RIASCO
International Organization

All Updates

8 entries found
13 Dec 2016 description

KEY MESSAGES

El Niño conditions persisting during the 2015/16 planting season have caused the worst drought in 35 years in Southern Africa, resulting in a second consecutive failed harvest. This has created severe food shortages and compounded existing vulnerabilities. Since July 2016, Namibia and Botswana have declared national drought emergencies, in addition to the declarations made earlier by Lesotho, Malawi, Swaziland and Zimbabwe. Madagascar issued a letter of solidarity with the SADC Appeal, and Mozambique has maintained a red alert in affected areas.

06 Dec 2016 description

Johannesburg, 6 December 2016: Southern Africa is now entering the peak of the lean season following the worst El Niño-induced drought in decades. With food stocks largely depleted due to poor or failed harvests across the region, estimates of people in need of humanitarian assistance have increased by more than one million to 13.8 million, mainly due to rising needs in Madagascar, Malawi, and Zimbabwe.

13 Oct 2016 description
  • Southern Africa is experiencing the worst El Niño-induced drought in 35 years, following the failure of two consecutive rainy seasons. Governments have led the response. However, the scale of needs overwhelm national capacity. Lesotho, Malawi, Swaziland, and Zimbabwe have declared national drought emergencies, and Mozambique declared a red alert; all, together with Madagascar, calling for urgent international assistance.

20 Sep 2016 description

Key Messages

  • While generous donor support has assisted humanitarian responders to reach millions of drought-affected people, significant funding shortages continue to impede the response. Only half of the funds for emergency food and agriculture assistance has been raised, while many other sectoral responses remain largely unfunded, including education (12 per cent funded); protection (18 per cent); water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) (18 per cent); and early recovery (26 per cent).