Jordan

Request for Proposals- BETTER Project Baseline Evaluation - Jordan

CONSULTANT TERMS OF REFERENCE:

‘BETTER ENVIRONMENTS AND TRAINING TO EDUCATE RAPIDLY (BETTER)’ BASELINE STUDY

1. RIGHT TO PLAY

Established in 2000, Right To Play is an international non-governmental organization committed to improving the lives of children and youth affected by conflict, disease, and poverty. Headquartered in Toronto, Canada, Right To Play is active in 15 countries across Africa, Asia, and the Middle East, and has fundraising offices in six European and north American countries. Pioneering its innovative child-centered, play-based learning methodology, Right To Play works across the five key outcome areas of quality education, peaceful communities, health and well-being, gender equality, and child protection.

Right To Play has been active in the education and sports for development sectors in Jordan since 2006, training teachers in UNRWA and Ministry of Education schools as well as coaches in local communities to provide engaging interactive sessions that utilize games and sports to promote psychosocial wellbeing, education and gender equality. . Vulnerable Jordanian, Palestinian, and Syrian children who take part play days and tournaments organized by Right To Play are more engaged in school and have vastly improved life skills. In turn, the youth with whom Right To Play works achieve higher grades, experience greater levels of cooperation and cohesion, and are empowered to overcome trauma, adversity, and cultural stigmas to fulfil their dreams.

All RTP projects are gender-responsive, placing particular emphasis on female empowerment. They are also usually supported by a sustainable rehabilitation component whereby school classrooms and play spaces are renovated, football pitches are constructed within underserved communities, or students lead maintenance initiatives within their schools. In 2019, RTP reached a total of 102,848 Jordanian, Palestinian, and Syrian children and youth in schools across Amman, Irbid, Zarqa, Mafraq, and Aqaba. In addition, the organization currently has 2,904 active teachers and coaches, having trained 766 this year.

2. ‘Better environments and Training to Educate Rapidly’ (BETTER)

School closures in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have placed a considerable burden on the Jordanian education system and caused learning losses among students. The impact of school closures is compounded by pre-existing challenges, including the 2019 teacher strikes and an already overburdened and under-funded education system. Although the Ministry of Education (MoE) launched an online strategy, limited access to basic ICT infrastructure, connectivity and electricity has hampered learning in the country’s most remote areas and among vulnerable communities.

The BETTER project, funded by Walter Haefner Stiftung, aims to provide students in Amman and Karak with support to bridge the learning gap affected by school closures due to COVID-19. The project selected 10 MoE schools (four in Amman and six in Karak) on the basis of a school mapping and needs assessment exercise as well as criteria set by, and recommendations from the MoE. Through BETTER, Right To Play will train a total of 60 teachers 6 teachers in each school, covering the subjects, English, mathematics, Arabic and science. Reaching about 4800 students in catch up class.

The project is composed of two main intervention arms: the first focuses on the school environment and the second on students’ skills and motivation. Through a three-pronged approach, the project cultivates environments conducive to students’ learning, through: i) school rehabilitations; ii) training teachers in RTP’s play-based learning methodology; Play based activities

The rehabilitations target classrooms and washrooms, with selected schools chosen for playground rehabilitations and solar panel installation, the money saved on electricity from the latter in the coming years will be used for maintenance works. Teachers then receive comprehensive tailored trainings, based on RTP’s ‘Continuum of Teacher Training’ methodology. Indeed, pedagogical studies prove that creative, interactive, and applied learning is more effective for promoting information retention and transfer, as well as socio-emotional wellbeing and attitudes of inclusion, tolerance, and acceptance. The ‘CoTT’ methodology thus guides Jordanian educators in attaining new knowledge, shifting their attitudes, and gaining the skills to facilitate children’s educational development. Combining RTP’s ‘CoTT’ and its literacy and numeracy training approaches, the teacher trainings enable teachers to design and conduct effective play-based sessions tailored specifically towards literacy and numeracy learning objectives. The establishment of online resources and in-school libraries supports students’ learning, allowing them to revise in their own time and expand their reading.

The second area of intervention focuses on life skills and motivation to learn. This entails the identification of critical learning needs, delivery of tailored catch-up classes, establishment of support networks, and students’ participation in a range of stimulating play-based extracurricular activities that support their studies in English and Mathematics. Needs assessments are developed and undertaken to identify learning gaps, informing the catch-up classes and their attendees. Parent-teacher forums build parents’ awareness of how to support their children in their education, including how to build a positive learning environment at home. Then, to support students’ learning in mentioned subjects, a range of play-based extracurricular activities involving competitions further build students’ understanding of the subjects, as well as stimulate their interests. ‘Reading through Play’ sessions are held in English, with students then participating in school spelling bees. Play-based sessions and ‘play days’ build students’ understanding of math while cultivating key life skills, with student ‘mathletes’ competing in sports-based math tournaments.

RTP is also supporting the MoE in designing new learning curricula.

3. PROJECT GOAL AND OUTCOMES

IMPACT

Students in Jordan receive support to bridge the learning gap effected by school closures.

OUTCOMES

  1. Schools provide safe, positive, and well-equipped learning environments for students.
  2. Students receive quality education and support while building their life skills and motivation to learn.

Target Geographies

Amman and Karak, Jordan

Target Beneficiaries

§ Children and youth: 4.800 across 10 schools

§ Teachers: 60 (in English, Arabic, Science and Mathematics)

Full Project Timeline

12 months (April 2022 – March 2023)

Baseline Study Timeline

Approximately six weeks, beginning in August 2022

The project’s outcomes and indicators are as follows:

Ultimate Outcome: Students receive support to bridge the learning gap effected by school closures**.**

· % of students achieving at least a minimum proficiency in literacy and numeracy (targets set in coordination with the Ministry of Education)

· % of children reporting positive associations with school

Outcome One: Schools provide safe, positive, and well-equipped learning environments for students.

· % of classrooms that meet positive learning environment principles

· % of schools that have safe playgrounds and sanitation facilities

· % of school development plans that meet the criteria for safety, gender responsiveness, and environmental sustainability

· % of teachers that have knowledge of the minimum standards for a positive learning environment

· % of schools with on and offline libraries

Outcome Two: Students receive quality education and educational support while building their life skills and motivation to learn.**

· % of students reporting participating in play-based and/or interactive learning activities in school

· % of parents that show positive attitudes towards supporting their children's learning needs

· % of students demonstrating life skills

· % of students reporting motivation to learn

4. BASELINE CONSULTANCY OBJECTIVE AND SCOPE OF WORK

The objective of the baseline consultancy is to establish project starting points and benchmarks (indicator values) that will form the basis of a strong monitoring and evaluation framework. This will lay a critical foundation for measuring change, understanding the project’s contribution to achieving this change, and drawing lessons for future direction and project development. Given the lift of restrictions of COVID-19, the BETTER baseline is expected to be conducted in person especially the data collection phase.

The baseline consultant will be expected to:

· Perform a comprehensive review of existing project materials, M&E plan, and measurement tools, proposing any adjustments necessary for ensuring conceptual validity and that will feed into regular monitoring exercises until the final evaluation, taking into account limitations expected and safety measures to be adopted as a result of the COVID-19 crisis.

· Design and plan a baseline study that may be implemented in-country, partly online and that complies with Right To Play and governmental regulations concerning the COVID-19 crisis in collaboration with Right To Play staff, holding responsibility for the overall approach and methodology. An inception report must be submitted prior to the start of the study, providing a detailed evaluation plan that gives:

o An outline of the study approach/methodology and COVID-19 safety measures to be undertaken

o The timeline of activities

o Sampling requirements and framework

o The methodology of collecting, triangulating, and summarizing qualitative and quantitative primary and secondary data (if needed, data quality protocols should be developed to guide data collection/entry for Right To Play field staff, including spot checking protocols) and COVID-19 safety measures to be undertaken

o Fieldwork logistics and schedule

o Fieldwork manual including data collectors’ training guide

· Design and/or revise existing data collection methodology and tools to be used during the baseline, as well as for routine monitoring until the final evaluation, outlining COVID-19 safety measures to be undertaken

· Provide training for data collectors and submit the following:

o Data collectors’ training agenda

o Data collectors’ training report

· Provide recommendations and plans for integrating data collection tools and/or other required data sets necessary for monitoring and evaluating the project, considering the possibility of an extended COVID-19 crisis.

· Provide a comprehensive baseline assessment report (both a draft and final version) establishing baseline values for measuring the achievement of the project’s outcomes and impact. Values for all outcome and output indicators must be produced.

5. BASELINE METHODOLOGY

The baseline study should be conducted in-country, with in person data collection. It should employ a variety of tools, including, for example, surveys, focus group discussions, and key informant interviews, to collect both qualitative and quantitative data, ensuring in-depth analysis of the project starting points and providing baseline indicator values. A review of project and organizational documents, as well as Right To Play’s current data collection tools must be undertaken, and all data collection practices must be in line with child safeguarding principles and both Right To Play and governmental COVID-19 safety regulations.

The baseline will be conducted with the communities where the project is being implemented. Right To Play will support the consultant in making any logistical arrangements for data collection and meetings with key stakeholders.

Right To Play will review the consultant’s submitted inception report prior to data collection and will provide guidance for the baseline report. All raw data must be submitted to Right To Play prior to submission of the final report.

6. ROLE DURATION

The baseline study should be started by late August 2022, with design, data collection, analysis and reporting lasting approximately six weeks. We expect data collection to begin in as soon as the first semester starts in schools (September 2022), with the report submitted by the Mid October 2022.

7. DELIVERABLES

Deliverables are illustrated below; the specifics and timeframe should be negotiated with Right To Play upon confirmation of the consultancy.

DELIVERABLE DETAILS

  1. Right To Play consultations

· An initial online kick-off meeting will be held with RTP to finalize plans for the study.

  1. Submission of Inception Report with evaluation and fieldwork plan

· Evaluation plan:

o An outline of the study approach/methodology and COVID-19 safety measures to be undertaken if any needed

o The timeline of activities

o Sampling requirements and framework

o The methodology of collecting, triangulating, and summarizing qualitative and quantitative primary and secondary data (if needed, data quality protocols should be developed to guide data collection/entry for Right To Play field staff, including spot checking protocols) and COVID-19 safety measures to be undertaken

· Fieldwork plan:

o Fieldwork logistics and schedule

o Fieldwork manual including data collectors’ training guide

  1. Training of data collectors and submission of report

o Data collectors’ training agenda

o Data collectors’ training report

  1. Data collection

· Ensure that both quantitative and qualitative data is collected in-person, or, if not possible, online.

  1. Data submission

· Cleaned, raw data in two formats: Excel and a statistical analysis software format (e.g. SPSS or STATA) if possible.

  1. Validation Workshop

· Online consultation with key stakeholders for revision and validation of findings.

  1. First Draft Baseline Evaluation Report

· Revised data analysis framework document

· Excel spreadsheets, or SPSS/Stata scripts with clear, easy to understand notes

· Ensure that all values for outcome and output indicators are provided (filled in on the PMF) and decide on final target values in collaboration with RTP.

· Draft baseline report.

  1. Final Baseline Evaluation Report

· PowerPoint presentation with summary findings for formal presentation to key stakeholders.

· Copies of original and cleaned data sets including any field notes, as well as annexes of processed results tables (with all levels of disaggregation, including geographical areas breakdown).

· Final report

  1. De-briefing meeting with RTP

N/A

8. QUALIFICATIONS

· A consultant/consultancy firm/group with at least 3-8 years of experience in the research and/or evaluation field, including experience in quantitative and qualitative data collection, analyzing quantitative and qualitative data, and reporting.

· Extensive experience managing and designing evaluation studies in diverse contexts (e.g. Middle East context, with children and young people, in urban settings, etc.).

· Extensive experience creating measurement frameworks, refining indicators, and creating measurement tools for education-focused programs.

· Experience in education.

· Experience in Positive Youth Development (PYD), life skills measurement and behavioral change measurement, and youth psycho-social wellbeing.

· Experience using participatory methodologies and following OECD-DAC principles for evaluation and measurement.

· A relevant degree in social sciences, international development, statistical sciences, or another related field.**

· Excellent skills in, and experience with, data analysis using statistical computing tools (Excel, SPSS, STATA, NVIVO).**

· Proficiency in Arabic and in English.**

· Experience conducting online studies is desirable, though not required.**

9. PROPOSAL APPLICATION SUBMISSION

Interested organizations should submit proposals with the following documents:**

· Cover letter including the consultant’s/firm’s suitability for the assignment and current contact information.

· Registration document for the consultancy company/group

· CV including contact details of two references. If the lead consultant is planning to recruit enumerators in Jordan to support the data collection, data entry, and dataset development, please state this in your application and if possible, provide details (cost, expertise, expected role of each consultant, etc.).

· Include one or two samples of previous evaluation work.

· A detailed response to the ToRs, including: a technical proposal addressing the purpose and objectives of the assignment; plans for in-person data collection as well as COVID-19 contingency plans in the event of new restrictions, and key sampling criteria.

· Financial proposal with a detailed budget breakdowns for each methodology based on expected daily rates and an initial work plan.

· Initial drafts of the proposed workplans for each methodology in the form of a Gantt chart.

Both the financial and technical proposals must be submitted to Logistics Officer Fakhri Al Syouri fsayouri@righttoplay the 16th of June 2022 Please also copy Heba Al Qaisi, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning Officer, at halqaisi@righttoplay.com

All offers should be valid until at least until the 30th August 2022. If you are applying as an international organisation, please ensure that you include all travel costs in your financial offer. All enumerator and training costs must also be included.

The selected candidate must adhere to both Right To Play and governmental standards regarding health and safety in light of the COVID-19 crisis, including all required social distancing measures.

Right To Play is a child-centered organization. Our recruitment and selection procedures reflect our commitment to the safety and protection of children in our programs.

How to apply

9. PROPOSAL APPLICATION SUBMISSION

Interested organizations should submit proposals with the following documents:**

· Cover letter including the consultant’s/firm’s suitability for the assignment and current contact information.

· Registration document for the consultancy company/group

· CV including contact details of two references. If the lead consultant is planning to recruit enumerators in Jordan to support the data collection, data entry, and dataset development, please state this in your application and if possible, provide details (cost, expertise, expected role of each consultant, etc.).

· Include one or two samples of previous evaluation work.

· A detailed response to the ToRs, including: a technical proposal addressing the purpose and objectives of the assignment; plans for in-person data collection as well as COVID-19 contingency plans in the event of new restrictions, and key sampling criteria.

· Financial proposal with a detailed budget breakdowns for each methodology based on expected daily rates and an initial work plan.

· Initial drafts of the proposed workplans for each methodology in the form of a Gantt chart.

Both the financial and technical proposals must be submitted to Logistics Officer Fakhri Al Syouri fsayouri@righttoplay the 16th of June 2022 Please also copy Heba Al Qaisi, Monitoring, Evaluation, and Learning Officer, at halqaisi@righttoplay.com

All offers should be valid until at least until the 30th August 2022. If you are applying as an international organisation, please ensure that you include all travel costs in your financial offer. All enumerator and training costs must also be included.

The selected candidate must adhere to both Right To Play and governmental standards regarding health and safety in light of the COVID-19 crisis, including all required social distancing measures.

Right To Play is a child-centered organization. Our recruitment and selection procedures reflect our commitment to the safety and protection of children in our programs.

Note: Final candidates will be contacted by RTP and only the ones who make it to the final phase (Interview phase) of the recruitment process will be notified whether they have been selected or not.