RCOA
Non-governmental Organization based in Australia

The Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) is the national umbrella body for refugees and the organisations and individuals who support them. It has more than 200 organisational and over 900 individual members.

All Updates

54 entries found
03 Oct 2018 description

Nauru: The facts

Around 900 people, including an estimated 95 children, are still living in limbo on Nauru after having been sent there by Australia under its regime of offshore processing. All of them have been there for over four years.

03 Sep 2018 description

Six years after the Australian government began sending people seeking asylum to Nauru, there are still around 900 people left on the island, including an estimated 109 children.1 All of them will have been there for over four years. Almost 200 people lived in a processing centre, including 14 children,2 until they were cleared out along with tents and temporary accommodation they were living in for the Pacific Islands Forum.3 In 2013, Amnesty International reported that Australia’s policy of offshore processing was breaking people. Six years on, people are broken.

30 Aug 2018 description

Index: ASA 05/8971/2018

30 August 2018

JOINT OPEN LETTER TO THE PACIFIC ISLANDS FORUM LEADERS AND OBSERVERS IN THE CONTEXT OF AUSTRALIA’S ABUSIVE OFFSHORE REFUGEE PROCESSING POLICY

23 Aug 2018 description

Canberra, Australia: The Refugee Council of Australia has today joined a renewed campaign to pressure Australia’s political leaders to bring the 119 children currently trapped on Nauru, to Australia.

The #KidsOffNauru Campaign, driven by Australia’s prominent humanitarian and refugee sector organisations, is calling for the urgent evacuation of children off the island and brought to Australia.

19 Jul 2018 description

Today marks five years since the Australian government started sending everyone coming by boat to seek asylum to languish in offshore detention centres in the Pacific, never to be resettled in Australia. In those five years, 12 people have died, families have been torn apart, and over 3,000 children and adults have endured enormous mental and physical harm. Yet the Australian government celebrates the policy as a ‘success’, and other parts of the world are now looking to the Australian way as a potential ‘solution’.