Afghanistan

Corruption & Anti-Corruption Issues in Afghanistan

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Analysis
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Foreword to the Compendium

This volume combines the outputs of a series concerning corruption and anti-corruption efforts in Afghanistan produced by Knowledge Managers (KMs) from the Civil-Military Fusion Centre (CFC). This series was motivated by requests and suggestions from personnel working with civilian and military organisations in Afghanistan. Each of the reports in this series – and in this compendium – highlight not only the problem posed by corruption but also the steps being taken to detect, discourage, penalise and prevent it. I suggest that readers review the enclosed pieces not only to better understand the challenge posed by corruption but also to see what opportunities and entry points exist for addressing it.

Further information on this topic is available at www.cimicweb.org, and source documents used in producing this compendium can be accessed by clicking on any of the hyperlinks embedded within each of the following chapters. As with all CFC publications, your feedback is greatly appreciated and can be sent to us at Afghanistan@cimicweb.org. We would welcome input not only on this series but also recommendations for other topics, issues and trends to be addressed by the CFC’s Afghanistan Team. Upcoming series will focus upon Peace & Reintegration (March-April) and Counter-Narcotics (May-June), though we are open to suggestions from our readers and all relevant stakeholders.

For those readers who find the information in this compendium useful, we encourage you to explore the full range of resources provided by the CFC. These include a weekly update on events in Afghanistan known as the “Afghanistan Review” newsletter as well as sector-specific reports drafted by KMs on issues pertaining to economic development, governance and rule of law, security and force protection and, lastly, social and strategic infrastructure. In addition, the CFC’s web portal, CimicWeb, provides additional resources, including a database of more than 200 provincial-level indicators and a web page dedicated to the December 2011 Bonn Conference on Afghanistan. Lastly, the CFC provides a request for information (RFI). Individuals who subscribe to our CimicWeb portal have the opportunity to submit RFIs to our KMs and receive tailored responses. These responses range from short e-mail replies to comprehensive reports. To enjoy all of these resources and to receive notices about CFC publications and products, sign up by clicking here.

Steven A. Zyck
Afghanistan Team Leader
February 2012