Mail & Guardian
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434 entries found
22 Jun 2018 description
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Peter Martell in Riwoto

The breath is shallow and ragged, as if the intake of air is painful for two-year- old Lotabo Loworet, his bony ribs visible through his ragged shirt.

“I had nothing to feed the baby,” says Lowerio Loworet, his aunt, who has looked after the boy since Lotabo’s mother died of a fever in the Kapoeta region, in the far southeast of war-torn South Sudan. “I was afraid he would die.”

As well as severe acute malnutrition, he is suffering from medical complications including pneumonia, causing a cough that wracks his tiny body.

13 May 2018 description
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Andrew Wasike

Stockpiles of charcoal cast long shadows that shield motorists from the scorching sun on the road that links the southern port of Buur Gaabo to the capital Mogadishu in the north.

Charcoal producers and traders can be seen packing their trucks near Mogadishu.

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12 Dec 2017 description
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The two camps in the west of the capital should have been closed down in mid-November. That was the government’s plan – to first provide temporary accommodation for the survivors and then more permanent housing solutions.

30 Nov 2017 description
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Ali Younes 29 Nov 2017 17:04

Hundreds of African refugees are being bought and sold in “slave markets” across Libya every week, a human trafficker has told Al Jazeera, with many of them held for ransom or forced into prostitution and sexual exploitation to pay their captors and smugglers.

Many of them ended up being murdered by their smugglers in the open desert or die from thirst or car accidents in the vast Libyan desert.

10 Nov 2017 description
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by Ra'eesa Pather

In the streets of Madagascar’s capital city, the plague is a ghost. Patients stay hidden away in hospitals or are at home, where some are keeping their illness a secret.

They fear death but, more than that, what happens after death — the anonymous mass grave that many patients believe is their inevitable fate.