Afghanistan + 1 more

ACT Appeal Afghanistan: Relief & Rehabilitation - ASAF-21 appeal (Rev 1)

Format
Appeal
Source
Posted
Originally published

Attachments


Appeal Target: US$ 5,595,512
Balance Requested from ACT Network: US$ 3,568,356

Geneva, 6 August 2002

Dear Colleagues,

At the end of the 90s the Imam-Sahib district in Kunduz Province, northern Afghanistan became an asylum area for the Afghan people from the central and northern Afghanistan who were fleeing from the Taliban army. In August 2000 after capturing this region, the Taliban forces destroyed a great number of houses and its few industries. Many local people who had no time to flee were shot on the spot or disappeared.

In autumn 2001 when the USA began its anti-terror operation, the military and political situation changed throughout Afghanistan. The Imam-Sahib district has since become one of the IDP concentration areas and many IDPs returning to the district found their houses destroyed and property looted.

At present the Imam-Sahib region is suffering from the after effects of conflict and neglect, with evidence of extreme poverty. There are now over 400,000 people or some 37,000 families in the region including about 100,000 resettlers, with over 20,000 of them in the city proper.

As of the end of May, there are 17 IDP camps in the region with about 4,000 vulnerable and most needy families, according to data supplied by the Afghan leaders. Many IDPs live in the open in home-made shacks or tents made of twigs, mats, planks or polythene. The few factories were destroyed by the Taliban before their withdrawal and a refugee camp for almost 500 families has since been set up in a ruined cotton factory.

This revision of the ACT Appeal ASAF-21 (originally issued 15 May 2002) includes a proposal by ACT member the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) only. The project is to assist internally displaced Afghans in the Imam-Sahib district in Kunduz Province and comprises: distribution of food and hygiene items as well as setting up of sewing workshops.

For information on ACT members Norwegian Church Aid and Church World Service projects please refer to the original appeal.

Project Completion Date:

NCA - 31 December 2002

CWS-P/A - 31 March 2003

ROC - 31 December 2002

Summary of Appeal Targets, Pledges/Contributions Received and Balance Requested

NCA
CWS
ROC
Comm
Co-ord
Total Targets US$
Appeal Targets
3,238,291
1,994,406
347,815
10,000
5,000
5,595,512
Less: Pledges/ Contr. Recd
771,205
1,250,951
2,500
2,500
2,027,156
Balance Requested from ACT Network
2,467,086
743,455
347,815
7,500
2,500
3,568,356
       

Please kindly send your contributions to the following ACT bank account:

Account Number - 240-432629.60A (USD)
Account Name: ACT - Action by Churches Together
UBS SA
PO Box 2600
1211 Geneva 2
SWITZERLAND

Please also inform the Finance Officer Jessie Kgoroeadira (direct tel. +4122/791.60.38, e-mail address jkg@act-intl.org) of all pledges/contributions and transfers, including funds sent direct to the implementers, now that the Pledge Form is no longer attached to the Appeal.

We would appreciate being informed of any intent to submit applications for EU, USAID and/or other back donor funding and the subsequent results. We thank you in advance for your kind co-operation.

ACT Web Site address: http://www.act-intl.org

Thor-Arne Prois
Director, ACT

ACT is a worldwide network of churches and related agencies meeting human need through coordinated emergency response.

The ACT Coordinating Office is based with the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) in Switzerland.

I. REQUESTING ACT MEMBER

  • Russian Orthodox Church (ROC)

II. IMPLEMENTING ACT MEMBER INFORMATION

For the last 12 years the Russian Orthodox Church has been actively developing its emergency services both nationally and internationally. The local social service of the Church is carried out in every parish - assistance for the needy in various forms, children's education and care for elderly are an important part of the Church's mission. ROC has also participated in various social and emergency projects in Russia, as well as in other countries - Tajikistan, Moldova, Belarus, Ukraine, Estonia, Ethiopia, Serbia.

Over the past years the Russian Orthodox Church has gained experience implementing ACT emergency programs. In 1994 and 1995 ACT counter-flood projects were implemented in Moldova and in 1998 - in Tajikistan. From 1995 emergency programs have been implemented in Chechnya and North Caucasus, in 1999 - Russia Winter Assistance Program, in 2000 - emergency aid for IDPs in Serbia. In 2001 counter-Flood projects were implemented in different parts of Russia.

In March-June 2002 ROC implemented the emergency relief program for Afghan refugees on the Tajik-Afghan border within the framework of ASAF-11.

The proposed emergency relief program for the Afghan IDPs in Northern Afghanistan will be implemented by ROC with participation and support of the parishes in the deanery of Tajikistan, which have been actively assisting the needy people and refugees. Tajikistan borders Northern Afghanistan and is conveniently placed for access.

The work will be co-ordinated by the office in Dushanbe which will be a contribution in kind on behalf of the Tajik deanery of the ROC. The project will utilize the experience, trained staff and infrastructure of the ROC/RRF Flood project in Tajikistan (1998) and ASAF-11 ACT/ROC emergency relief program for the Afghan refugees on the Tajik-Afghan border (2002).

The program will be carried out with the help of the Afghan secular and Muslim religious authorities, Tajik and Russian EMERCOM, NGOs, UNHCR, OCHA, WFP. These institutions have been involved in discussions concerning the proposal and will facilitate its implementation.

Russia Round Table / Department for External Church Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate on behalf of the ROC will participate in this program.

III. DESCRIPTION OF THE EMERGENCY SITUATION

Nearly 25 years of incessant wars and four years of poor crops in a row have resulted in a catastrophic humanitarian situation in Afghanistan long before the beginning of the US anti-terror operation. According to the UN data, almost a quarter of the Afghan population, that is six million people, are starving today. For many years Afghanistan has ranked as one of the least developed countries in the world, and the situation worsened noticeably under the Taliban.

At the end of 90s the Imam-Sahib district became an asylum area for the Afghan people from Central and Northern Afghanistan who were fleeing from the Taliban army. In August 2000 after capturing this region, the Taliban forces destroyed a great number of houses and its few industries. Many local people who had no time to flee were shot on the spot or disappeared.

When in autumn 2001 the USA began its anti-terror operation, the military and political situation changed throughout Afghanistan. The Imam-Sahib district has since become one of the IDP concentration areas in northern Afghanistan. Among the IDPs there are those who fled not only from Kunduz Province, but also from the adjacent regions, such as Faizabad and Badakhshan in which intensive military action took place. Coming back to the Imam-Sahib district many of the IDPs found their houses destroyed and property looted.

At present the Imam-Sahib region is suffering from the after effects of conflict and neglect, with evidence of extreme poverty. There are now over 400,000 people or some 37,000 families in the region including about 100,000 resettlers, with over 20,000 of them in the city proper. According to UNHCR data, 47 % of the population there are Uzbek, 25% Tajik, 22 Pashtun, 4% -Turkmen and 2 % Hazara. Before the region was occupied by the Taliban and had a population of 250,000.

As of the end of May, there are 17 IDP camps in the region with about 4,000 vulnerable and most needy families, according to data supplied by the Afghan leaders. Many refugees live in the open in home-made shacks or tents made of twigs, mats, planks or polythene. The few factories were destroyed by the Taliban before their withdrawal and a refugee camp for almost 500 families has been set up in a ruined cotton factory.

In spite of very difficult conditions, the region is returning to a peaceful life. 45 schools including one for girls, which were closed by the Taliban, have now been reopened. Each school is attended by 2,500-3,000 children in three shifts. Because of the lack of room, lessons are conducted in the streets near the schools.

Location

The program will be implemented in the 17 IDP camps of Imam-Sahib district in the Kunduz Province (Northern Afghanistan). Afghanistan is divided into 29 provinces and 300 districts. Imam-Sahib is one of the largest and most populated districts of Afghanistan that borders Tajikistan. This city has a rich history with the ancient Imam-Sahib city being situated near a mosque built 450 years ago which is today 700m from the new Imam-Sahib city which was built only 40 years ago.

The IDP camps are located in and around Imam-Shahib city, relatively close to each other and accessible by car.

IV. TARGETED BENEFICIARIES

The ROC will target approximately 32,000 vulnerable Afghan IDPs (4,000 families) in the 17 IDP camps to receive emergency assistance. These will be the poorest and most vulnerable families. They have no opportunity to return to their home areas in other regions of Afghanistan as their homes have been destroyed or plundered. Furthermore, they have no access to agricultural land and often have incurred debts with shopkeepers in their present location, which they have to pay off before being allowed to leave.

Generally speaking almost all the Afghan population may be referred to as vulnerable, poor and needy. However, this proposal aims to assist those persons who are the poorest IDPs in the camps as these have no opportunity to start economic activities or gain a stable income through any kind of labour. They often have only temporary shelter and no real place to live, no land to work on and no money to rent land or start some economic activity. Overall priority will be given to female-headed households and the elderly.

The selection was made based on the information collected during the field visits to Imam-Sahib and surrounding camps and taking into consideration opinions of the Afghan secular and Islamic leaders,

V. GOAL & OBJECTIVES

Goal:

To continue the support to the Afghani people in their efforts to build a new life, through the provision of relief and rehabilitation assistance to Afghan IDPs in the Imam-Sahib region of Afghanistan,

Objectives:

  • to provide emergency relief in the form of food and hygiene items

  • to provide clothing and rehabilitation assistance through the opening of sewing workshops to create stable working places, produce clothing and to develop the local communities infrastructure.

  • to continue the inter-religious and inter-cultural dialogue

VI. PROPOSED EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE & IMPLEMENTATION

Under this appeal the implementation of two projects is planned:

Project 1 - Relief: Distribution of food and hygiene kits

Project 2 - Rehabilitation: setting up of sewing workshops

Project 1 - Distribution of Food and Hygiene kits

Beneficiaries: 32,000 Afghan refugees (4,000 families), staying in the camps in the Imam-Sahib district of Afghanistan will be assisted.

No regular assistance has been provided to these IDP camps. During visits to the camps and in meetings with local officials and Islamic leaders a list of essentials was prepared, focusing on food and hygiene items. ROC hopes to provide these essentials for a period of three months and will monitor the situation to see what further has to be done if IDPs do not return to their original villages.

Supplies: The following items were recommended, procured and distributed by Russian EMERCOM, Tajik Government and Afghan authorities:

Content of Food parcel
Qnty/family, kg.
No. of Distribs (3 month  period)
Total, kg.
Flour
10
3
30
Rice
10
3
30
Sugar
5
3
15
Vegetable oil
2
3
6
Tea
0.2
3
0.6

Content of Hygienic kit
Qnt/family, kg.
No. of Distribs (3 month  period)
Total, kg.
Soap (100 gr. bars)
0.5
3
1.5
Washing powder (450 gr packs)
0.9
3
2.7

The first stage will involve a market analysis to identify the lowest prices for quality food and hygiene commodities. The aid items will be purchased locally (when possible) or in Tajikistan ensuring the beneficiaries will be confident in the quality and acceptability of the goods, for there is a fear that imported goods may be of poor quality or unacceptable for religious or ethnic reasons.

The aid will be distributed by project transport monitors and the beneficiaries will be requested to fill in and sign a specially developed form. (This methodology has proven to be the most efficient in giving designated aid to IDPs and makes the principle and methods of work understandable for both local authorities and beneficiaries - taking into consideration local norms aid has to be distributed among families, rather than individuals).

Project 2 -Sewing workshops.

This activity was identified to meet the urgent need for clothing and to create some job opportunities.

Beneficiaries: for job creation, 10 to 15 women in each of the 17 workshops will be selected amongst those who have the necessary skills. Furthermore, the most needy IDPs in the camps will benefit from distribution of the clothes produced.

The selection will be done by ROC together with the local officials and religious leaders.

Each workshop will be set up on the basis of 17 IDP camps. The local secular or Muslim authorities will provide a locale. A special contract is to be signed between communities and the Program that will prescribe the distribution of the clothes produced among the most needy IDPs staying in the camps. The list of these IDPs will be prepared together with the leaders of the camps and the local secular and Muslim authorities in the Imam-Sahib district.

The women working in the shops will be paid in kind, with the produced clothes. For the program duration period, the workshops will be provided with the necessary supplies, such as fabrics, thread, buttons, etc. It is expected that, after the initial assistance, the workshops will continue to produce clothes for the most needy, while the supplies will be provided by the mosques. After the programme is completed, the equipment of each workshop - 4 sewing machines, 1 knitting machine, spare parts, cutting tables and sewing kits - will be handed over to the local communities through the mosques. In this way it is expected that this activity will have a longer term impact and provide some job creation.

Implementation:

The local field workers/ transport monitors will do the distribution. Every monitor will be responsible for a certain number of camps (5 or 6). The work plans for distribution and the beneficiaries lists will be prepared by the ROC programme staff in co-ordination with the local Afghani secular and religious leaders and approved by the Programme Director.

The programme staff as well as the office are only hired for the duration of the programme. Volunteers from the ROC Deanery and Parishes in Tajikistan will assist the office and programme staff when needed.

Procurement and Transportation:

The items will be mainly procured in Tajiskistan, as it is very difficult or even impossible to procure most of the essential items in the working area. The goods will be trucked to the different distribution places in the district. Transportation agreements have been reached with the Russian and Tajik EMERCOM, Russian and Afghan frontier guards and Afghan authorities to ensure secure transportation of goods to the target areas.

Previously a special Russian Emergency Ministry convoy transported the goods. The trucks of this convoy have now been given to the Afghan authorities and therefore other means of transportation have to be sought, accounting for an increase in this budget item.

VII. ADMINISTRATION, FINANCE, MONITORING & REPORTING

Administration

The program office will continue to be situated in the city of Dushanbe in Tajikistan as the Tajik territory gives the most convenient access to the Imam-Sahib district and Northern Afghanistan. The office space is a contribution in kind on behalf of the Tajik diocese of the ROC. The office itself has no equipment needed to carry out the work. Under ASAF11 all the administrative support (printing, documentation, etc.) was done with the assistance of the Round Table in Moscow. However, this is not an efficient way and limits the working capacity of the office. Therefore it is proposed to equip the office in Dushanbe with all necessary furniture and appliances (printer, photocopy machine, phones, water cleaning system, office supplies and stationery). A computer will be provided by the Round Table and a telephone-fax machine will be provided by the ROC Tajikistan Deanery. When ROC closes its Afghanistan programme in Dushanbe the equipment will be handed over to the ROC Tajikistan Deanery in Dushanbe who will utilise it for parish social work, including assistance to Afghan Refugees.

Upon the completion of the programme a special meeting will be organised by the Dushanbe office to evaluate the work done and to make recommendations for its possible continuation. In this evaluation session the programme participants, secular and religious leaders from the Imam-Sahib region in Afghanistan, ROC Tajiskistan Deanery and the Moscow office of the Round Table/CECR will participate.

Monitoring

A representative from the Russia Round Table/Department for External Church Relations of the Moscow Patriarchate will direct the Program and will be based in Dushanbe. He will be responsible for the ongoing monitoring of the programme through monthly visits to the camps. He will in particular control the quantity and quality of the procured items as well as the implementation of the distribution. A book-keeper will be based in Dushanbe. Logistic support is placed in the field as well as in the Dushanbe office.

Finance

ROC will be responsible to ACT for project and financial reporting on project implementation.

The accounts and financial reports will be audited by I.V. Shutyleva and Z. and A. Kosmodemianskie, str. 11/15-56, licensed by the Russian Federation Finance Ministry #005759 dated 19/4/2000.

In view of the limited and unstable banking system in Tajikistan, funds will be carried from Russia to Tajikistan by the ROC representatives.

VIII. IMPLEMENTATION TIMETABLE

It is estimated that the implementation will take around three months, but taking into consideration that funding may not be immediately available, the programme is expected to be completed by 31 December 2002.

IX. CO-ORDINATION

During the program implementation ROC will closely co-operate with the Afghan and Tajik officials as well as Muslim authorities, the UN and NGOs representatives.

ROC co-operates as closely as it can with the other ACT implementing members in Afghanistan taking into consideration the great distances. Most contact is by phone to exchange information, discuss security issues and possible further actions in Afghanistan. Whenever possible the representative of the ROC/Round Table (Programme Director or other representative) will attend ACT co-ordinating meetings.

While preparing the program, ROC representatives held meetings and talks with all the sides involved in the humanitarian effort in Afghanistan.

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