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30 Apr 2015 description

Overview

Throughout 2014, the regional office continued working in 15 countries in Eastern Africa and Indian Ocean Islands; Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Comoros, Seychelles, Mauritius, Rwanda and Burundi. The regional office supported the development of 6 emergency appeals and 15 DREFs in response to floods, disease outbreaks, terror attacks and population movement in Comoros, Madagascar, Seychelles, Burundi, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, South Sudan, Sudan and Uganda.

31 Mar 2014 description
  1. Who are we?

The IFRC Regional Representation for Eastern Africa and Indian Ocean Islands, as part of the IFRC Africa Zone, supports National Societies (NS) to train and mobilise volunteers to respond to emergencies and to make communities more resilient to risks. It aims to make this work sustainable by bringing evidence-based cases of the benefits of Red Cross/Red Crescent volunteer action to new and existing stakeholders in the humanitarian and development sector.

22 Jan 2014 description

1. Executive Summary

Situated in a region prone to man-made, natural, slow-onset or rapid complex emergencies, the IFRC EAIOIRO supports Red Cross and Red Crescent (RC / RC) National Societies in humanitarian response and enhancing communities’ capacity to be more resilient to hazards and risks.

18 May 2011 description

This report covers the period 01 January to 31 December 2010.

In brief

30 Oct 2008 description

Executive summary

The Eastern Africa Zone covers 14 National Societies (NS) - Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. The Zone has four country representations in Somalia, Sudan, Eritrea and Ethiopia and two Sub Zones covering the Indian Ocean Islands and East Africa countries.

The Eastern Africa Zone continues to experience major disasters which claim many lives, destroy property and erode the already weak livelihoods of the communities affected.