530 detainees in Rwanda, 4,300 are women, 735 are accompanied children and 700 are accused minors (under 14 in 1994). Of the total number of detainees 84,518 are located in prisons, another 37,872 are located in cachots. Military prisons hold 1,800 whilst 861 are located in Brigades de Gendarmes.

5) UGANDA

LOCATION
ORIGIN
FIGURE
COMMENT
Mbarara District
Oruchinga Camp
Rwandan
6,369
Refugee figure. 1994 caseload, though there are some new arrivals.
Mbarara District
Nakivale
Rwandan
3,434
Refugee figure. Majority are 1959 caseload.
Camp also includes Somalis, Ethiopians and some Kenyans.
Kabarole District
Kyaka II Camp
Congolese
(DRC)
670*
Refugee figure. 1992-93 caseload. Repatriation is ongoing.
Hoima District
Kyangwali Camp
Congolese
(DRC)
3,070
Refugee figure. Since November 1996, some are still arriving. Figure includes 350 Sudanese refugees.
North/northwest (Arua, Moyo and Adjumani)
Sudanese
134,803
Refugee figure. 1992-94 caseload, though some have been there since the late 1980s.
Kiryandongo
Sudanese
9,856**
Refugee figure. 1992-94 caseload.
Kitgum
Sudanese
19,920
Refugee figure. 1992-94 caseload.
Kitgum and Gulu
Ugandan
324,327
Displaced population. Breakdown: Gulu 261,206 and Kitgum 63,121.
Lira District
Ugandan
13,000
Displaced population by flooding receiving monthly food ration from WFP.
Bundibugyo
(Western Uganda)
Ugandan
11,000
Estimated displaced population. Represents the number of people assisted by WFP.
Kitgum District
Ugandan
59,000
Estimated drought affected population being assisted by WFP.
Karamoja Region
Ugandan
67,000
Estimated drought affected population being assisted by WFP in Kotido and Moroto districts.
Figures for refugees provided by UNHCR, Kampala and WFP, Kampala.
Refugee Population:
Displaced Population:
Total Affected Population:
178,122
474,327
652,449
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

Improved security conditions have permitted many people in Gulu district to go out of the camps and take advantage of the rains to work the land. For this reason, WFP plans to provide food assistance to only 11 of the existing 20 displaced camps in October.

The WFP assistance programme in Bundibugyo district has now been completed following the final distribution to this caseload of 11,000 people. ICRC continues to maintain a limited food distribution (approximately 25,000) in Kasese District.

Refugee Situation

Following a joint crop assessment mission carried out in September 1998, a 20 percent food reduction for Sudanese refugees in northern Uganda is expected to be effected beginning in January next year. Reductions will then take place every cropping season until the refugees are phased out of general food distributions and have become food self-sufficient on land provided for cropping by the government.

* The current figure at Kyaka II camp now stands at 670. The reduction in numbers is, according to UNHCR, due to the previous presence of about 1,000 "ghost beneficiaries" and approximately 1,000 people who had previously claimed to be ‘originally Ugandans’ living in the DRC. These people returned with the Congolese caseload of 92-94 and lived as refugees until repatriation time when they could not return and finally declared their correct nationality. They have now spontaneously resettled, some of them going back to their original villages.

** In 1996, approximately 3,500 Sudanese refugees fled from Acholi settlement due to insecurity. They are now included in the caseload of Kiryandogo.

6) BURUNDI

LOCATION
ORIGIN
FIGURE
COMMENT
Bubanza
Burundian
132,641
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Bujumbura
(Mairie & Rural)
Burundian
66,987
Same as above.
Bururi
Burundian
85,737
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Cibitoke
Burundian
13,565
Same as above.
Gitega
Burundian
18,316
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Karuzi
Burundian
34,360
Same as above.
Kayanza
Burundian
28,879
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Kirundo
Burundian
27,852
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Makamba
Burundian
36,710
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Muramvya
Burundian
27,063
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Muyinga
Burundian
32,081
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Ngozi
Burundian
25,712
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Rutana
Burundian
2,576
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Ruyigi
Burundian
2,127
Figure for displaced populations living in sites.
Cibitoke
Congolese
(DRC)
7,822
Figure of refugee influx from the DRC as of the beginning of August 1998.
Various
Burundian
4,500
Approximate figure for UACs.
Figures provided by OCHA/HCU, Bujumbura, UAC figure by UNICEF.
Displaced Population:
Refugee Population:
UAC Population:
Total Affected Population:
534,606
7,822
4,500
546,928
Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs)

The estimated number of people living in 300 displaced sites throughout Burundi is 534,606 or approximately 9 percent of the total population. The numbers of displaced in each province are directly related to the levels of insecurity.

The largest displaced populations continue to be found in the most insecure provinces of Bubanza, Bururi and Bujumbura Rurale. The curfew in Bubanza province has been extended to run from 21h00 instead of midnight due to increased insecurity in the area. NGOs operating in the province have advised their staff to no longer spend the night in the area. Attacks by armed assailants have been reported in Bubanza and Cibitoke provinces as well as in Bujumbura Rurale. The estimated 5,000-8,000 people that were recently displaced as a result of insecurity in Rutana have been able to return to their homes. This was confirmed by a UNDP/IMC mission to Rutana on October 22 and 23.

Refugee Situation

The influx of refugees from the DRC has continued in the past month with the total number of Congolese refugees registered in camps in Cibitoke as of 16 October reaching 6,474. The number of Burundians in camps is 2,467. In addition 3,500 Burundians have been reintegrated thus far.

Since the beginning of 1998 UNHCR has facilitated the return of some 7,500 people from Tanzania. (4,169 have been returned from Kibondo camps since January 25. Between 1 and 27 September 1,520 Burundians have been assisted in returning to Burundi). Assistance includes transport from Tanzania as well as a three-month food and non-food return package. The majority are returned to Muyinga and Ruyigi provinces, where approximately 400 and 200 Burundians respectively, arrive per week.

Unaccompanied Children (UAC)

It is estimated that the number of UACs in Burundi could be as high as 4,500. Eleven of 43 UACs who had been transferred to the Mpanda transit centre from the destroyed ACF feeding centre in Maramvya have been successfully reunited with their families as a result of tracing efforts by Children’s Aid Direct.

7) OTHER

LOCATION
ORIGIN
FIGURE
COMMENT
Angola
Rwandan
2,200
Approximate refugee figure.
Angola
Burundian
150
Approximate refugee figure.
Benin
Rwandan
800
Refugee figure.
Cameroon
Rwandan
650
Refugee figure.
Cameroon
Burundian
270
Refugee figure.
Cameroon
Congolese (RoC)
200
Refugee figure.
Cameroon
Congolese (DRC)
170
Refugee figure.
Central African Rep. (CAR)
Rwandan
1,400 *
Refugee figure.
Kenya
Rwandan
7,700
Total figure for Rwandan refugees. Only 312 are registered and assisted by UNHCR at Kakuma camp.
Malawi
Rwandan
260
Refugee figure.
Malawi
Congolese (DRC)
400
Refugee figure.
Malawi
Burundian
200
Refugee figure.
Sudan
Congolese (DRC)
3,600**
Refugee figure.
Togo
Rwandan
400
Refugee figure.
Zambia
Congolese (DRC)
2,216***
Refugee figure.
Zambia
Angolan
22,769****
Refugee figure.
Zambia
Rwandan
700
Refugee figure.
Zambia
Burundian
1,131
Refugee figure.
Figures provided by UNHCR.
Total Refugees:
45,216
* Since the outbreak of hostilities in the DRC, the UN and its implementing agencies have made contingency plans to cater for the influx into the CAR of between 5,000-10,000 refugees, the latter figure representing a worst case scenario.

** Since the outbreak of hostilities in the DRC, contingency plans have been prepared to cater for the influx into the Sudan of between 5,000-30,000 refugees, the latter figure representing the worst case scenario.

*** Since the outbreak of hostilities in the DRC, contingency plans have been prepared to cater for the influx of about 105,000 refugees from the DRC. Of this number emergency plans have been made for 5,000 in the north , 80,000 in the Copperbelt and 20,000 in the north west.

**** There has been a small influx of 96 Angolans into Zambia as a result of the current instability in Angola. (It should be noted that about 50 Angolans usually arrive in Zambia every month.) Contingency plans made by UNHCR plan to prepare for an influx of between 5,000-10,000 Angolan new arrivals due to the instability in that country.

Total Refugee Population:
813,890
Total Displaced Population:
1,861,480
Total UAC Population:
16,916
GRAND TOTAL:
2,868,366
The grand total includes the 125,530 detainees in Rwanda 50,550 Congolese repatriated from Tanzania to South Kivu.

For any additional information for the summary table, please contact:

Paola Emerson
UN Office of the Regional Humanitarian Co-ordinator
For the Great Lakes Region
OCHA, Nairobi

Telephone: +254-2-622893
email: paola@ocha.unon.org
Fax: +254-2-622632

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.