Algeria + 1 more

UNICEF Saharawi Refugee Camps - Tindouf, Algeria, Humanitarian Situation Report No. 2, 22 August 2016

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Situation Report
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Highlights

The effects of the storm that hit the Sahrawi refugee camp of Laayoun on 15 August combined with the return of high temperature, resulted in more of the damaged mud houses and other infrastructure to collapse. This increased the number of houses damaged and of people affected by the emergency.

The latest assessment by UN agencies, NGOs and the Sahrawi Red Crescent raised the number of families directly affected to a total of 849 families (an estimated 4,245 people), of whom 406 families lost their homes and are relying on the solidarity of their neighbors for shelter.

In addition to the 6 out of 8 schools that were damaged, 5 kindergartens out of 7 also suffered damages, with about 80% of all school-age children (8,109 children) at risk of not accessing education.

UNICEF, in collaboration with education authorities, visited all the affected school sites and agreed on contingency measures so children can go back to school on 6 September, the first day of school. Detailed planning for and costing of rehabilitation works are under way.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

A strong storm accompanied by heavy rains hit Laayoune Camp on 15 August, one of the 5 Sahrawi refugee camps near Tindouf. It was reported that a man who had been severely injured with family members when the roof of his house collapsed died from his injuries in the hospital. 10 other people were injured.

Damaged mud houses and infrastructure continued to collapse in the days following the storm. According to the latest assessment conducted by UN agencies, NGOs and the Sahrawi Red Crescent, 849 families (estimated 4,245 people) were affected by this disaster, of whom 406 families suffered complete loss of their homes and are relying on the solidarity of their neighbours for shelter.

Visits to schools by UNICEF and education authorities revealed that in addition to 6 out of 8 schools in the camp that were damaged, additional 5 out of 7 kinder gardens were also suffered damages. 80% of school-aged children (8,109 children) may not be able to start school on 6 September.