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24 Dec 2012 description
report The New York Times

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — A few days after the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake, Reginald Boulos opened the gates of his destroyed car dealership to some 14,000 displaced people who settled on the expansive property. Seven months later, eager to rebuild his business, he paid the families $400 each to leave Camp Boulos and return to their devastated neighborhoods.

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19 Nov 2012 description
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By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

FAUCHÉ, Haiti — A woman who lost just about everything now gives her children coffee for meals because it quiets their stomachs a bit. Another despondent mother relives the awful moment when her 18-month-old baby was swept from her arms by a flash flood. The bodies of a family of five killed in a mudslide still sit in a morgue unclaimed.

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16 Aug 2012 description
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PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Since the earthquake of Jan. 12, 2010, a scrappy 12-year-old boy named Givenson Fanfan has been sleeping on the rock-hard floor of a tent pitched in a fetid camp dominated by a 50-foot tower of trash. He dreams of a bed.

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06 Jul 2012 description
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By DEBORAH SONTAG Published: July 5, 2012

CARACOL, Haiti — On the first anniversary of the Jan. 12, 2010, earthquake, in a sleepy corner of northeast Haiti far from the disaster zone, the Haitian government began the process of evicting 366 farmers from a large, fertile tract of land to clear the way for a new industrial park.

The Caracol Industrial Park is on about a square mile of former farmland. A river flows through it into Caracol Bay, which contains Haiti's most extensive mangrove reserve and a strip of coral reef.

09 Jan 2012 description
report The New York Times

BRASILÉIA, Brazil — Of the odyssey that delivered him to this town in the Brazilian Amazon, Wesley Saint-Fleur could muster only a look of exhaustion and bewilderment.

09 Jan 2012 description
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By LAURENT DUBOIS and DEBORAH JENSON

09 Jan 2012 description
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Editorial

25 Dec 2011 description
report The New York Times

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

PAPAYE, Haiti — For months after the earthquake that struck the capital, Manel Laurore pulled shattered bodies from his neighbors’ homes, hunkered in fetid refugee camps and scrounged for food and water.

Today, his main worries are when his bean, corn and plantain crops will come in.

“I will never go back to Port-au-Prince,” said Mr. Laurore, 32, a former shopkeeper who was sifting soil to plant a tomato garden, referring to the capital. “It left a strong pain inside. Here the work is hard, but you live in total peace.”

06 Sep 2011 description
report The New York Times

By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

Populations on the run during disasters can be tracked by cellphone signals, which could help guide life-saving aid to the right places, a new study has concluded.

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30 Aug 2011 description
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By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

CHENE, Dominican Republic — They have been blamed for spreading cholera, taking jobs and driving up crime, and now, with memories of the earthquake and the bonhomie it generated rapidly fading, this country is taking action: it is deporting Haitian refugees, turning them away from the border and generally making their lives difficult.

Benie Boner was photographed and fingerprinted last month in Chene, Dominican Republic, as part of the International Organization for Migration's project to help Haitian refugees repatriate.

01 Jun 2011 description
report The New York Times

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD

MEXICO CITY — As a new Haitian government seeks to jump-start aid to rebuild the country after the January 2010 earthquake, a draft of a new United States government report suggests that the scope of the disaster was not as severe as previously estimated.

21 Nov 2010 description
report The New York Times

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD and DAMIEN CAVE

Published: November 21, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Crushed buildings from the January earthquake still spill out onto sidewalks here, people are collapsing from cholera at hospital doors and a wave of rioting last week reminded Haitians of political turmoil of the past.

It may not be the best time to choose a president.

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14 Nov 2010 description
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By DEBORAH SONTAG

Published: November 14, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - In mid-October, when fresh-faced girls in starched uniforms skipped through the gates of the Collège Classique Féminin to start the first post-earthquake school year, their desire to seek sanctuary inside was palpable.

Dashing off a street clogged with vendors hawking car mats and phone chargers, they reconnected with hugs and squeals. They cheered the absence of the stifling tents in which they studied last spring.

13 Nov 2010 description
report The New York Times

By DANIEL COSTELLO

Published: November 13, 2010

VENANTE LINO, a small-business owner who lost nearly everything in the devastating earthquake in January, stood in line here along with dozens of other impeccably dressed women, all waiting to pay the latest monthly installment on the emergency loans they received to rebuild their businesses.

Mrs. Lino approached a folding table in the courtyard of one of the few remaining buildings in this town, located near the quake's epicenter.

17 Oct 2010 description
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By DEBORAH SONTAG

Published: October 17, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Wearing a Nike visor, sunglasses, a crisp linen shirt and pressed jeans, Randal Perkins of Pompano Beach, Fla., watched with satisfaction as his $400,000 hydraulic excavator clawed into a towering pile of concrete chunks in the shattered heart of this city.

"This is what the people have been waiting for," Mr.

04 Oct 2010 description
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By DEBORAH SONTAG

Published: October 4, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - As tent camps go, the one on the 28-acre Church of God property overlooking the Valley of Bourdon is almost bucolic, with hundreds of canvas-draped shelters under leafy shade trees and a cohesiveness among residents. But panic is building there.

The Church of God is planning to evict the encampment in the near future.

09 Jul 2010 description
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By DAMIEN CAVE

Published: July 8, 2010

ANSE À GALETS, Haiti - Kesia Damas complains every day about losing her favorite teacher. Mr. B introduced her to drama, taught her art and inspired her to dream of a film career far more glamorous than this dusty village.

"He was always here, helping," said Kesia, 17, as she rehearsed a play she wrote about anger and vengeance. "He pushed me."

But the powerful earthquake of Jan. 12 did not take him, not directly at least. Mr.

05 Jul 2010 description
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By DEBORAH SONTAG

Published: July 5, 2010

CROIX-DES-BOUQUETS, Haiti - More than five months after the earthquake that killed her single mother, Daphne Joseph, 14, lost her bearings a second time when she was forced to leave the makeshift orphanage where she had felt at home.

Immediately after the earthquake, she watched with horror as her mother's mangled body was carted away in a wheelbarrow from a shattered marketplace.

29 May 2010 description
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By DAMIEN CAVE

Published: May 29, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - With graffiti and protests, from sweltering tents to air-conditioned offices, Haitians are desperately trying to get a message to their government and the world: enough with the status quo.

The simple phrase "Aba Préval" (Down with Préval, a reference to Haiti's president, René Préval) has become shorthand for a long list of frustrations, and an epithet expressing a broader fear - that Haitians will be stuck in limbo indefinitely, and that the opportunity to reinvent Haiti is being lost.

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27 Apr 2010 description
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By DEBORAH SONTAG

Published: April 27, 2010

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - More than 100 long days after the earthquake, Ginette Lemazor, her husband and their impish 5-year-old boy are still living in a filthy mechanics' lot on Avenue Poupelard.

At least, Ms. Lemazor said, they are no longer sleeping in a junked car, but in a flimsy structure fashioned from plastic sheeting and salvaged wood. They have a bed - "Please, make yourself at home," she said, pointing to it - and a chair.