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23 Oct 2018 description
report The Guardian

Study suggests biopesticides should be trialled to control plague of caterpillars that’s destroying crops across the continent

Experts have identified safer, effective pesticides they believe can control a plague of caterpillars that is devastating crops across Africa.

08 May 2018 description
report The Conversation

The ConversationSaliou Niassy, Head of Technology Transfer Unit, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology ICIPE, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology
Sevgan Subramanian, Entomologist and Insect Pathologist, International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology

30 Mar 2018 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary
- The pest, which infested an estimated 17,521ha of maize out of over 60,000ha last year during season B was successfully controlled, but experts urge farmers to remain vigilant.
- Minister of Agriculture, Geraldine Mukeshimana said the fall armyworm still poses a threat to farms in parts of the country.
- FAO emphasises the need for farmer education and community action in curbing the spread of the pest.

By Johnson Kanamugire

15 Mar 2018 description
report New Vision

By Wilson Manishimwe

Added 14th March 2018 05:05 PM

According to Dr Godfrey Asea, the director National Crops Resources Research Institute,only a resilient variety could withstand the ‘cocktail’ of constraints such as the armyworm.

WAKISO - Farming experts have urged maize farmers countrywide to adopt drought-tolerant maize to boost food security.

04 Mar 2018 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary
- Intercropping maize with drought-resistant greenleaf desmodium and planting Brachiaria grass on the farm’s edge helps curb fall armyworms.

Researchers have found intercropping maize with drought-resistant greenleaf desmodium and planting Brachiaria grass on the farm’s edge helps curb fall armyworms.

Desmodium and Brachiaria grass are high quality animal fodder plants.

19 Feb 2018 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary

  • Kenyan traders imported more than 77,500 tonnes of maize worth $31.2 million since January from its neighbours.

  • This is the highest amount of imports in the past five years as drought and the effects of the fall armyworm manifest in the country’s staple.

  • Kenyan traders have taken advantage of the low prices in Uganda’s Tororo, Gulu, Masindi and Lira regions to ship in the produce, buying a tonne for as low as $180 per tonne.

By ALLAN OLINGO

11 Feb 2018 description
report EastAfrican

By LEONCE MUVUNYI

Rwanda is making arrangements to deliver food assistance to support more than 3,000 families in the Eastern Province who need urgent assistance to combat the worst effects of a prolonged drought.

According to the Ministry of Agriculture and Animal Resources’ (Minagri), despite other parts of the country recording good harvests in season A this year, which is currently ending, numerous households in Eastern Province have been left stranded with little or no harvests, putting them at a risk of hunger.

18 Jan 2018 description
report New Vision

The traps are to help farmers get prepared before the first planting season sets in

KAMPALA - The Government’s plan of commercialising agriculture could be hampered by the increasing incident of pests and diseases.

Under the plan, the Government identified 12 key priority food items for both food security and income-generation through export.

Maize, which is both a food security crop and an economic crop, is being threatened by various pests and diseases.

25 Oct 2017 description
report The Guardian

Crops that feed 200 million people at risk from destructive march of fall armyworm, as agriculture experts call for urgent action

The crops that 200 million people rely on in Africa are under threat from a caterpillar that is spreading throughout the continent, agriculture experts have warned.

Read more on the Guardian.

12 Oct 2017 description
report Inter Press Service

By Miriam Gathigah

NAIROBI, Oct 12 2017 (IPS) - A growing number of African countries are increasingly becoming food insecure as delayed and insufficient rainfall, as well as crop damaging pests such as the ongoing outbreak of the fall armyworm, cause the most severe maize crisis in the last decade.

Experts have warned that as weather patterns become even more erratic and important crops such as maize are unable to resist the fall armyworm infestation, there will not be enough food on the table.

22 Sep 2017 description
report EastAfrican

African countries are facing a maize shortage and losses running into billions of dollars due to the devastation caused by the fall armyworm.

A new report released by the Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International (Cabi) shows that improper management of the armyworm could cost 10 of the continent’s major maize producing economies between $2.2 billion and $5.5 billion per year in lost maize harvests.

13 Sep 2017 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary

  • While Uganda produces close to four million tonnes of maize annually, Agriculture Minister Vincent Sempijja said that the impact of the armyworm infestation could be responsible for the loss of at least 450,000 tonnes of maize or $192.8 million worth of maize exports.

  • First reported in Nigeria in January 2016, the fall armyworm has since spread to Kenya, Zambia, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Togo, and Ghana.

11 Sep 2017 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary

-Maize production is expected to decline by between 20 and 30 per cent this crop year due to insufficient long rains and infestation by the fall armyworm across 27 counties.

  • A ban on maize exports by Tanzania saw exports to Kenya plunge by 54 per cent below average, and mostly through informal channels, according to Ministry of Agriculture data.

03 Sep 2017 description
report The Conversation

The Conversation

Esther Ndumi Ngumbi, Research Fellow, Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn University

28 Aug 2017 description
report Monitor-Uganda

By DAN WANDERA LUWEERO.

Caterpillars have invaded Luweero eating several acres of crops, causing fear among residents that famine could strike the district.

According to the district entomology department, there are three types of caterpillars ravaging the district. They include the tailed green, the fall armyworm and the black hairy caterpillar. The most destructive to crops is the armyworm.

17 Aug 2017 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary

  • The thinking is driven by conclusions that the worm and its rapid spread might have been as a result of climate change.
  • Currently, Uganda’s Ministry of Agriculture is evaluating the extent of the damage caused by the worms’ invasion to the first season’s crop.
  • Scientists advise that control measures be considered when egg masses are present on five per cent of the plants or when 25 per cent of the plants show damage symptoms and larvae are still present.

By HALIMA ABDALLAH

21 Jul 2017 description
report EastAfrican

In Summary

  • The pest has affected 100,000 hectares of maize plantation, further threatening food security.

  • Uasin Gishu has trained its sights on intensive sensitisation programmes for farmers, especially those who grow maize during the off-seasons.

  • The ministry has approved at least nine chemicals for controlling the pest.

By STANLEY KIMUGE

Kenyan maize farmers in the North Rift are battling re-infestation of the fall armyworm that is threatening the country's food security.

18 Jul 2017 description
report Inter Press Service

By Busani Bafana

BULAWAYO, Zimbabwe, Jul 18 2017 (IPS)

Southern African countries have agreed on a multi-pronged plan to increase surveillance and research to contain the fall army worm, which has cut forecast regional maize harvests by up to ten percent, according to a senior U.N. Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) official.

15 Jul 2017 description
report Voice of America

Sora Halake

A recently arrived species of armyworm has spread to 21 African countries and threatens the continent's main food staple, maize, report experts from the U.S. Agency for International Development.

USAID senior biotechnology advisor Joseph Huesing says the fall armyworms -- transported from their usual habitat in the U.S. state of Florida or the Caribbean -- are attacking maize crops all over sub-Saharan Africa.