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RLP
Academic and Research Institution based in Uganda

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64 entries found
04 Sep 2017 description
report Refugee Law Project

This paper explores whether a systematic approach to screening for experiences of violence (sexual, physical and psychological) is possible in a range of humanitarian settings (just arrived and longer-term, rural and urban) and, if so, what kinds of levels of disclosure are found, what are some of the factors influencing disclosure positively and negatively, and what might be the cost of addressing the most urgent needs.

1 RESEARCH SUMMARY

04 Nov 2016 description
report Refugee Law Project

By Charles Waddimba (Published 4th November 2016)

Uganda is home to 695,386 refugees and asylum seekers (Office of the Prime Minister, September 2016) mostly originating from neighboring countries within the Great Lakes Region of Africa such as South Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia, Gambia, Benin, Ethiopia, and Eritrea among others. This number is likely to rise still further given the political upheaval in Burundi and South Sudan.

20 Jun 2016 description
report Refugee Law Project

Executive summary

This study looked at the mental wellbeing of refugees in prisons located in Western Uganda. It arose out of RLP’s routine visits to detention facilities in the region under the objective on providing comprehensive legal aid to forced migrants in Uganda. RLP believed that in order to provide adequate and prompt services to refugee inmates, an understanding of their mental wellbeing was pertinent. The study specifically aimed at;

21 Mar 2016 description

Executive summary

Men’s experiences as victims of sexual and gender-based violence remain little recognised in research, policy or practice. Mainstream narratives generally continue to depict men as perpetrators of violence and women as victims. Yet, having been linked to forced migration in contexts of armed conflict, sexual violence against men is slowly becoming recognised as far more widespread than was previously thought.