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16 Aug 2016 description

What is La Niña?

La Niña is the cooling of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every three to five years, lasting from six to 24 months. On average, half of El Niño events are followed by a La Niña, which typically affects global climate patterns in the opposite way El Niño does. The intensity of the La Niña climatic phenomenon generally peaks between October and January

Purpose of this report

18 Jul 2016 description
report Oxfam

The devastating impacts of the 2015–16 El Niño will be felt well into 2017. This crisis was predicted, yet overall, the response has been too little too late. The looming La Niña event may further hit communities that are already deeply vulnerable.

05 Jul 2016 description

Global overview

What is La Niña?

La Niña is the cooling of sea surface temperatures in the tropical Pacific, which occurs roughly every three to five years, lasting from six to 24 months. The chances of La Niña following an El Niño episode are higher on average — half of the El Niño events are followed by a La Niña — and typically it affects global climate patterns in the opposite way El Niño does. The intensity of the La Niña climatic phenomenon generally peaks between October and January.

Purpose of this report

17 Jun 2016 description

June 17, 2016 IASC Early Warning, Early Action and Readiness Report for the period June to November 2016. The Report is biannual, with a 6 month horizon. It is the product of a group of Agency analysts. In most cases these individuals work for their respective Emergency Directors. Analysis of preparedness status is provided by OCHA. The Report complements more frequent interaction between RC/HC and the ERC as the IASC system officials accountable for ensuring interagency early action and readiness. This should take place using the IASC Emergency Response Preparedness approach.