Academic and Research Institution based in United States of America

The Migration Policy Institute is an independent, nonpartisan, nonprofit think tank in Washington, DC dedicated to analysis of the movement of people worldwide.

MPI provides analysis, development, and evaluation of migration and refugee policies at local, national, and international levels. It aims to meet the demand for pragmatic and thoughtful responses to the challenges and opportunities that large-scale migration, whether voluntary or forced, presents to communities and institutions in an increasingly integrated world.

Founded in 2001 by Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Kathleen Newland, MPI grew out of the International Migration Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Headquartered in Washington, DC, MPI has offices in Manila and New York, with a presence in the United Kingdom. In 2011, MPI established the Brussels-based Migration Policy Institute Europe, which builds upon the work that MPI has done for years in Europe.

All Updates

75 entries found
17 Dec 2018 description

By Lauren Shaw

With policymakers under growing public pressure to manage unwanted migration, questions of how, when, and under what conditions unauthorized immigrants, rejected asylum seekers, and other migrants can be returned to their origin countries received increased attention at international levels in 2018.

14 Dec 2018 description

Report: Amid Extraordinary Pressure on Refugee Resettlement Program, Time Is Ripe to Rethink Ways to Improve Refugee Integration

11 Dec 2018 description

By Sara Staedicke

Despite the major focus by media and publics on a handful of refugee crises around the world—the Syrian, Afghan, and Venezuelan ones among them, and recently Yemen—displacement situations worsened during 2018 in a number of countries that received much less attention, and perhaps as a result less in the way of humanitarian aid.

02 Nov 2018 description

By Tessa Coggio

Although the movement of asylum seekers and refugees to the industrialized world captures much attention, the reality is that 85 percent are hosted in developing countries—which are taking on a growing share of the world’s humanitarian burden.